Parks & Rec’s Nick Offerman to Star in A Confederacy of Dunces

first_img Based on John Kennedy Toole’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, the play centers on the larger-than-life character Ignatius J. Reilly: overweight, arrogant, eccentric, and still living in his mother’s New Orleans home in the 1960s. Called the Don Quixote of the French Quarter, Ignatius has a singular outlook on life. His farcical odyssey includes visits to a department store and a strip club, and stints working at a pants factory and as a hot dog vendor. Nick Offerman is set to lead the world premiere A Confederacy of Dunces. The Parks & Recreation star will begin performances in Jeffrey Hatcher’s adaptation on November 11 at the Huntington Theatre in Boston. The production, directed by David Esbjornson, is the first offering of the Huntington’s 2015-2016 season. View Comments A Confederacy of Dunces will run at the Huntington through December 13. Offerman is best known for the role of Ron Swanson on NBC’s Parks & Recreation, which just completed its seventh and final season. His long list of film credits includes 22 Jump Street, The Lego Movie, We’re the Millers, Smashed, Sin City, Casa de mi Padre, The Men Who Stare at Goats, 21 Jump Street and many more. In 2013, Offerman released his bestselling book, Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man’s Fundamentals for Delicious Living. He got his start in the Chicago theatre community, where he received a Joseph Jefferson Award for his performance in The Kentucky Cycle and a second Jefferson Award for the puppets and masks he and his team crafted for The Skriker. He has also worked extensively at Steppenwolf Theatre Company, the Goodman Theatre, and Wisdom Bridge, among others, he appeared in Adding Machine off-Broadway, and is currently a company member of the Evidence Room Theater Company in Los Angeles.last_img read more

National Life CEO MacLeay Announces Retirement

first_imgNational Life Group CEO Announces RetirementMontpelier, Vermont (June 10, 2008) – Thomas H. MacLeay announced today that he will retire by year’s end as President and Chief Executive Officer of National Life Group(r). MacLeay will remain as Chairman of the Board of the financial services company.”National Life is strong,” said MacLeay, 58. “This is an excellent time to make the transition to new leadership.”MacLeay, a Vermont native who has worked at National Life for 32 years, has served as President of the company for a total of 11 years and CEO and Chairman for the past six years.”I have accomplished what I set out to do six years ago, which was to strengthen the company’s financial foundation, diversify and grow its businesses, and build an executive team superbly qualified to continue to move the organization forward,” said MacLeay.National Life Group(r), a Fortune 1000 company, serves more than 700,000 customers. With 2007 revenue of $1.4 billion and net income of $109 million, the companies of National Life Group(r) have roughly 900 employees, with most located at the Group’s home office in Montpelier, Vermont. Group companies also maintain offices in Dallas, New York, San Francisco, Boston and Philadelphia.National Life Group(r) (NLGroup) includes its flagship company, National Life Insurance Company, founded in Montpelier in 1848. Also in NLGroup are Life Insurance Company of the Southwest in Dallas, Texas, and Sentinel Investments, Equity Services, Inc. and National Retirement Plan Advisors, all located in Montpelier.David Coates, lead independent director on the National Life Group(r) Board of Directors, said MacLeay has revitalized the company. “The right person in the right place at the right time can change everything – and for National Life, Tom MacLeay has been that person.””When the Board named Tom as CEO, I said no one was better suited, better prepared or better able to fill the leadership post. Time has proven me right. By every measure National Life is stronger and more vibrant today than it was before Tom took over,” said Coates.During MacLeay’s tenure as chief executive officer, National Life Group(r) has experienced exceptional growth by every possible measure. NLGroup’s assets under management jumped from $13 billion in 2002 to $20 billion this year; net income has broken the $100 million mark each of the last two years, and statutory capitalization has been growing at an annual rate of 15 percent since 2002.”Most importantly, Tom has worked to grow and diversify the businesses so that today the company has an excellent and healthy balance of business, with about a third of its assets under management from life insurance, a third from annuities and roughly 25 percent from Sentinel Investments, our asset management company,” said Coates.MacLeay also has been responsible for enhancing National Life Group’s(r) commitment to the environment and its reputation as a socially responsible corporate citizen. Under his leadership the company formed a major charitable foundation and embarked upon an ambitious, multi-faceted project to turn its Montpelier headquarters into a green campus. MacLeay just announced the company will soon begin installing on its roof the largest solar electricity project in the state. National Life Group(r) is on schedule to win coveted LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification this year for its Montpelier headquarters.Coates said he and the other members of the Board are pleased MacLeay will remain as Chairman of the Board, “and that we will still have the benefit of his leadership and vision.”According to Coates, the Board has been focused on leadership development and succession planning for some time in anticipation of MacLeay’s retirement. The Board has already begun a process to select a successor.MacLeay joined National Life in 1976 as a security analyst, rapidly advancing through the management ranks and serving in pivotal positions at critical times in the company’s growth and expansion. He became President and Chief Operating Officer in 1996; in 2002 he was named Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board.MacLeay said he is looking forward to continuing a role with the company as Chairman of the Board, and is also eager to have time for other endeavors. “Charlotte and I are looking forward to spending more time with our children and grandchildren and hope to do some extended travel,” he said. “We are both active with several organizations, have deep roots in the local community and have no plans to change our primary residence.”MacLeay is Chairman of the Board of Sentinel Group Funds, Inc., and currently serves on the Board of Directors of Chittenden Trust Company and the Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation. He is a Trustee and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Air Force Aid Society.The MacLeays live in Montpelier. They have two grown children, David MacLeay and Kate MacLeay Crespo, and two grandchildren.###About National Life Group(r)National Life Group(r) is a diversified family of financial service companies that has successfully forged a strong identity as a product innovator. Companies in the group offer a comprehensive portfolio of life insurance, annuity and investment products to help individuals, families and businesses pursue their financial goals.National Life, a Fortune 1000 company, serves more than 700,000 customers. With 2007 revenue of $1.4 billion and net income of $109 million, members of National Life Group(r) employ roughly 900 employees, with most located at its home office in Montpelier, VT. Group companies also maintain offices in Dallas, New York, San Francisco, Boston and Philadelphia.The Group is made up of its flagship company, National Life Insurance Company, founded in Montpelier, Vermont in 1848; Life Insurance Company of the Southwest, Dallas, Texas, and Sentinel Investments, Equity Services, Inc. and National Retirement Plan Advisors, all located in Montpelier.National Life Group(r) is a trade name of National Life Insurance Company and its affiliates. National Life Insurance Company’s variable insurance products are distributed by Equity Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. Sentinel Funds are distributed by Sentinel Financial Services Company, Member FINRA/SIPC. Life Insurance Company of the Southwest offers fixed insurance products in all states except New York. All companies referenced are affiliates of National Life Group(r). Each company of the National Life Group(r) is solely responsible for its own financial condition and contractual obligations.last_img read more

PGN seeks to cut 2020 capex by up to 60 percent

first_imgThe company will focus spending on building a new piping system for the 50-year-old Rokan Block in Riau and on exploiting the oil-rich Pangkah Block in East Java.PGN’s parent company, state-owned oil and gas company Pertamina, ordered the new piping system prior to taking over Indonesia’s second-most productive oil block from United States-based Chevron next year.Meanwhile, PGN’s upstream subsidiary, PT Saka Energi Indonesia, is the sole operator of the Pangkah Block that produced 3,024 barrels of oil per day in the first quarter, making it the company’s most productive oil block.Company cash reserves stood at $1.35 billion in March, up 29.3 percent from December 2019, according to PGN’s latest available financial report.Even though oil prices have rebounded since March, analysts expect the international oil price benchmark Brent to remain below $50 per barrel, lower than last year’s average.PGN saw its net profit fall by 31.8 percent year-on-year to $56.48 million in the Jan-March period this year, the report also shows.Topics : Gas distributor PT Perusahaan Gas Negara (PGN) is looking to cancel most of its capital expenditure planned for this year to secure its cash flow amid weak global oil prices.The publicly listed company has asked its board of commissioners for permission to only disburse between 40 and 44 percent of the initially budgeted US$705 million in capital expenditure for this year, according to PGN finance director Arie Nobelta Kaban.“We will prioritize [spending] on projects that will generate short-term revenue,” he told the press on Friday, estimating that 10 percent of the budget has been disbursed as of June.last_img read more

For Mickelson, it’s not easy being rich

first_imgby Tim Dahlberg AP Sports Columnist It’s not always easy being rich, as Phil Mickelson reminded us the other day. There are taxes to pay — apparently lots of them — and the price of a tank of jet fuel seems to go up every day.A million dollars a week just doesn’t go as far as it used to, now that the wealthy are paying more in taxes. For Mickelson, things have gotten so bad that he’s thinking of moving from California so the state doesn’t get a cut of the $47 million that Golf Digest estimates he made last year.Thankfully, it’s not quite to the point where Tiger Woods and his buddies need to hold a car wash to raise money for Lefty. He has, after all, made an estimated $400 million in the last decade and even the greediest of tax collectors doesn’t take it all.And he does seem to realize — though a bit belatedly — that one thing rich people shouldn’t do is complain to people who aren’t rich about the taxes they have to pay. Mickelson was barely done moaning about the taxman the other day when he began a round of apologies that continued Wednesday at his hometown tournament in San Diego.“I’ve made some dumb, dumb, mistakes, and, obviously, talking about this stuff was one of them,” Mickelson said.Not to worry. There are ways to stay put at home and still have enough left over for a few of the Five Guys hamburger franchises he loves so much.Among them are:WIN LESS: What good is winning when you have to pay so much of your earnings to the government? Sure, it goes against Mickelson’s competitive instincts, but there’s a good living to be made in the middle of the pack on the PGA Tour, where almost everyone is a millionaire. This week’s winning payout at Torrey Pines is $1,080,000, but why deal with the anguish of giving so much of it away? Luckily Mickelson has already taken an important step in that direction by winning only two times since capturing the Masters three years ago.THINK SILVER: Back in the days when the Tournament of Champions was held in Las Vegas and people still had silver dollars, the winner was paid every year with a wheelbarrow full of the coins. It might take a dump truck to hold enough silver dollars for today’s huge purses, but imagine the fun Mickelson could have when the IRS comes by to take its share. POOR PHIL–Phil Mickelson answers a question about comments he made about taxes during a news conference following his round in the Pro-Am at the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament at Torrey Pines on Jan. 23, 2013, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)last_img read more