Did Indians See Jurassic Beasts?

first_imgDid Indians have familiarity with Jurassic monsters, or were they good paleontologists, skilled at reconstructions?  In the “Random Samples” page of news tidbits in the journal Science March 30,1 the story is told and the interpretation given:Some fossils are rare, but this one recently unearthed in eastern Oregon may be positively mythic.  In life, the 2-meter-long Jurassic seagoing crocodile (above), discovered by members of the North American Research Group, sported scales, needlelike teeth, and a fishtail.  Some paleontologists, including Stanford University researcher Adrienne Mayor, think similar fossils may have inspired Native American representations of water monsters.  Mayor notes the croc’s “remarkable” resemblance, for example, to a 19th century Kiowa artist’s drawing (inset) of a legendary water serpent.No evidence was supplied whether Native Americans were even familiar with fossils, let alone whether they ever made reconstructions based on them.1Random Samples, “Oregon Sea Monster,” Science, Volume 315, Number 5820, Issue of 30 March 2007.Unless such fossils were articulated and completely exposed, it’s hard to imagine early hunter-gatherers reconstructing entire animals from fossils as well as this story claims.  Why is the more straightforward explanation, that some of them actually saw this beast and imitated it, not even considered?  The obvious reason is that there is no way in the evolutionary timetable humans and Jurassic crocs could have co-existed.    Not enough information is supplied in this short article to explain if the Kiowa drawing was an imitation of earlier legendary monsters that his ancestors might have seen.  It’s also not clear whether a 19th century Indian might have seen scientific reconstructions of prehistoric monsters that influenced his work.  Not too much should be inferred, therefore, from this brief article.  The biased interpretation of the scientist is the interesting thing to note: he immediately jumps to a conclusion based on his assumption that the two were millions of years apart.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Which Heating Fuel is Cheaper, Electricity or Natural Gas?

first_imgMost green builders want to choose an environmentally responsible heating fuel, which is why an increasing number of green homes are all-electric. To prevent catastrophic climate change, we need to make a rapid transition away from the burning of fossil fuels (including natural gas, propane, and oil) toward the use of renewable energy (for example, electricity generated by photovoltaic arrays or wind turbines).That said, many builders and homeowners have been using natural gas for heating for many years. Before they make the switch to electricity, they often ask an important question: Which heating fuel is cheaper, natural gas or electricity?In most U.S. states, the answer is natural gas — but there are exceptions. As with most energy-related questions, the accurate answer is, “It depends.”Natural gas is cheap in Alaska, where residential customers pay only $4.68 per 1,000 cubic feet. On the other hand, natural gas is expensive in Florida, where residential customers pay $16.77 per 1,000 cubic feet.Electricity is cheap in Louisiana and Washington, where residential customers pay only 9.7 cents per kWh. On the other hand, electricity is expensive in Connecticut, where residential customers pay 20.3 cents per kWh — more than twice as much as homeowners in Louisiana.When it comes to energy costs, Hawaii is an outlier. All forms of energy are expensive in Hawaii:  natural gas costs residential customers $25.83 per 1,000 cubic feet, while residential electricity costs 29.5 cents per kWh. Fortunately, most Hawaiian residents don’t have to worry about heating fuel costs.If you want to know which heating fuel is cheaper in your area, you have to do the math.Step one: Determine your local fuel prices. You can either look up these prices on your utility bills, call up your local utility, or use the statewide averages shown in the table below.Once you know your fuel… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

Fernandez proud to see Red Lions match Pirates’ big heart

first_imgFor the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netEven with San Beda nearing another title after a Game 1 win, coach Boyet Fernandez refused to shed the underdog tag for his team.The Red Lions dealt Lyceum its first loss of NCAA Season 93, 94-87, and could wrap up the championship series next Thursday.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Read Next LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “We only won one game and we haven’t won a championship yet. So we’re still the underdog,” said Fernandez. “They beat us twice and they’re still the best. If you total it, they’re 18-1 and we’re 17-2. So they’re still the favorites for this.”What Fernandez won’t take away from his boys, though, is the way they fought from behind and pulled away the victory.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSan Beda saw itself down, 62-45 early in the third quarter before Robert Bolick and Donald Tankoua buckled down to work and got their team back in the game, setting up the close finish in the fourth period.“I just give credit to my players today. We’re down by more than 12 points and they never gave up,” he said, applauding how hard the Red Lions worked to put the first dent in the Pirates’ armor. Nguyen knocks out Folayang for ONE lightweight title CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa More than anything, Fernandez is glad to show that his boys also have hearts as big as Lyceum’s in this title retention bid.“People said the heart of LPU is really big, I think the heart of my players are really big as well. So we just matched up on that.”However, with a chance to sweep the Finals series next Thursday, the multi-titled mentor acknowledged that San Beda must up the ante if it wants to close the series out on Game 2.“We’re happy to get this one because it’s my boys who really stepped up in this game. But we need more heart and energy and we have to match them. But it’s going to be our composure, especially the championship experience, which we have to bank on until the end.”ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9303:46Lacson: PH lost about P161.5B tax revenue from big trading partners in 201701:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

WSJ Offers Great Marketing Advice, Then Fails to Follow It

first_img the Wikipedia entry go read it now Most blogs put comments right below their articles. That encourages participation because readers see them after they finish, and dive in. That’s not the case on The Journal’s site. After the article all you see are ads. If you want to comment on the piece, you have to go back to a comment tab at the top of the page. The authors encourage marketers to “Resist the temptation to sell, sell, sell,” yet by placing ads where most sites put the comments, The Journal is doing just that. (3) Ads Take Up Space Most Sites Devote to Comments — and Here’s what I mean: colleges after dozens of interviews with executives and managers. (whatever you say about Wikipedia, it is certainly a conversation). , written by professors from — “Don’t just talk at consumers — work with them throughout the marketing process.” That’s another one of the article’s excellent morsels of advice. Yet the authors fail to follow it. As of late Monday night, they weren’t participating in the comments, which means they’re talking at their readers. There is just one problem with the article: The authors and The Journal aren’t following their own advice. Bentley (1) Very Few Links What do you think? Does the WSJ practice what it preaches? Does HubSpot? Topics: , or, at the very least, Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack . inbound marketing If you haven’t read today’s piece in The Wall Street Journal about marketing on the social web, you should Inbound Marketing — The authors urge marketers to “Listen to — and join — the conversation outside your site.” Yet their entire article includes only two links, and even then they’re not links to related conversations. For example, since they offer a definition of Web 2.0, they should link to Babson Originally published Dec 15, 2008 9:02:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Tim O’Reilly’s seminal post on the topic (2) The Authors Aren’t Participating in the Comments It’s a great summary of many of the principles oflast_img read more

The Science of Social Media [Video]

first_img Stuff like ‘engage in the conversation’ or ‘hug your followers.’ It’s good sounding advice, and hard to disagree with. He says, “I am not going to tell you to punch your customers in the face. The problem is that it’s not based on anything more substantial than what ‘feels right’ typically”. Dan likes to get beyond the unicorns and rainbows, into the real data, the real social media scientist, Dan Zarrella visited Harvard this week and shared some of his research about Originally published Jan 28, 2011 3:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 HubSpot on as it applies to marketing.  Dan attends many events where  people share social media advice and most of it is what he calls ‘unicorns and rainbows.’ Vimeo the science of social media Check out the video below for Dan’s full presentation at Harvard. What do you think about the data he presents? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img Topics: . about why people behave the way they do online and how marketers can leverage that behavior. from HubSpot’s The Science of Social Media Social Media Video science of social medialast_img read more

A Penguin-Damaged Company Makes its SEO Recovery & Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_imgIt may have been a shorter work week than usual, but the inbound marketing news sure didn’t slow down. Between new feature releases on your favorite (or maybe not) social networks, websites still recovering from the recent Google Penguin updates, and the usual thought-provoking inbound marketing content that fills our tweet streams, we have a lot to catch up on. So here’s a distilled version of all that industry awesomeness in case you missed it while trying to squeeze a five-day work week into four ;-)Recovering From an Over Optimization Penalty From SEOmozFirst, let’s visit Nick Eubanks at SEOmoz to learn more about the recent Penguin algorithm update from Google — if you haven’t read it yet, you can get a quick recap here. This post is useful because it gives us a step-by-step walkthrough of how an actual company who was dinged in the SERPs by the Penguin update recovered its listing positions. So if you or one of your clients is struggling with this problem right now, this post will give you insight into how you can begin to repair your organic search presence.Why Enterprise SEO Shouldn’t Focus Solely on Keywords From Search Engine LandContinuing on the SEO train, this blog post by Ian Lurie gives us insight into an oft-overlooked topic — how enterprise organizations should approach SEO. Because it’s different than the approach many SMBs should take, and one critical difference is that there really shouldn’t be an incessant focus on keyword optimization. Plus, it opens with a joke — might as well have a chuckle while you read about site crawls.Facebook and Google+ Feature ChangesMan alive there was a lot of inbound marketing news this week. First, Facebook announced the launch of Promoted Posts that lets us extend the reach of our page content. Then, Google+ rocked our worlds with the death of Google Places, which was officially replaced with Google+ Local. That’s right, local businesses, now you have to use Google+! Muahaha. Finally, Facebook came back again to make our lives easier by allowing us to schedule our posts for the future, and letting us assign page admins to certain roles that limit (or increase) their ability to make changes to our brand’s social presence.Is Pinterest Really Leading to Product Purchases? From eMarketerThere’s been a ton of hoopla around Pinterest as of late, but does it actually lead to product purchases? eMarketer just released some data to let us know! Juicy data? You sure know how to make a marketer swoon, eMarketer.10 Reasons to Develop for Android First From Marketing PilgrimFinally, Craig Palli at Fisku helped add fuel to the Android vs. iOS fire with this post that asserts those developing (or thinking about developing) a mobile app should first develop for Android, not iOS. Sneak peak: the Android market’s bigger, and there are fewer privacy constraints. You’ll have to keep reading for the other 8 reasons!What other good inbound marketing content did you find circling the web this past week?Image credit: NS Newsflash Technical SEO Topics: Originally published Jun 3, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Save Up to 50% on Your PPC With Quality Score

first_img PPC Originally published Aug 19, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: In PPC, there are lots of metrics to track, so it can quickly get confusing and then overwhelming. Marketers often ask me, “What’s the one metric I should optimize for? I just want to know the top one or two levers I can pull to make a difference!”In my experience, looking at thousands of Google AdWords accounts and billions in combined spend, there are two metrics that correlate most strongly with success:Account Activity: You get out what you put in. This isn’t too shocking; advertisers who do more work on their accounts get better results.Quality Score: Higher Quality Scores generally lead to lower costs, so optimizing for Quality Score is essentially the same as optimizing for ROI.Why You Should Spend Time Optimizing for Quality Score Since Quality Score is really a measure of relevance, it’s a powerful predictor of your success. And it makes total sense — Google’s main goal is to keep users happy so they keep using Google, and keep clicking results. More relevant ads, campaigns, and landing pages get more clicks; that raises your Quality Scores and — since Quality Score determines both your ad ranking and what you pay per click — everybody wins.So once you’ve committed to spending more time in your account, what should you spend your time on? I recommend that you focus on optimizing your Quality Scores, which is the metric most likely to lead to higher rankings, more clicks and leads, and lower costs for those actions.How much lower? Let’s take a look.New Data Shows AdWords Quality Score Can Save You Up to 50% on PPCIn 2009, Craig Danuloff crunched some numbers to show that a Quality Score of 10 could save you 30% on cost per click, or CPC. (Sadly, I can’t link to the post because the Click Equations blog now redirects to Acquisio.) But that was over four years ago, and I was curious to see if the data had changed.To investigate, I did a manual analysis of several hundred new clients that WordStream signed up in the first two months of 2013. What I found is that average impression-weighted Quality Scores have fallen in the past four years. In 2009, a Quality Score of 7 (out of 10) was average. But today’s impression-weighted average Quality Score is just slightly over 5. The distribution looks like this: Therefore, accounts (or campaigns or ad groups) with average volume-weighted keyword Quality Scores better than 5 can be considered better than average, and are thereby benefiting relative to most advertisers. Accounts with average Quality Scores lower than 5 are below average, and those scores are detrimental to your account. I used this data to re-run the calculations and see how much a Quality Score higher than 5 saves you on CPC compared to the average advertiser. Here’s what I found: As you can see from the chart, the savings have increased. Some highlights: A Quality Score of 6 is 200% more valuable than it was four years ago! A Quality Score of 6 was previously below average, and increased your CPC by 16.7%. Now, a Quality Score of 6 decreases your CPC by 16.7%. A Quality Score of 9 is twice as valuable as it was in 2009, saving you 44.4% compared to 22.2%. A Quality Score of 10 now saves you a full 50% on CPC. That means if all your keywords had Quality Scores of 10, you’d only be paying half as much as the average advertiser. Pretty crazy, right? And if you’re thinking, “So what? I don’t care about cost per click, all I really care about is cost per acquisition” — fear not. Quality Score lowers your CPA, too. I did a similar analysis based on CPA and found that high Quality Scores also correlate with lower CPAs:With a Quality Score of 10, you’ll pay 80% less per conversion than an advertiser with an average Quality Score of 5. These savings are mostly driven by lower costs per click. This is why optimizing for Quality Score is such a good use of your time.Benchmarking AdWords Quality Score: What Should You Shoot For? As I mentioned above, average Quality Scores these days hover around a 5. So anything higher than 5 is going to benefit you, relative to the average AdWords advertiser. That means you should shoot for a bare minimum impression-weighted average Quality Score of 6. However, it’s important to note that higher scores save you more. If you want the full 50% savings, you need the gold standard Quality Score of 10.The fastest way to find out your impression-weighted average Quality Score in AdWords is to grade your account using the free AdWords Performance Grader. This tool will do an instant audit of your PPC account across 8 different key performance metrics, including impression-weighted Quality Score. Your report will calculate and display your average Quality Score and plot a distribution of the number of impressions happening at each visible Quality Score for the last 90 days, and compare that to a “Recommended Curve” for your business. Here’s an example of what the Quality Score section of the report looks like:If you don’t like what you see (the example account above is well below average), it’s time to start working on improving your scores. Here are three tactics to try: Use ad extensions. AdWords ad extensions, such as sitelinks, make your ads bigger with more places to click, so they increase CTR at no extra cost.Write better ad text. Test different messaging to find the ad text that speaks to your audience. And use your one allotted exclamation point! Bid on brand terms. Branded keywords tend to have really high clickthrough and conversion rates, so they bring up the average for your whole account. This is a guest post written by Larry Kim. Larry is the founder and CTO of WordStream, provider of the 20 Minute PPC Work Week and the AdWords Grader. You can follow him on Twitter and Google+.Image credit: Philip Taylor PTlast_img read more

10 Ways to Make Your Content More Fun to Read

first_img“But I write about mortgages (or some other similarly ‘boring’ topic) — there’s no way I can possibly make my content fun to read.” For many of you in the B2B boat, this is probably an excuse you can easily relate to.But I’m going to fight you on this one because, hey, I’m a B2B content creator, too. And we sell marketing software over here — not exactly the sexiest product to peddle, if you ask me. But we’ve heard time and time again from our readers that they love coming back to our content because we make it fun and interesting to read about marketing.Even companies in “boring” industries need to create content. But the thing is, people who read about mortgages aren’t waking up one day thinking, “I think I’m going to read about mortgages today!” They read that content because they need information about mortgages — maybe because they’re considering buying a house. So why not make the otherwise boring, tedious process of reading about mortgages (or insert your industry here) a little bit more interesting — maybe even fun — for them? After all, everyone loves being entertained, right? And injecting a little bit more fun into your content might even set it apart from some of your competitors’ truly boring content.So without further ado, here are 10 smart ways to make your content more fun to read.10 Ways to Make Your Content More Fun to Read1) Tell a StoryYou may be writing about some boring industry concept, but that doesn’t mean you can’t weave in a little storytelling. Telling stories or anecdotes is a great way to engage your readers and make your content relatable. It also makes your reader realize that behind that stuffy industry concept is a real person who’s writing it.Don’t be afraid to draw from personal experiences — just be sure they relate back and transition well to the topic of your content. Here’s an example of how a colleague of mine, Ginny Soskey, incorporated a personal anecdote to set the stage for the 10 free design tools she highlighted in this post:2) Crack a JokeThis one is a little tougher, as it requires a sense of humor 😉 That being said, you don’t have to be the funniest person in the world to make readers smile here and there. Sometimes, your choice of words or a little parenthetical quip will do the trick. Just loosen up, be yourself, and if you’re not sure whether something is actually humorous, run it by an honest co-worker. Take a look at how my colleague Corey Eridon cracks a joke in a post about a pretty dry topic (CAN-SPAM).3) Use Your Introduction WiselyThe intro of your content is one of your best (and easiest) opportunities to be creative and fun. What’s more, this is the perfect place to do it, since you want your introduction to be compelling and interesting enough to get your readers’ attention (no easy feat, believe me).And, hey — whaddya know? Intros also happen to be great places for cracking jokes and telling stories! You can also consider being empathetic or coming up with another creative way to introduce the reader to what lies in the content ahead of them. The goal is to get the reader to emotionally connect with or relate to the content so they want to keep reading. For more tips about writing great introductions — and an example of a great introduction in and of itself — check out our post, “How to Write an Introduction.”4) Watch Your ToneBoring topics will sound even more boring if you write with a bland tone. In most cases, you can get away with a conversational, informal tone in your writing — especially if the writing is going on a blog, not in an academic paper. Think about how you would communicate with someone verbally, and adopt that tone in your writing. Your readers will thank you for content that, albeit educational, is also easy to read and get through. Isn’t the following so much more enjoyable to read than it would’ve been had we stopped after that first little paragraph?5) Use Fun, Hypothetical Examples On the content team, we like to call these “unicorn examples.” Here’s why: For a while here at HubSpot, we had kind of a unicorn thing going on. The unicorn even turned into somewhat of a mascot for us (we called him Hu). In any event, every time we were looking to enhance our blog content with a hypothetical example to explain a concept more clearly, the example went something like this:Off the wall and totally fun, but still very relevant and helpful in getting our readers to understand how to use analytics to identify the topics they should be blogging about — the topic of the post it appeared in.This approach works particularly well when you’re writing for a variety of personas, because it levels the playing field (since you’re using an example that doesn’t just apply to one particular persona and not the rest).6) Hijack a MemeI’m not gonna lie — I loooove memejacking. Meme-what, you ask? If you’re not familiar, a meme is quite simply a concept, behavior, or idea that spreads, usually via the internet. Memes most commonly manifest themselves in visuals such as images, pictures, or videos, but they can also take the form of a link, hashtag, a simple word or phrase (e.g. an intentional misspelling), or even an entire website. If you’re still having some trouble grasping the concept, check out some of these popular memes. I bet you’ll recognize a few.What’s great about doing some memejacking in your content is the fact that memes are inherently fun, engaging, and wildly popular. But how exactly does one “hijack” a meme? Luckily, we’ve written a detailed blog post on the subject that provides some great memejacking tips and tricks. The great thing is, you can either go big like Moz, which announced its Series B funding through an entirely meme-themed news release …… or like we did with our post about marketing pick-up lines, as told through popular memes.Perhaps you can be a little bit more subtle, sprinkling in a meme reference here and there to add a little fun to your content, like we did in our recent post about what the best bloggers do: 7) Incorporate Pop Culture ReferencesSpeaking of popular memes, how about a little pop culture reference to liven up your content? Here’s an example of how we did this recently in a post about Google’s move to encrypt all keyword search data — not exactly the most uplifting article for marketers, but there was no sense in us being total Debbie Downers about it. A little humor, it turns out, is a great way to help cope with bad news :-)Just be mindful of your target audience with this one (and come to think of it, with memejacking, too). If the majority of your audience won’t have any idea who or what you’re referencing, it’ll be a total flop. Now, you won’t be able to appeal to everyone, but use your best judgment and keep your personas in mind when making pop culture references like these.8) Get Creative With Images You know what they say: “A picture is worth a thousand words.” Imagery is not only a great way to improve the social shareability of your content, but it can also add a little fun to it, too. Take some extra care in choosing images for your content. Can you use them to enhance a joke you made or crack a new one? Can you simply select a relevant image that’s already funny in and of itself? Can you overlay a caption or add a clever thought/talk bubble like we did in the example below (which can be found in this blog post)? Don’t be afraid to get creative! (Image Credit: horslips5)Just be sure you have the right permissions to use, adapt, or modify the images you’re using. Use photos appropriately licensed under Creative Commons (but be careful), or purchase stock photos. (Bonus: We have 235 stock photos available to download for free here and here that you can adapt however you’d like!)9) Add a GIFHow fun is the GIF pictured below? Writing Skills Originally published Oct 2, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated August 27 2017 Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack We added it to the blog post and landing page for our marketing trivia game offer to give it a little oomph and emphasize its game show-esque look and feel. Animated GIFs are great for catching readers’ attention and making your content just a little bit more interesting. To learn how to create an animated GIF, check out this simple how-to blog post. And to learn more about how to use them in your marketing, this post will do the trick.10) Hide Easter Eggs No, I’m not talking about colorful, hard-boiled eggs here. In the internet world, an Easter egg refers to “an intentional inside joke, hidden message, or feature.” And from the reader’s perspective, there’s nothing more fun than a well-hidden Easter egg. You know why? Because there’s a sense of exclusivity associated with them. It also makes you feel wicked smart when you actually discover one! Hiding Easter eggs adds a fabulous level of interactivity to your content, and it’s also a great way to engage your readers and get them to come back.One of my favorite Easter egg examples was hidden in the launch campaign for the return season of Arrested Development. In these examples, the brilliant marketers of the show hid messages to fans — quotes from character Tobias Fünke — in the code of the microsites that were created for the campaign:(The above message reads, “Are you looking at my privates? Shame on YOU sir!”)You don’t have to get as fancy as hiding messages in your website’s source code either — even just hidden messages that certain personas or long-time readers of your content would “get” can be a fun, yet simple, approach. Just be sure that any Easter eggs you hide not only appeal to your target audience, but also enhance (not take away from) your content.What other suggestions do you have for injecting more “fun” into your content?last_img read more

How to Calculate Next Month’s Lead Gen Goal [Quick Tip]

first_img Business Calculators Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Today is stressful — it’s the end of the month. Maybe you had a fabulous month where traffic and leads flowed in without you lifting a finger. Maybe you worked your tail off to hit your goal and you just made it. Or maybe, despite your hard work, you came in under the waterfall line. Regardless of how this month went, today is stressful.Easily build and embed forms on your site. Try HubSpot Forms for free.Tomorrow, your score gets set back to zero — but first, you’ve got to figure out what your leads goal is actually going to be. You shouldn’t just pick a number out of thin air, or even assume that you should be increasing your previous month by X%. There’s a much better way to figure it out that’s rooted in your company’s larger goals. Keep on reading to figure how to simply and scientifically calculate next month’s lead goal. (If you want an easy-to-use template to calculate these numbers for you, download one here.) Find Your Leads Goal by Working BackwardsThe key to figuring out your lead goal is all about working backwards. Figure out how much revenue your team needs to contribute to the company’s bottom line, and then use some simple math to work your way back up the funnel. Here’s how you can calculate it.Step 1: Figure out how much revenue your team needs to contribute. Ask your sales leadership how much revenue Sales needs to book this month and how much of that needs to come from inbound marketing. For this example, let’s say your sales team needs to generate $100,000 in revenue with 80% of it coming from inbound.$100,000 in revenue * .8 = $80,000 inbound revenue. Step 2: Figure out how many customers you need to close to satisfy that revenue. Next, you need to figure out roughly how many customers you need to close to generate that revenue. To do that, you’ll divide the number from the previous step by the average revenue generated per customer. Here’s what that looks like in the example we’re using:$80,000 inbound revenue / $16,000 revenue per customer = 5 customersThis means that you need to close five customers to create that much inbound revenue. Step 3: Figure out how many leads you need in order to close that many customers. Then, you need to work your way up one step in the marketing funnel to figure out how many leads you need to get to generate that many customers. To do this, you’ll need your average lead-to-customer conversion rate — aka the percentage of leads that become customers. For example’s sake, let’s say your lead-to-customer-conversion rate is 2%. Then, you’d figure out how many leads you need by completing this equation:5 customers / .02 lead-to-customer conversion rate = 250 leadsTa-da! You have your lead goal for the month, unless you choose to complete the next step. Otherwise, skip to Step 5.  Step 4 (Optional): Adjust the goal to reflect the previous month’s progress.Some people prefer to adjust this number based on whether they hit the goal the previous month to help increase employee morale — if your team isn’t hitting your goals one month, it can be demotivating to see the waterfall line climb even higher the next month. That being said, adjusting it each month could give your team a false sense of security if they’re trending each month, as it may make you still miss your long-term lead goals. It’s all personal preference on what you decide to do, but keep these considerations in mind while you’re setting these goals. Step 5: Add your leads goal to a waterfall graph. Last, but certainly not least, you should add your final lead total to a waterfall graph that gets distributed to your team. This way, everyone can see how you’re trending toward your end of month goal throughout the month and react accordingly. If you have HubSpot, setting up a waterfall graph is easy to do in the Reports tool, and you can automatically send out daily waterfall updates to teammates. You can create on using Excel and manually update your team on their progress. And that’s it, folks! You don’t have to guesstimate your goals anymore. You can use this simple, scientific calculation every month to give accurate projections to your sales team and encourage your team to drive significant, measurable results. Good luck next month! Topics: Originally published Apr 30, 2014 3:30:00 PM, updated July 28 2017last_img read more

If Everyone Hates Selfies, Why Do They Get So Many Likes?

first_img Originally published Dec 8, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Content Creation Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Almost immediately after “selfies” became a thing, people started bashing them. And sure, that kind of makes sense – there’s something mockery-worthy about taking lots of photos of yourself.But if selfies are so silly, why do they get so much social media engagement (likes, retweets, etc.)? I have a couple of theories, and I’m going to share them with you.1) People like peopleAh, humans. We’re just naturally social, and we want to look at other people (and ourselves – hence the selfie). What other explanation could there be for TMZ?Online, selfies and pictures of people in general get more engagement in the form of likes and comments. A Georgia Institute of Technology study found that Instagram pictures with human faces are 38% more likely to get likes and 32% more likely to get comments than photos with no faces.Social media itself fulfills the need and desire to connect with other people, and it’s easier to do that when you’re looking at an actual person rather than a picture of someone’s lunch order. Basically, this theory boils down to “Hey, look – you have eyes and ears and a nose just like I do! We should be friends!”2) You’re really real!Socialmedialand is a place where we can connect with new people every day, many of whom we don’t know in real life.In any case, pictures of your face allow all people to connect or reconnect with you as a person instead of as a tweet or Facebook post. Sharing selfies is a way of saying, “Hello! This is me, @DrifterMama, and I’m more than just 140 characters of text. I’m a person, too!”Seeing the faces of your virtual friends (which I have more of than real friends) helps you connect with them on a personal level, rather than follow them as a faceless feed of information.3) It’s all about the context, babyThe context of your selfie could also be the reason it’s getting a fair amount of engagement. Are you at #Bonnaroo, or is it your #Birthday? Maybe it’s #TBT (Throwback Thursday) or the ever-popular #MCM/#WCW (Man Crush Monday/Woman Crush Wednesday)?The context, of course, doesn’t have to be connected to a popular hashtag. Life events can impact engagement more than attaching your selfie to a trending topic. Celebrating an occurrence in the moment tends to spread more virally, whether it’s a newly-adopted pet or just an amazing summer day.The context of the image makes people feel good and relate the image to their own lives, compelling them to engage with the photo. Creating context around a selfie makes it feel less like a plea for attention, and more like you’re telling a story.The end… or just the beginning?A lot has been written about improving your selfies, and in my opinion, this post by Dan Zarrella on “The Science of Selfies” is the best of the bunch. In it, he breaks down data from over 160,000 images with the #selfie tag and points out which colors, filters, and hashtags result in the most likes. It’s a great read that helps us understand the psychology behind why people like selfies, and what pushes them over the edge into selfie-hate.Whether you’re snapping a picture of yourself with a friend during a night out or sharing a new hairstyle, selfies have become a staple of social media sharing. After all, if you didn’t take a selfie, how will you prove that it really happened?What are your theories on why selfies are so popular?last_img read more