Raiders mailbag: Talking Carr, Gruden’s biceps, Abram and more

first_img1. @jobrelatedtweet: How does Tom Cable still have a job?If he can’t get this year’s Raiders offensive line to be any good, then he’ll be shown the door. He had two rookie tackles and an array of … With about a month and a half until training camp (and Hard Knocks) kicks off in Napa, let’s run through one last mailbag before everyone goes on vacation.In this edition we talk everything from rookies to potential surprise cuts to pass-rushing improvements.Let’s have some fun.last_img

The Best Velocity for Moving Air Through Ducts, Part 1

first_imgIt’s obvious that moving air too quickly through ducts can be a problem. Faster air means more turbulence, more resistance, and more noise. But I run into a lot of people who think that low velocity also can be a problem in ducts. Just recently I heard someone talking about how low velocity causes “rolling air” in the ducts. I don’t know what he meant by that (turbulence, perhaps?), but is low velocity really something we should worry about? And if so, when?Bigger ducts, lower velocityI’ve written about the relationship between velocity and duct size before, so let’s take a quick look back at this important principle. The diagram below shows equal volumes of air in two parts of a duct system—one smaller, one larger. What can we say about the air flow in the two places?One thing we know is that if we have an air flow rate through one part of a duct and no air leaks out or is diverted through another duct, the rate at other parts of the duct must be the same. In other words, if we have 100 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of air flow in the larger piece of duct below, then the air must still flowing at 100 cfm when it gets into the smaller duct. That stems from the Law of Conservation of Mass and the good assumption that air flow in ducts happens at constant density.The continuity equation relates the velocity of air in a duct to the cross-sectional area. Photo: Energy VanguardIf the air flow rate is constant, it’s straightforward to show that the quantity A x v is constant, too.  That’s what we call the continuity equation. The simple way of stating this principle is:As duct size decreases, air velocity increases, and vice versa.So we can increase the velocity of air in a duct by making the ducts smaller and we can reduce the velocity by making the ducts bigger. But what does duct size do to static pressure drops?Static pressure drops, equivalent lengths, and velocityStatic pressure drops are the key quantity to worry about with moving air through ducts for a simple reason. The continuity equation tells us that the air flow rate stays constant from one part of a duct to another. But that doesn’t mean the air flow is a constant.What I mean here is that the air flow rate depends on the resistance to air flow in the duct system, and static pressure is a measure of that resistance. When we reduce the size of a duct or put a fitting in that turns or divides the air or even just move the air through a straight section of duct, we add resistance.Adding that smaller diameter section to the duct above, for example, increases the resistance and decreases the air flow from what it would have been had we kept the duct the same, larger size. So if 100 cfm of air flows through the configuration above, more than 100 cfm would be flowing if the duct hadn’t gotten smaller.The more common way of talking about that resistance in ducts is by total effective length (TEL), which is the sum of the equivalent lengths of fittings and the actual lengths of straight sections. And as I’ve discussed before, the equivalent lengths of fittings dominate, as the straight sections add little to the total resistance (unless the straight sections are flex duct not pulled tight).Now, here’s one more principle we need:The static pressure drop across any one part of a duct system (fitting or straight section) is proportional to the square of the air flow rate.And the continuity equation above tells us that the air flow rate is proportional to the velocity. So in a component of constant size (say, a 12 in. diameter elbow), the static pressure drop is proportional to the square of velocity.I apologize for making you think through a little bit of math here, but hey, we’re not using spherical Bessel functions to solve Schrödinger’s equation in three dimensions. Stick with me a bit longer and this will make you a better person.Let’s do this with numbers, which always seems to help. Say you have air moving at 900 ft. per minute (fpm) through that elbow. The static pressure drop of the air moving through it is proportional to 900 fpm squared. The result of multiplying 900 by itself doesn’t really matter (it’s 810,000) because there’s also a constant of proportionality involved and we’re not going down that path.We can write this relationship out as:Δp ~ 900^2Here, Δp is the change in pressure (or static pressure drop) and 900^2 means squared, or 900 x 900. What really matters here is what happens when we change the velocity. Instead of using 900 fpm, let’s say the air moves through that fitting at 450 fpm. How does that change the static pressure drop?  Here’s the answer:Δp ~ 450^2 = (0.5 x 900)^2 = 0.25 x 900^2Now we can extract one of the most important lessons of this article:When you cut the velocity in half, the static pressure drop is cut to a quarter of what it was.In other words, bigger ducts and lower velocities are better for static pressure than you might have guessed. And guess what? All those equivalent lengths for fittings you can find in ACCA Manual D are based on a velocity of 900 fpm. If you move the air at half that velocity, the actual equivalent length is a quarter of what’s stated in the tables.How would you like to use a fitting with 10 ft. of equivalent length instead of 40 ft.?  Just move the air through it at 450 fpm instead of 900 fpm and that’s what you get!  (Unfortunately, HVAC design software may not make that adjustment for you, using the equivalent length for 900 fpm no matter what the actual velocity is. I know RightSuite Universal doesn’t do it.)What? Me Worry?If you’re worried about low velocity in ducts you design or install, take some advice from Alfred E. Neuman. Whenever you’re concerned about the velocity being too low, think, “What, me worry?”If it’s throw from the register and mixing in the room that worry you, here are two reasons to relax your mind. First, the velocity of air entering the room is generated by the boot and the register. It’s just like putting your thumb over the end of a garden hose to shoot the water farther in the yard. Second, throw from the register isn’t nearly as important in homes with airtight, well-insulated building enclosures with modern windows that meet today’s codes. Admittedly, that’s still a small percentage of all the homes out there, but the better the enclosure, the less important throw becomes.And I’ll give ACCA Manual D the next-to-last word on this topic. Appendix 15 of the Third Edition, Version 2.50 is titled Air Velocity for Ducts and Grilles. Those three and a half pages cover the continuity equation, the benefits of low velocity, balancing dampers, and more. The appendix ends with these words of advice:There are scores of things to worry about when designing and installing a comfort system.  Low velocity through a duct airway is not one of them.But there is another important factor besides static pressure that should govern the velocity at which you move air through ducts. And that’s for the next article.But sometimes you should worrySo I’ve made the argument that low velocity isn’t something to worry about, but that’s not entirely true.  Yes, in terms of getting good air flow in the duct, you really can’t go too low.  But there’s another important factor besides static pressure that should govern the velocity at which you move air through ducts.  And that’s for the next article.Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

Five M.P. cops suspended for death of Dalit man

first_imgFive police personnel have been suspended in connection with the death a 22-year-old Dalit man who was a suspect in a theft case, a senior Madhya Pradesh police officer said on Wednesday. Family members of the deceased Sanju Tipaniya have alleged that he died due to thrashing by the police personnel at Gandhi Nagar police station. West Superintendent of Police Suraj Verma said that Tipaniya was brought to the police station on Tuesday in connection with a theft case. Explaining the sequence of events, he said Tipaniya felt uneasy during questioning, following which a doctor was summoned. “The doctor detected low blood pressure as the cause for Tipaniya losing his consciousness,” he said. The SP added that Tipaniya was then taken to a nearby hospital and later to the State-run Maharaja Yeshwantrao Hospital, but he could not be saved. He said Gandhi Nagar police station in-charge Neeta Deyarwal and four constables have been suspended. Meanwhile, family members of the deceased staged a protest demanding that a case of murder be registered against the policemen. A magisterial inquiry has been ordered.last_img read more

It was tough, physically: Dravid on his ton

first_imgDrained after hitting another one of his typically resolute hundreds, veteran Indian batsman Rahul Dravid said it was tough adjusting to the conditions in the ongoing first cricket Test against the West Indies here.Dravid, for whom the 112-run knock on the third day of the match on Wednesday was his 32nd Test century, confessed he found the effort physically very demanding at the Sabina Park.”It was tough physically. I came here just three days ago. The jet lag, getting up early morning, having not played a Test for a long time and playing in these hot conditions has been very tiring,” remarked Dravid, who batted for over 400 minutes for his 112 runs and hit 10 fours and a six from the 274 balls he faced.”You could do as much physical workout; do the bike and gym and run laps of ground but the sheer effort of batting and fielding and staying on the field and then immediately come to bat, needs practice.”I sweat a lot so physically it’s always been a contest for me. That’s why I have to work harder on my fitness for I know the way I bat, I have to stay in for long periods.””But it was a big Test match and I was fired up…I felt as if I was in my space. Hopefully, we can win the Test and get a day’s rest.”Dravid’s example was lost on young batsmen, such as Virat Kohli and Suresh Raina, who are seen as India’s next generation of Test batsmen.advertisement”I try telling them (the youngsters) to weather the storm; go through the intensity of a spell which might last 8-10-12 overs.” .You fight your way and then it becomes easy. It’s easy to get caught up when things around you are buzzing with noise; balls are flying and spinners are getting big help. You then start thinking it’s hard. But if you last it out, it becomes easier,” Dravid said.”Today in the morning, Ravi Rampaul kept it tight. I knew I had to go through that spell. You need to back yourself; need to enjoy the contest. It’s going to get easier and then you must be there to capitalise on it,” said Dravid, allowing a rare peek in his batting methodology.”I remember in Johannesburg (in 1997), Donald and Pollock were bowling a great spell and I thought it was really tough and I would never be able to play. You need to get through it, fight your way, grit your teeth. Suddenly, it gets easier.”Dravid managed to make 148 runs in that Test which happened to be his first century in his ninth match.Dravid claimed the intensity of the contest at Sabina Park, ironically, helped him get into his space.”I love the contest. When you are back to the wall, it improves your concentration, your focus. It helped me focus my mind, get it in the right place and I felt in control.”For long periods of time, I didn’t score many runs but considering the wicket it probably was the right thing. “Interestingly, Dravid didn’t find it a demand that he rarely received support from his teammates at the other end.”It doesn’t make a difference to me, what’s happening at the other end. My job is to focus. But when you lose wickets, it’s the opposition who picks up. When a new batsman comes in, you know the rivals have got their game together and there would be another 12-14 overs of intensity.” .Dravid also explained the reason of his refusal to take singles when Amit Mishra came in to bat.”I was refusing singles of the first two balls. Sometimes it relaxes bowlers and I was hoping it would give me a four-scoring opportunity.”The stand with Mishra turned out to be a critical one as 56 runs came for the ninth wicket and not only Dravid could get to his century but also the lead stretched beyond 300 runs.Dravid termed it a good cricketing pitch, though slightly in favour of bowlers.”It’s a good cricket wicket. It’s slightly in favour of bowlers and that’s how it should be. The spinners are getting turn; pacers are getting bounce. If you bowl in right areas, it’s difficult for batsmen. If you bowl badly, because of the bounce, the batters can capitalise.”The veteran middle-order batsman though felt his team held the advantage in this Test.”If we get early wickets, we can run through. But we know Shivnarine Chanderpaul is a dangerous player. They have got some good young players. From our perspective, if we bowl in the right areas, we will create opportunity.advertisement”We need to be patient and make batsmen play all the time.”Dravid singled out Ishant Sharma and Praveen Kumar for their bowling effort in this Test so far.”Ishant has been very impressive. Today his bowling was terrific. Praveen is a very skillful, crafty, clever bowler.”- With inputs from PTIFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

Are Your Conversion Rates Competitive? Find Out. Take the HubSpot Inbound Marketing Survey.

first_img The ticket winners will be announced a week from today. Winners of the cash prizes will be announced when the survey closes on Sept 22. Folks who complete the survey within the next week will be eligible for both prizes; if you complete it after that, you’ll only be eligible for the cash. . in Cambridge, MA, on Sept 8, and four $500 cash prizes.  Topics: How does your marketing mix or conversion rate compare with your industry’s average? We’ll collect responses, then send you the results so you can see how your company stacks up. To provide some benchmarks and help you answer those questions, today we’re launching the . But how does your system stack up with the competition? If you’d like to know how your conversion rates, your marketing mix or your inbound marketing strategies compare with other companies in your industry, take five minutes to complete In case that’s not incentive enough, we’re giving away six great prizes to people who complete the survey — two tickets to the HubSpot Inbound Marketing Survey So what are you waiting to for? Get on over to the survey and Originally published Aug 13, 2008 9:57:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Inbound Marketing Summit win those prizes ! If you’re a savvy marketer, you have a range of online tools and techniques you use to reach new customers efficiently. Conversion Rate Optimization this easy survey Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

WSJ Offers Great Marketing Advice, Then Fails to Follow It

first_img the Wikipedia entry go read it now Most blogs put comments right below their articles. That encourages participation because readers see them after they finish, and dive in. That’s not the case on The Journal’s site. After the article all you see are ads. If you want to comment on the piece, you have to go back to a comment tab at the top of the page. The authors encourage marketers to “Resist the temptation to sell, sell, sell,” yet by placing ads where most sites put the comments, The Journal is doing just that. (3) Ads Take Up Space Most Sites Devote to Comments — and Here’s what I mean: colleges after dozens of interviews with executives and managers. (whatever you say about Wikipedia, it is certainly a conversation). , written by professors from — “Don’t just talk at consumers — work with them throughout the marketing process.” That’s another one of the article’s excellent morsels of advice. Yet the authors fail to follow it. As of late Monday night, they weren’t participating in the comments, which means they’re talking at their readers. There is just one problem with the article: The authors and The Journal aren’t following their own advice. Bentley (1) Very Few Links What do you think? Does the WSJ practice what it preaches? Does HubSpot? Topics: , or, at the very least, Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack . inbound marketing If you haven’t read today’s piece in The Wall Street Journal about marketing on the social web, you should Inbound Marketing — The authors urge marketers to “Listen to — and join — the conversation outside your site.” Yet their entire article includes only two links, and even then they’re not links to related conversations. For example, since they offer a definition of Web 2.0, they should link to Babson Originally published Dec 15, 2008 9:02:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Tim O’Reilly’s seminal post on the topic (2) The Authors Aren’t Participating in the Comments It’s a great summary of many of the principles oflast_img read more

HubSpot TV – Enterprise 2.0 with Guest Andrew McAfee

first_img Doing It Right “ChrisHeuer and his wife Kristy, run the Social Media Club. They wanted tofind a way to save money on hotels in Paris. They found a house forrent, which cost something around 5,000 Euros, and they got severalsponsors, largely PayPal, to pick up most of the costs for the house,which they branded “the Social Media Club House.”” @ Intro in your tweet. mvolpe “CarnivalCruise Line is introducing a new social media policy in 2010 thatprohibits partners from using any Carnival trademark or intellectualproperty on social media websites including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin – without prior written approval.” Download the free kit Special Guest: Marketing Takeaway: with Subscribe in iTunes: , @ “BluDot, a furniture maker based in Minneapolis, found out with its “RealGood Experiment,” which it developed with branding firm Mono. Theexperiment was equal parts marketing campaign for the chairs, whichretail for $129, and research into the recession-friendly phenomenon of”curb mining” — the practice of nabbing household items left on streetcorners.” NOTE FROM THE PRODUCERS:We are doing a special Holiday episode live today Wednesday, December 23rd at 4:00pm ET. Check out the show at www.hubspot.tv. New day and time for HubSpot TV next week: December 23rd, 4PM Closing Enterprise 2.0: New Collaborative Tools for Your Organization’s Toughest Challenges  Big brands turn to small blog houses for big results How to interact on Twitter: @ http://andrewmcafee.org A GPS Experiment Busts Street Thieves “All told, Blu Dot believes the experimentgenerated nearly 60 million Web impressions, including blogs andTwitter posts. Unique visitors to its site tripled in the first fewdays of the experiment.” Leverage Enterprise 2.0 thinking in your business. www.HubSpot.tv (Episode Length: 24 minutes, 41 seconds) Carnival Cruise Lines Releases a Restrictive New Social Media Policy for Travel Agents. amcafee Marketing Tip of the Week: Carnival Titanics Their Marketing “Whatwould happen if a furniture company left 24 designer chairs, manyequipped with GPS tracking technology, on the streets of New York?” 5 Business Benefits of Twitter’s New Feature ‘Contributors’ (Launching Soon!) http://itunes.hubspot.tv/ and @ Episode #71 – December 18, 2009 amcafee Andrew McAfee Marketing Takeaway: Marketing in a Downturn Strategy Kit Big Brands Playing Small Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack “Pepsi’sSuper Bowl streak is over after a 23-year run. Ads for the drinks won’tappear in next year’s Super Bowl on CBS. Instead, the company plans toshift ad dollars to a new marketing effort that’s mostly online.” “There was some concern it wouldn’tmake an impression beyond “design hipsters,” but Blu Dot found it wasgetting attention from the tech community, including Fast Company and asecurity blog.” “Twitterwill be releasing a new feature called “Contributors,” which allowsmultiple users to contribute to a single company Twitter account.(Woohoo!)” Twitter Encourages Contribution “What didPayPal get? Mentions on our blogs and Twitter accounts, but a privatedinner where they got to know us away from the hustle and bustle oftheir show floor exhibit.” karenrubin Small is the new big. Richer relationships with fewer people trumps interruption advertising to millions. You can’t control your brand, and doing so limits your exposure. for tips and tricks to generate more leads efficiently and inexpensively. Pepsi turns ad focus online Headlines Learn how to get the most out of a tight marketing budget. “ShipperFedEx also said Thursday it will not advertise again in the Super Bowldue to costs, the same reason the company gave for sitting it out lasttime around.” Make sure you have both individual and company Twitter accounts! Originally published Dec 23, 2009 3:00:00 PM, updated July 04 2013 Marketing Takeaway:last_img read more

Understanding Social Gaming’s Marketing Application

first_img , business phone systems 7-Eleven teamed up with Farmville creator Zynga to, “allow millions of consumers the ability to redeem exclusive virtual items with Zynga games Topics: According to the Facebook page participants will, “date 60 different characters, including MTV CAST MEMBERS. Ask them questions, and then rate their answers. The I Woo You Meter lets you know if you’re a match. Go on a date and post your date photo on your wall.”  As a marketer one of your duties is to get your company’s brand awareness out to the right audience—and that is sometimes easier said than done.  Staying up to date on the latest tactics is a must for your niche market, and social media seems to be the golden child for some.  Although this is true, I think most of us are getting tired of reading about how Twitter will make your company thousands of dollars a week. Nielsen found that One of the main reasons many companies do not participate in social media in general is they can’t tie it to any type of ROI.  This is largely due to the fact that they don’t define any reason for participating other than other companies are doing it.  , said, “the true strategic question is how does your brand engage with your audience in a relevant and valuable way? We feel that this is one of those ways for us to be able to do that in a fun and engaging manner.” Resource Nation Depending on your company’s target audience, social media games could be a great way to keep them engaged in your brand and help with word-of-mouth marketing (which is why social media can do so well).  MTV is the latest company to roll out a to, “give 10 free Facebook Credits in exchange for trading their coins for a cash voucher at one of 10,000 Coinstar locations, which are usually in grocery stores. That’s about $1 in value. On the back of the voucher ticket, you get a web address that you can enter on your computer. Then you claim your Facebook Credits and can proceed to use them in games and other apps on Facebook.” Chances are if your major competitors are engaging in social media, you should be as well.  Before you dive in, make sure you take the time to plan out any initiatives you will be doing. (tweeting, blogs, creating games etc.) Start out small and test the waters before dumping a large amount of money into social media campaigns.  You might not be a heavy hitter like MTV and 7-Eleven, but that doesn’t mean social media games could be a waste of time for you.  Take the time to research and plan and you could be seeing a great benefit from these games. MTV is not the first to implement these type of games. At the beginning of summer, based in San Diego, California.  She writes extensively for Originally published Sep 16, 2010 3:00:00 PM, updated March 21 2013center_img Facebook game What’s the Point? (Farmville and Mafia wars) at their local 7-Eleven store.”  Rixty has decided to team up with Coinstar Social Media What to Look ForBefore implementing a social game you need to have two main points defined—is your target audience participating in social games, and how will you measure its success.  If you can define these two points, you will be able to decide how and if a social game can bring in revenue.  Taking the lead from this promotion, Damon Burrell, VP of marketing at MTV , “online games overtook personal email to become the second most heavily used activity behind social networks – accounting for 10 percent of all U.S. Internet time. Email dropped from 11.5 percent of time to 8.3 percent.”  entitled, “I Woo You.” an online resource that provides expert advice on purchasing and outsourcing decisions. The following is a guest post by Shannon Suetos is an expert writer on So why are these heavy hitters participating in social games?  Well like Burell said above, it helps customers engage with your brand.  It is also a great way to collect information such as email addresses and other contact information—better than purchased lists and outbound marketing. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

7 Tips for Growing Your Email List With Sweepstakes

first_imgThis is a guest post written by Ross Kramer, co-founder and CEO of Lititz, PA-based email marketing firm, Listrak.After working in the industry for more than 15 years, you learn countless tips and tricks to boost customer engagement and company revenue. But there’s one key lesson that all inbound marketers need to learn – how to multiply their email list. I know what you’re thinking. Could we get any more low level? But successful email list development and strategy can make the difference between campaign successes or failures.Even seasoned email marketers who follow best practices for email list development, relevancy, and deliverability still lose about one-third of their subscribers annually due to bounces, unsubscribes, and spam complaints, according to the Email Experience Council. And the attrition rates are even higher for less vigilant marketers.Luckily, there are strategies proven to quickly acquire qualified subscribers and keep them longer. Among these include sweepstakes, contests, or other viral campaigns. But before you decide to run a sweepstakes strategy of your own, consider these 7 tips to make sure you know how to run a successful one that will help you grow your email list with qualified subscribers.1. Keep it SimpleWhile it might be tempting to create a contest that runs for several weeks, sweepstakes that are strategic, targeted, and time-sensitive give the appearance of exclusivity and prompt people to respond quickly. In order to maximize list development during a short time period, you must have a plan in place prior to launch that includes automated emails, banner ads, social and mobile announcements, etc.2. Make it PersonalA cash prize may entice more entrants to your sweepstakes, but by awarding your own merchandise instead, you will get a more qualified group that is clearly interested in your company’s brand and what it has to offer.3. Encourage Social SharingEmail and social media can really complement each other. Offer your members some incentive such as a second entry or a free gift if they invite friends and other connections in their social networks to participate. This tactic will greatly expand the reach of your campaign. However, be sure to maintain control of the contest. Provide a form to capture the additional email addresses and immediately send those subscribers a message with the details of the contest and an easy way to enter.4. Promote in the Right ChannelsWhile email is the most effective communication channel to promote the sweepstakes to your subscribers and members, it shouldn’t be your only channel.  Announce your contest on your blog and in your social media and mobile networks, and include banner ads on your website and other relevant sites.5. Send Entry ConfirmationsOne of the most important steps in this whole process is sending email confirmations to all entrants. The last thing you want to do is add invalid email addresses to your list because the increase in bounces will negatively affect your deliverability. An automated confirmation email will safeguard your reputation and ensure that only legitimate email addresses are added to your list and only real people are entered into your sweepstakes. Also, if you’re worried about bots inundating your sweepstakes with junk email addresses, a simple CAPTCHA on the registration form will prevent that.6. Welcome Your New SubscribersSubscribers are most engaged within the first few weeks of opting in, so you should use this time to start building the relationship right away. An email welcome series designed to engage and interact with subscribers should be part of your usual email development process, but it is especially important when running a sweepstakes. A welcome email will help you weed out the entrants who were only interested in the contest since it gives uninterested subscribers an opportunity to opt-out and provides valuable open and click-through data so you can measure engagement. That way, you’ll be able to focus your attention on the subscribers who are most likely to purchase from you.7. Monitor New SubscribersWe’ve seen a well planned sweepstakes grow lists by 30% or more in a matter of days. That said, even if you follow best practices for attracting the appropriate entrants for your brand, you’ll still get a number of invalid email addresses and people who are only interested in the prize. In order to protect your reputation, closely monitor the results of your confirmation email and welcome series (not only open and click-through rates, but also bounces, complaints, and unsubscribes), and watch the inactivity levels for the new subscribers. If they don’t show interest in your messages, try a re-engagement campaign or remove them from your list.Have you found success through sweepstakes? How many qualified email addresses did you gain?Photo Credit: Ian Lamont Originally published Aug 25, 2011 3:02:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Email Lists and Segmentation Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

What’s the Deal With This Whole ‘Context Marketing’ Thing?

first_imgSeveral years ago (in internet years, anyway) it became clear to some marketers that one of the best ways to capture market share was through creating amazing content. Whether through blog posts, ebooks, social media, cartoons, videos, whatever — helpful, educational, and interesting content was the name of the marketing game.Today, I think it’s fair to say that not just some, but most marketers are on board with this whole “content-is-important-for-marketing” thing. Our 2012 State of Inbound Marketing Report, for example, showed that the average budget spent on company blogs and social media increased from 9% in 2009, to 21% in 2012. Furthermore, over 81% of marketers in the survey named their company blog as “useful” or better to their business. And LinkedIn, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter were considered “useful” or better by over 60%. Cool, so it seems like a good chunk of us are on board and rocking it with content. So …… What next? For a while now, the industry has been leading up to the next phase of marketing that is finally here in full swing — context marketing. Whether you know what that means or not (no worries, we’re about to tell you), I think you’ll find that it’s something you’ve either dabbled in, or wanted to dabble in, for some time. But now, there’s actually plenty of technology available to do more than just dabble in it! So this post is going to introduce you to the concept of context marketing, and show you just how powerful it can be if you incorporate it into your marketing strategy.What Is Context Marketing?Context marketing is using context in your marketing.:-)Okay, I’m being a little silly with that definition, but that is what it is. Actually, my favorite definition of context marketing is delivering the right content, to the right people, at the right time. Let me explain what I mean by context a little more, though.Context marketing is like a spelling bee …When you have context around something, you have a larger, more telling picture — you know, those little details that help lend more clarity to things that would otherwise be pretty general, unspecific, and, well, uninteresting. Let’s use a spelling bee as an analogy here. If a judge asks a kid to spell the word “pour,” he might want to ask a host of questions to get more context before answering. What’s the part of speech? What’s the definition? Can you use it in a sentence, please? Answers to those questions all provide context that helps paint a clearer picture of the word he’s trying to spell.And it’s important context, too! Why? Because the word “pour” is different than the word “pore” — or “poor.” Without getting more context around what the judge is asking, how could that kid possibly provide an accurate answer? Getting more context around that word would be pretty useful to helping our kid become a spelling bee champ! And the same goes for your marketing. Do you want to be a marketing champ like our spelling bee friend? Or a marketing chump who sends emails about pore cleansing strips or poor lost puppies instead of new water faucets that pour ionized water?Context Marketing Champ, or Chump?The marketing champs in every industry are the ones who are leveraging context about their audience, leads, and customers in their marketing. For example, a marketer using context would know more about a lead than whether she’s B2B or B2C, and her first name. They might also know what industry she works in, what kind of content she likes best, through what channel she prefers to consume content, whether she’s currently using another solution to meet her needs, and whether her company has budget at this time of year.As a marketer, if you were asked to “market” to someone, and all you were given was a first name and that she works for a B2B company, wouldn’t your first question be … what else do we know about her? Probably, if you want to do your job way better. That’s the idea behind context marketing: Using what you know about your contacts to provide supremely relevant, targeted, and personalized marketing.Why Is Context Marketing Important?Context marketing is important for many reasons, but here are the two that I think trump them all:When you have context around your relationship with a contact, you’re able to provide more personalized and relevant marketing content that’s targeted at their needs. Personalized and relevant marketing is the foundation for creating marketing people love! What’s more, personalized and relevant marketing is typically not the kind of marketing that annoys the living daylights out of people. Win-win!When you’re creating marketing that’s targeted at people’s point of need, it stands to reason that marketing will perform much better for you, because you aren’t delivering marketing content that’s misaligned with their interests or stage in the sales cycle. Think about it: If you know that our B2B lead from the previous section is getting new budget in January, she’s downloaded a couple buying guides in the past two weeks, she’s visited your product pages, and it’s December, you’re able to send her insanely targeted content that addresses her needs — like, say, an offer for a custom end of year demo of your product with a rep that specializes in the finance industry — content that she’s pretty likely to convert on.Why not use the context around your relationships with your contacts to create marketing that they 1) love, and 2) convert on?How Would One “Do” Context Marketing?Alright, these ideas all sound lovely, but how does this “context marketing” theory manifest itself? What would it look like for you, as a marketer? With the help of integrated marketing software, here are some examples of where you’d actually use the principle of “context” in your marketing.1) Dynamic Calls-to-ActionYou have a bunch of offers that you want to use to convert traffic into leads, leads into qualified leads, and qualified leads into customers. So it’d be kind of a bummer if you went to, say, a case study web page — typically an action performed when you’re further down the marketing funnel — and you saw a top-of-the-funnel CTA, like an educational tip sheet.However, not everyone who visits a case study page on your website is necessarily ready to talk to a salesperson. You don’t want to turn them away, either, by offering a CTA that’s too bottom-of-the-funnel. This could be perceived as a conversion nightmare, but with dynamic CTAs that adjust depending on who is visiting the page, you can actually surface a CTA that automatically aligns with the visitor’s stage in the sales cycle … or any other host of criteria you want to set! Think industry, business type, location, past activity/behaviors, that type of thing. Dynamic CTAs … pretty cool, eh?2) Dynamic Email Content and WorkflowsYour forms aren’t the only things that need to be smart as a whip. Your email database — especially if you want to maintain your space in people’s coveted inboxes — needs to be segmented into highly targeted lists. But you already knew that. Beyond killer segmentation, your email lists need to be smart enough to know when to pull in a contact, and certain information you have in your database about that contact, into your email marketing. Remember, a great context marketer delivers the right content, to the right person, at the right time. So to send emails that are contextually relevant, you need the power of workflows — the tool that will put the right person into the right list …… And the power of dynamic email content, which will make your email content personalized and relevant for each recipient!3) Smart FormsSo you want to be a context marketer. You want to be lovable. You want to see higher conversion rates. Let me introduce you to your new best friend … smart forms! They’re just what they sound like, forms for your landing pages that are wicked smart. So smart, in fact, that they know if someone has already filled out the form fields you’re asking for in the past. Because they know that, they don’t make your site visitors fill out the same form over and over again, and can help you glean more new information about your leads, instead of just more of the same stuff. We’ve started implementing this functionality ourselves, because we agreed that filling out the same form over and over again was a huge bummer! Smart Forms: Using context to be more lovable, improve conversion rates, and get you even more context about your visitors, leads, and customers!How are you leveraging context, not just content, in your marketing?Image credit: Thomas Hawk Originally published Dec 4, 2012 1:08:00 PM, updated August 27 2017 Topics: Marketing Strategy Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more