Kurtenbach: 10 things we learned about the Warriors this preseason

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.After a tumultuous offseason, that saw the exit of Kevin Durant to Brooklyn, pen meeting paper on new deals for Klay Thompson and Draymond Green, nine new players joining the roster, and the franchise’s move across the bay to San Francisco, it’s fair to say that the Warriors’ 2019 preseason was expected to be interesting.But this interesting?That, I’m not so sure about. Two wins and a never-ending string …last_img

The South Africa perception turnaround

first_img12 June 2009Five years have passed since that extraordinary moment in Zurich when Fifa president Sepp Blatter declared that South Africa had earned the right to host the biggest party on the planet.And with exactly one year remaining before the kick-off of the quadrennial showpiece of international soccer, South Africa can rightfully stake its claim as being the centre of the footballing universe.Of all the obstacles that have so far been overcome, the biggest has certainly been international perceptions of South Africa – and, indeed, the rest of the continent. Crime, an Aids pandemic, political instability and xenophobia provided plenty of ammunition for a hostile media and millions of Afro-pessimists around the world.And yet, like the miracle of 1994, South Africa has confronted its challenges head-on.Paul Bannister, acting CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa, says he believes the country has turned the corner “after 18 very challenging months, with concerns over Polokwane, the Eskom outages, Jacob Zuma’s legal issues and Zimbabwe”.Wadim Schreiner, managing director of international media research company Media Tenor, says foreign media coverage of South Africa has “completely turned around” since March.“The Germans just can’t believe that this World Cup is actually going to happen. They are now reporting that we are more or less on time, but there’s always a hint of disbelief.”The reality is that South Africa continues to meet its 2010 targets, and public perceptions of the country’s ability to host a successful tournament have now reached record highs.As France (1998), co-hosts Japan and South Korea (2002) and Germany (2006) all proved, the success of the host nation is critical to the success of a tournament of this magnitude.As a result, we can all be very grateful that Bafana Bafana, who have floundered for so long, are now showing signs of peaking at the rights time. Under Brazilians Carlos Parreira and his successor Joel Santana, the team has shown flashes of brilliance, and last weekend’s impressive victory against Poland was the perfect launch for South Africa’s Confederations Cup campaign.A year before the previous edition of the World Cup, Germany was seriously divided, but that tournament provided the glue that united the nation in a sea of black, yellow and red.South Africa too could be on the brink of a 2010-induced revolution that could change international perceptions of the country for decades to come.Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

SongKick Raises Nearly $2m More for Concert Alerts, Music History & More

first_imgThis latest round of funding puts SongKick’s fundraising total at just under $7.5 million.The service’s basic concert alerts feature is something that a number of other companies provide. BandsInTown.com is often discussed as a SongKick competitor and offers an API as well as a Facebook app. Looking at that site’s design, though, makes me wonder whether it’s been acquired by SongKick, whether there’s a lazy web designer jumping from music company to music company, or some other explanation for the two sites to look remarkably similar. Related Posts There are many different services that let you sign up to get an email alert when your favorite band is coming to town, but UK-born SongKick keeps innovating and keeps finding more support for its efforts. A 2007 graduate of tech incubator program YCombinator, SongKick has raised $1.8 million in its 4th round of funding, according to an SEC filing posted online tonight.SongKick lets users collaborate to create a shared memory of all the live music shows they’ve attended, complete with multimedia and set lists. The company has said it wants to build something like IMDB for the musical history of musicians. Beyond alerts, ticket sales and a historical resource, SongKick’s biggest ticket to success has probably been its Application Programming Interface, which allows other partner websites to automatically display upcoming concert dates on artist pages. The biggest partner? Music industry approved YouTube sister-site Vevo, which started using SongKick to power its concert listings this summer. Tags:#music#news#web 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… marshall kirkpatrick 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…last_img read more

Which Heating Fuel is Cheaper, Electricity or Natural Gas?

first_imgMost green builders want to choose an environmentally responsible heating fuel, which is why an increasing number of green homes are all-electric. To prevent catastrophic climate change, we need to make a rapid transition away from the burning of fossil fuels (including natural gas, propane, and oil) toward the use of renewable energy (for example, electricity generated by photovoltaic arrays or wind turbines).That said, many builders and homeowners have been using natural gas for heating for many years. Before they make the switch to electricity, they often ask an important question: Which heating fuel is cheaper, natural gas or electricity?In most U.S. states, the answer is natural gas — but there are exceptions. As with most energy-related questions, the accurate answer is, “It depends.”Natural gas is cheap in Alaska, where residential customers pay only $4.68 per 1,000 cubic feet. On the other hand, natural gas is expensive in Florida, where residential customers pay $16.77 per 1,000 cubic feet.Electricity is cheap in Louisiana and Washington, where residential customers pay only 9.7 cents per kWh. On the other hand, electricity is expensive in Connecticut, where residential customers pay 20.3 cents per kWh — more than twice as much as homeowners in Louisiana.When it comes to energy costs, Hawaii is an outlier. All forms of energy are expensive in Hawaii:  natural gas costs residential customers $25.83 per 1,000 cubic feet, while residential electricity costs 29.5 cents per kWh. Fortunately, most Hawaiian residents don’t have to worry about heating fuel costs.If you want to know which heating fuel is cheaper in your area, you have to do the math.Step one: Determine your local fuel prices. You can either look up these prices on your utility bills, call up your local utility, or use the statewide averages shown in the table below.Once you know your fuel… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

Gates, Dell, and Jobs: Reading Between The Lines Reveals Insights

first_imgThis Jobs – “phone” 2.  The most used word by each of the speakers was also fascinating:  The point the writer of the article was trying to make was that Jobs was much easier to understand by mere mortals.  I was personally surprised to see the variance in the number of words per sentence — I thought they would have been bunched closer together. Dell – 16.5 words per sentence Gates – “devices” — Brian Halligan. Originally published Feb 1, 2007 4:37:00 PM, updated March 21 2013  is a fascinating comparison of the words used by Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Michael Dell on recent keynote style speeches.  There are a bunch of interesting things that jumped out at me about this data: article Jobs – 10.5 words per sentence.  Dell – “gaming” 1.  The average number of words used per sentence was incredibly interesting.  3.  The word “cool” is one of the most common utterances out of all three of these middle aged tech industry leaders’ mouths.  I always thought as I got older that I should use the word “cool” less and less, but I guess the word “cool” has become a permanent part of our lexicon. If ten years ago someone told me that the most uttered word out of Bill Gates mouth was going to be “devices,” I would have laughed them out of the room.  Same goes for “phone” for Jobs and “gaming” for Dell.  It’s amazing how these companies have shifted their positioning over the years.  It will be interesting to see which ones pull off these shifts in positioning over the next couple of years. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Gates – 21.5 words per sentencelast_img read more

Finally! Google Updates PageRank: Here’s The Real Scoop From 139,000 Websites

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 25, 2007 11:54:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Google Updates If you’re involved in Internet Marketing, chances are, you have read the news about the recent updates Google has made to it’s Toolbar PageRank number (this is the publicly available PageRank number). Much of the current discussion has been the loss of PageRank by some high-profile sites in articles like “Digg Favorites Slapped by Google” and “Google changing the PageRank Algorithm?”  There has also been a fair amount of speculation as to the cause of this PageRank loss for these popular (and in many cases, highly regarded) websites.(For those of you who don’t know what Google PageRank is, check out The Importance of Google PageRank.)The most common speculation is that these sites lost PageRank because they were selling links, and that this is a “penalty” being imposed by Google rather than just a “normal” update of PageRank. I don’t have a strong opinion (yet) as to whether this was indeed the cause, but I do have some facts related to this recent news. As it turns out, we have access to the Google PageRank data for over 139,000 websites.  This data was collected via our free SEO tool called Website Grader.  Website Grader looks at a number of factors about a website as part of its evaluation — including Google PageRank.So, here are some of the insights drawn from this database. Disclaimer: The following was derived from some quick database queries and should be used for amusement purposes only. I’m not going to try and defend the points below. You don’t have to believe me.  Also, I’d suggest using some of the numbers shown as relative measures indicating trends — not absolute numbers you’d hang your hat on.What You Can Learn About PageRank From 139,000 Websites1) Contrary to what some believe, this recent update did not just reduce PageRank for some number of websites. There were sites that have increased in PageRank as a result of the recent update. A quick scan showed at least a handful of sites with PR5 or higher than rose to PR6 or higher. (As you would expect, there were also improvements in PageRank for a lot of lower ranked sites as well).2) Overall, the average PageRank (across all sites) seems to bounce around a little. If we ignore sites with PageRank 0, the average PageRank for the home page of websites submitted to Website Grader was around 4.59 in March 2007. This increased to about 4.77 in April 2007. Coincidentally, there was a Google PageRank update in that month. I always suspected that the April update was reasonably “liberal” in its allocation of PageRank, now the data seems to back it up. Note: Technically, PageRank is assigned to individual URLs (not websites). What we tracking is the PageRank of the home/default page of a website as that is what most people talk about as a measure of the overall weight of their website with search engines.3) Currently, the average PageRank is about 4.22 in October 2007  (it was 4.16 in September 2007). So, it would seem to me that there has been a drift downward in PageRank overall since the peak back in April.Dharmesh Shah contributed heavily to this article.  In fact, he might have even posted it himself if he were not locked in the basement writing code for HubSpot right now.  (To any law enforcement officials reading this, don’t worry, he is not being held captive against his will.  He has a big smile on his face and is working on “really cool stuff”.) Topics:last_img read more

Blog Posts Most Valuable B2B Marketing Content [Data]

first_img . efforts. More educational and instructional forms of content, like case studies (55%), white papers (43%) and webinars (42%), were also used. These types of educational and instructional content were rated the most valuable for directly supporting B2B marketers’ objectives, according to with the brand during the sales cycle through the use of multiple touchpoints, like The complexity of the B2B buying process, compared to that for B2C, often demands more of marketers. Because of the longer B2B sales cycle, marketers must diligently fill the sales pipeline and continuously support sales by . email or campaign nurturing programs MarketingProfs Marketers have an endless array of digital channels and choices for uncovering prospects, and and Content Marketing found 63% of B2B marketers in North America turn to content marketing as a key content marketingcenter_img lead generation Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack More specifically, North American B2B marketers used articles (78%) and e-newsletters (61%) for their Junta42 keeping prospects engaged source. Topics: Focus Research What types of content do you find to be effective in attracting prospects in the more research-oriented beginning stages of the buying process? Originally published Jul 15, 2011 2:44:00 PM, updated July 03 2013last_img read more

The Top 10 Qualities of High-Quality List Posts

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Originally published Mar 30, 2012 2:09:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Content Types In an online world where the quality of your blog content is only increasing in importance, the fabled ‘list’ post commonly gets a bad rap. It’s unfortunate, but definitely understandable. You can easily drown in a sea of particularly low-quality, low-value lists posts.But hey — not all list posts have to suck! While there are definitely some pretty awful ones out there, you can also find quite a few very valuable, high-quality list posts floating around the internet. So let’s not judge a list post by its title. I’m a firm believer that the list post does have a place in the world of high quality blog content. And to no surprise, this post about lists posts is largely a list post itself. You can be the judge of its quality, but I stand by my beliefs.First, let’s talk a little bit about common misconceptions about list posts. Then we’ll dive into the characteristics of high quality ones so you can start squashing the myth that all list posts are subpar … by writing awesome ones!Common Misconceptions About List PostsLast week, Daily Blog Tips published an article highlighting some common misconceptions about list posts and explaining why it’s silly to think about list posts in those ways. Let’s quickly review the points the article made:”List posts are just for lazy writers.” Pish posh! In fact, when done well (meaning it’s not just three, sentence-long points slapped together), a list post can take just as long — if not longer — than any other type of post for bloggers to write.”List posts aren’t right for my style/niche.” Huh? Why are list posts — a type of post — conceived as fitting only certain industries? A list post could work for any industry, as long as the subject matter and quality fit the audience. “List posts have to be really long.” Wrong, wrong, wrong. There’s no rule that your list post needs to be a laundry list of useless information or that it needs to include a minimum number of items. In fact, a super long, 100-point list runs the risk of sounding daunting to readers, deterring them from reading it and turning them away.The thing is, people love the classic list post! They tell the reader exactly what — and how much of it — they’re going to get out of the post, plus they’re very shareable. They’re also easy to scan, and with so much content available on the web these days, being able to scan a post and still grasp a helpful nugget or two of information is highly valuable. Here are a few examples of the types of list posts we’ve published recently on this very blog, all of which we believe are high quality posts that have performed well in terms of traffic, leads, and inbound links:”9 Ways to Increase Visibility for Your Best Blog Content””7 Keyword Research Mistakes That Stifle Your SEO Strategy””13 Brands Using LinkedIn Company Page Features the Right Way””5 Actionable Insights to Extract From Your Landing Page Analytics”Now for the meaty stuff. If you’re convinced that list posts can be a part of your blogging strategy, make sure the ones you publish include these top 10 qualities of high-quality list posts.1) Includes Items That Stay True to the List Subject/AngleSometimes a blogger will start writing a list about one thing, and then when he/she is done, it turns out to be a list that takes on a completely different angle because their research revealed more information about a slightly different subject. The problem is, this new angle is no longer relevant to their audience. Don’t let this happen to you. If, after your initial research, you find that the points you’ve brainstormed don’t fit with the subject you intended, scrap it and move on.Another common symptom of bad list posts are list items that don’t quite fit with the others. For example, if you notice in this very list post, all of the items on this list are qualities of awesome list post. If one of my points was, in itself, an example of a list post, that wouldn’t make sense, right?  Be consistent and parallel. If you’re writing a list of examples, they should all be examples. If you’re writing a list of best practices, they should all be best practices. It’s easy to stray off-topic when you’re trying to compile a hearty list, but you need to avoid it. Otherwise your list — and your writing — loses its integrity.2) Dense With Valuable Takeaways (No Fluff!)The biggest indicator of a lousy list post is one that contains a ton of fluff and no real, valuable takeaways for the reader. Here’s an example of what we mean:3 Ways to Improve Your Social Media MarketingBe unique! Do something to stand out from your competitors.Take risks! Try out-of-the-box ideas.Measure results! Use your analytics to tell you what’s working.What a fantastic list post! I’ve learned — absolutely nothing. No wonder list posts have a terrible reputation. That took me 60 seconds to write. Sure, on the surface, each of these list points sound valuable. You absolutely should do all these things in your social media marketing. But it doesn’t tell you exactly how to do those things. Your list shouldn’t just give readers a list of things to do and expect them to figure out how to do those things themselves. It should also walk them through the steps required to actually do those things.A great list post nixes the fluff and concretely explains each item in detail. And while every point you make on your list might not be new to all your readers, if a reader walks away thinking, “Well, I already put numbers 3, 4, and 6, into practice, but I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on numbers 1, 2, and 5!” — then you’ve probably got yourself a high-quality list!3) Links to More In-Depth Information When NecessaryOne of the ways you can make sure you’re hitting on point #2 is to direct readers to other resources when necessary. Great list posts are comprehensive. It also means they can get pretty long and unwieldy, especially if you’re truly committed to point #2. That’s why sometimes it’s okay if you have to point your readers to another place for more in-depth information. For example, we recently wrote a list post entitled, “9 Ways to Make Your Marketing Analytics Actionable.” Number 8 on the list reads “Score & Prioritize Your Leads for Sales,” which could be a blog post in itself — and hey … it is! Giving our readers enough information for that section to be truly helpful would have involved copying and pasting the entirety of that post into our list post, and that wouldn’t exactly have been the most helpful choice. So what we did was explain the point in a moderate amount of detail, and then directed readers to the other post where they could find more in-depth information. Don’t be afraid to do this in your own list posts. And if you have to link to an external resource because you haven’t the written the post yourself — great! You’ve just passed off some link love, and you also now have another article idea for your blogging backlog!  4) Explains List Items Using Relatable ExamplesPiggybacking again on point #2, sometimes one of the best ways to adequately explain a point on your list is to use an example to support it. Real examples are ideal, but sometimes even a hypothetical works just as great. In fact, we’ve used each of these example types in the first 3 items on this list! The main thing to consider when selecting or concocting an example is to keep it as relatable to your readers as possible. If the audience of your blog is comprised of a variety of readers representing different industries or businesses (like ours), this can be tricky. The key here is to keep your examples general so that everyone can relate. Here comes a hypothetical example to explain what I mean about using hypothetical examples …In our list post, “7 Keyword Research Mistakes That Stifle Your SEO Strategy,” for example, we use the broad, hypothetical (even mythical!) example of unicorn farms/breeders to more easily explain points 4 and 5 on our list so that everyone could relate.5) Numbered Items This is an easy one. If you’re writing a list-style post — and especially when you use a number in the title of your list post — number your list items! This is particularly important when you have a longer list, because readers like to be able to gauge their progress as they’re reading through the list (i.e. “only halfway to go” or “I’m almost done!”). Readers may also like to reference certain points on a list later or share them with others, and being able to refer to a specific number rather than having to count themselves and say “it’s the 16th item on the list” is a much more user-friendly experience for your blog audience. Don’t make things difficult for your readers.6) Includes an Appropriate Number of List ItemsWhile we’re talking about numbers, let’s clear some misconceptions about them. Some list bloggers are of the camp that you should choose a number before you start writing your list and make sure you have enough points to fit that exact number. We are not. Sitting down and saying you’re going to write a list consisting of 14 items makes no sense. What if there really ends up being only 11 truly solid, valuable items that make up that list? Does that mean you should come up with 3 more forced or somewhat repetitive items just to achieve your goal of 14? We think not.The rule of thumb is: just be comprehensive. This very list post includes 10 items because that’s how many I thought were individually valuable and indicative of a high-quality list post for this particular subject. Originally I had brainstormed 11, but as I started writing, I cut one out because it wasn’t that different from another point, and they could easily be represented as one.As we mentioned before, list posts can easily become unwieldy. When you sit down to start drafting your list post, decide how granular you want to make your topic. This will help make your list more manageable. The title you craft can also help you stay focused. For example, if you’re a plumber writing a list post about the various ways you can unclog a drain, you might decide to stick to “The Top 4 Ways to Unclog a Drain,” rather than writing a lengthy list post covering “The 50 Different Ways to Unclog a Drain.”Furthermore, do some testing and research if you want to glean some best practices for your list posts. An internal study of our own blog, for example, revealed that posts for which the title indicated 6 items or fewer didn’t perform as well as when the title indicated the list contained 7 or more items. The lesson? While we sometimes still write lists posts containing 6 or fewer items, we don’t include the number in the title for those posts. For example, our post, “Why Every Marketer Needs Closed-Loop Reporting” is essentially a list post, but it’s not framed that way in the title since it only includes 6 points. Do your own analysis to determine best practices for your business blog.7) Uses Category Buckets (For Longer Lists)Now, if you had decided to write that list post of 50 different ways to unclog a drain, your list post would look pretty daunting, considering the sheer number of items it would include. In this case, a great practice is to use subheaders to break up your list into categories. This makes the list much more scanable (remember how people love to scan blogs?), and a lot less overwhelming at first glance.For example, when we published “25 Eye-Popping Internet Marketing Statistics for 2012,” we broke up the statistics into 5 sections: “The Internet in 2012,” “Mobile in 2012,” “Social Media in 2012,” “Video in 2012,” and “Ecommerce in 2012.” If some of our readers didn’t give a squat about ecommerce, they could easily scan the post and avoid that section. Perfect!8) Contains Logically Ordered List ItemsYour list, like any other post you’d write, should flow and tell a story. How you do this will definitely depend on the subject and contents of your list, but here are some great organizational structures to choose from: alphabetical (great for glossaries), chronological (great for step-by-step guides), by popularity/importance — most to least or least to most (great for top 10/20/50 lists). Another best practice is to emphasize your strongest points in the beginning, middle, and end of your list to keep readers engaged throughout.When I sat down and brainstormed this list, for example, it was just that — a brainstormed list. It was unorganized and all over the place. But once I’d identified all the points I wanted to include, I rearranged the furniture a bit. I realized how easily numbers 5 and 6 would flow into each other, and how number 5 would make sense after discussing points 2, 3 and 4. Number 1 was a great starting point, and number 10 made the most sense last, since that’s likely the last thing you’d tweak when writing a list post. Sometimes your list points will practically arrange themselves (e.g. “5 Steps to Do X”), and sometimes there won’t be as obvious a story (e.g. “20 Ways to Do Y”). Just put the time into figuring it out and ordering your items as logically as possible.9) Parallel FormattingI’m not as strict about this one as some list post purists, but in general, I agree that your list post should have a consistent and parallel look. Failing to do so only confuses readers, especially when they can’t tell that they’ve moved onto a new item on the list because the header style was inconsistent or under-emphasized.  Here are some helpful guidelines to consider:Try to keep sections similar in length.  Use the same header style to highlight your individual list items, and make sure it stands out.Make sure your list item headers are written in parallel fashion (i.e. if it’s a list of action items, each should be led with a verb)Use images and bullet points to break up text when appropriate.10) Clear and Catchy TitleAs we mentioned in the beginning of this post, one of the reasons people have always loved list posts is because they know exactly what — and how much — they’ll get out of them. There is no guesswork involved, and expectations you’ve set for your readers are very clear. Make sure your title epitomizes that. An effective list post title should accomplish two things in order to entice readers to actually read the post: 1) capture the readers’ attention and 2) clearly indicate the value or what the reader will learn, and 3) indicate how much they will learn with a number.For example, earlier this week, we published “The 7 Aspects of Inbound Marketing Most People Screw Up.” Do you have to wonder what this post will be about? No! You know that after reading this post, you’ll know which 7 parts of inbound marketing people tend to screw up so you can avoid screwing them up, too. And chances are, you probably don’t like to fail, right? So you’re probably kind of intrigued to learn if you’re one of “most people” and, if so, what you should stop screwing up.What’s your take on list posts? What else would you add to our list of high-quality list post qualities? ;-)Image Credit: MStewartPhotographylast_img read more

Smartphone Traffic to Ecommerce Sites Up 103% Since 2011 [INFOGRAPHIC]

first_img Originally published Aug 23, 2012 4:30:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: How important is mobile optimization to your ecommerce website? If going mobile isn’t already one of your priorities this year, you might want to clear some space in your strategy for it. The following infographic, brought to us by the folks over at digital marketing technology company Monetate, highlights the impressive growth in traffic (103%!) from smartphones to leading ecommerce websites over the past year.The infographic also calls attention to the battle for smartphone supremacy between Android and iPhone devices, both of which represent the most growth in smartphone-driven traffic to ecommerce sites. Furthermore, the graphic analyzes the various shopping activities of smartphone users as well as the mobile marketing tactics currently being used by marketers, with website mobile optimization topping the list at 46%, followed closely by mobile apps (45%), and trailed by mobile email optimization at 35%. Check it out!(Click infographic to enlarge.)How are you leveraging mobile marketing for your ecommerce business? Have you noticed an increase in traffic from smartphones in the last year? E-Commerce Websites Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

5 Ways to Extend the Lifespan of a Tweet

first_img Originally published Nov 25, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Twitter Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: What’s the difference between a healthy tweet and a sick tweet? Simply put: Healthy tweets live longer. How long, you ask? Well, the jury’s still out on that. Some reports say 48 hours, while others say 18 minutes. Either way, we marketers are always striving for those healthy tweets — ones that reach out to our followers and get them engaged with our brand.But with 9,100 tweets scrolling by every second, we have to do everything we can to get our tweets noticed. There’s a lot of outside factors that influence the lifespan of a tweet — numbers of followers, time of day you’re tweeting, etc. — but to make sure your tweets are as impactful as possible, you have to have a game plan.So, here are five strategies you can employ on Twitter to give your tweets the best chance to be healthy and get noticed by your followers. 1) Optimize your tweets for retweets.One of the best things about marketing on Twitter is that it gives you a built-in mechanism for extending the lifespan of your tweet: the retweet.When someone retweets your tweet, it means they found the content valuable enough to share with their own followers, thus extending the lifetime of your tweet. It’s a great way to pass along content to your followers that you didn’t create yourself or to show support to a fellow business or colleague.Get started by: Checking out the free tool RetweetLab.com. Powered by HubSpot, the tool allows you to analyze any Twitter account to get the data you need to make sure your tweets are retweetable. The tool was created by Dan Zarrella, who wrote The Science of Retweets and has spent years analyzing data to bring us best practices for social media marketing. (One quick tip: Always cap your tweets at around 115 characters for optimal retweet-ability.)2) Schedule your tweets in advance.Twitter is a great platform for on-the-fly updates, but when you’re using Twitter as part of your overall social media strategy, you’ll want to schedule tweets in advance that complement other aspects of your marketing. This will help keep your tweets healthy because you’ll have time to optimize them.That’s not to say you can’t post Twitter updates while at a big conference or event. But what if you’re the sole social media marketer for your company and you’re at the event? It’s good to have a few tweets cued up for backup that still support your other marketing efforts.Get started by: Setting aside 10 minutes a week to schedule tweets in advance. Friday might even be the best day to do this, so you know when you get in to work on Monday, you have your social media content all planned out for the week. This leaves you room to practice newsjacking for anything that’s relevant to your industry or capitalize on a marketing campaign that’s doing really well by adding in a few extra tweets mid-week.(HubSpot customers: We just made a fantastic planning spreadsheet so you can bulk upload tweets with ease.)3) Include a link in all of your organic tweets.Unless you’ve got a Twitter update that shakes the entire world, adding a link to your tweets is great way to keep it healthy. It brings even more content to your tweet while staying within the confines of Twitter’s character limits. It also gives people something valuable to pass on to their followers beyond your commentary on the link. Providing valuable information to your followers is the best way to get noticed.Get started by: Taking a link and coming up with multiple ways to promote it. We recently posted this article and suggest promoting one link in five different ways by using the title of the page, a quote, one takeaway you discovered, one statistic, and a sentence of commentary. Not a bad exercise to do, especially when tweets with links are 86% more likely to be retweeted.4) Get more Twitter followers.There’s no magic number when it comes to Twitter followers. But the more followers you have, the more likely it is that someone will see your update and engage with you. For example, if Justin Bieber were to retweet you, it’s possible your tweets would be seen by millions (maybe even tens of millions). But unless you’re a megastar, you’ll have to settle for getting followers the old-fashioned way.Get started by: Engaging with others in your industry on Twitter. You can search Twitter for relevant hashtags, or industry terms, to help you find other people or companies that are like you. You can even create lists of these folks so you can easily monitor their Twitter updates and see who else they’re engaging with. Connect with them by retweeting them or asking them questions about content they’ve shared. But don’t resort to getting new followers by tricks or bots — that’s just not proper social media etiquette.5) Use a hashtag in your tweets.Hashtags are commonly used in tweets to give those scanning through some quick context about the subject of the update. You may not say the word “social media” in your update, but adding #socialmedia to your tweet will catch the eyes of those interested in the subject. Also, hashtags are a great way to search for tweets – so your tweets should be optimized for search as well.Get started by: Having a handy list of 7-10 hashtags that you can always use in your tweets. Setting up the list early takes the guesswork out when your tweeting on the go or scheduling tweets for the week. You should use these hashtags when sharing your own organic content and especially when you’re curating content to make it easy for your followers to understand the relevance of your retweet.Along with these five strategies to keep your tweet healthy, don’t forget to make sure you’ve put some thought into the copy, too. Crafting your update to include an attention-grabbing title, or colorful commentary, will go a long way in making sure your tweets get noticed by your followers. Be interesting, be authentic, and most importantly, keep the “social” in social media by being human.What other strategies do you have for making sure your tweets last as long as possible? Let us know in the comments!last_img read more