Tuesday August 20th Local Sports

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — José Abreu hit a towering three-run homer in Chicago’s four-run second inning, helping Iván Nova and the White Sox beat the Minnesota Twins 6-4. Nova allowed 10 hits and two runs in 5 1/3 innings. Abreu connected for his 27th homer, driving a Kyle Gibson offering deep to the second deck above the bullpens in left-center field.Minnesota returned home after a 5-1 road trip helped re-establish its control of the AL Central. But the loss to Chicago trimmed the Twins’ advantage in the division to two games over idle Cleveland.Nova (9-9) allowed 10 hits and two runs in 5 1/3 innings, with both runs scoring among Minnesota’s first three batters of the game.Nova improved to 5-0 with a 0.85 ERA in his last six starts. Alex Colomé worked a rocky ninth for his 24th save in 25 chances.Jorge Polanco hit his 18th homer for Minnesota, which leads the league with 241 homers and has an extra-base hit in 79 straight games, the fourth-longest streak in team history.Kyle Gibson (11-6) surrendered five runs in 6 2/3 innings to take the loss. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Twins slugger Nelson Cruz has been reinstated from the injured list after the minimum 10-day stay and will play through a ruptured tendon in his left wrist. Cruz ruptured the tendon on Aug. 8, and the Twins feared he would miss significant time. But the team later learned he could play with the injury, and he has told the team he is pain-free. The 39-year-old Cruz is hitting .294 with 32 homers and 76 RBIs. IOWA CITY — Iowa and Iowa State are both in the pre-season Associated Press college football poll released on Monday. Iowa is among seven Big Ten teams in the rankings, as the Hawkeyes are #20. The other Big Ten teams are Ohio State at #5, Michigan at #7, Penn State at #15, Michigan State at #18, Wisconsin at #19, and Nebraska at #24. Iowa State is right behind Iowa in the #21 position in the pre-season rankings. Two other Big 12 teams appear in the pre-season poll with Oklahoma #4 and Texas #10. Clemson is the top team in the pre-season rankings, with Alabama second and Georgia third. Find the full poll here. MASON CITY — Mason City High’s new football coach is settling in to his new job as the season is about to get underway. Brandon Krusey says he’s very excited to get things started.Krusey says part of the learning process for the Mohawk squad has been dealing with the language of his system.Krusey says he’s happy with the number of athletes coming out for football in the sophomore, junior and senior classes.Krusey came to Mason City from Davenport North. He has a career head coaching record of 84-70 with previous stops at North Tama, Grundy Center and Independence. Mason City will scrimmage Forest City as part of the Mohawk Fall Athletics Kickoff event this Friday night at 7 o’clock at Mohawk Field. AMES — Iowa State’s tight end position has developed into a major weapon and has given the Cyclones a more diverse offense. Junior Chase Allen and sophomore Charlie Kolar provide the Cyclones an opportunity to put multiple tight ends on the field.Allen hopes to remain injury free this season. After earning second team All Big 12 honors in 2017 Allen missed five games due to injury last season after a fast start.The Cyclones are 21st in the preseason Associated Press poll. It is their first appearance in the preseason survey in 41 years.Iowa State opens the season August 31st hosting UNI.last_img read more

Community Garden Plans On Hold

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – Borough residents who were hoping to plant their tomato plants and geraniums in a community garden will have to wait until next year, possibly, as plans for a garden on borough-owned property are on hold.Cindy Burnham, who has been leading the charge for establishing a community garden, said plans to establish a garden on a parcel the municipality owns on Marion Street have fallen through.Proponents would work to establish one for spring 2013, she said.Marion Street was not the location some gardeners had been seeking, insisting the borough council allow them to use 94 West Front St., a 2,400 square-foot plot, next to the borough’s public library and overlooking the Navesink River.But borough council members said the Marion Street site was the most viable location of any owned by the town. Council members have opposed using the property next to the library, saying that given the limited amount of green, open recreational space in the borough, that site should remain available for more than the handful who would have access to a community garden.Supporters have been arguing the location is the most ideal of the borough-owned sites because of its accessibility and size. They also have contended that officials have not offered any adequate reason why the site can’t be used for a garden and have questioned whether officials have other plans for the property, possibly selling it off. Mayor Pasquale Menna in the past had denied that assertion.Burnham acknowledged there wouldn’t be a garden, “not this summer,” because two potential financial benefactors have dropped their support. “They realized this is not the appropriate site for a first community garden,” she said, referring to the approximately 129 foot by 40 foot Marion Street location, a former water utility pumping station, on the borough’s eastern border with Fair Haven.Several thousand dollars would be needed to remove and dispose of the site’s existing asphalt sections and install water to get the site ready for planting. The benefactors, who Burnham declined to identify, have said, “They don’t even want to be involved with Marion Street,” Burnham said.Borough Councilwoman Kathy Horgan, who is the council’s liaison to the environmental commission, said last week it was up to Burnham to let the council know about the plans for the Marion Street site. “She hasn’t presented us with anything,” Horgan said.When informed about Burnham’s take on the issue, especially the money needed to get the garden up and running, Horgan said, “But you know these are things that could have been done nearly a year ago.”The debate over a community garden had gotten remarkably contentious and heated over the last two years as Burnham and others locked horns with the governing body over its potential location.Borough officials continued to oppose as inappropriate the West Front Street location, along with plots at Maple Cove’s natural area overlooking the river at the northern tip of Maple Avenue and a spot in Marine Park, a municipally owned and maintained public park. Propon­ents of the garden had suggested the three sites proposed as the best choices.Council members, Horgan said, insisted they support the garden but in a space that would be accessible and available in a borough that is almost entirely built out.“The organizing people in a community garden wanted it in a certain space and they weren’t happy with it any place else,” Horgan said.Burnham, who lives in Fair Haven but owns a rental property in Red Bank, has regularly challenged the governing body on a variety of issues over the last few years.The garden supporters will look for available funding to work on next year’s plan, she said.last_img read more

Frank Talk About Opioid Abuse Among Youth

first_imgHer son, as a teen, started smoking marijuana, which motivated Regan to take him out of public school and enroll him in a private Catholic high school, hoping to get him away from a bad element. In high school, however, her son soon graduated to abusing prescription pain medications. And even though he eventually won a full scholarship to college, he continued his downward slide into addiction, stealing jewelry and other things from family members to pay for his habit. That resulted in numerous rehab stays and admissions to various treatment programs – all failing to change her son’s behavior, Regan said. Ultimately, her son almost died in a rundown Los Angeles motel, with a needle dangling in his arm. “Addiction follows you wherever you go. It destroys you,” she said.Looking back, she has come to realize “love is blind,” and you may not see the symptoms right in front of you. She recommended looking through your child’s clothes. If you find things like small pieces of aluminum foil, little plastic bags, or hollowed-out ballpoint pens (used to snort drugs), these are telltale signs, as are weight loss, a loss of interest in things that had been a passion, and sullenness.“If you’re not aware of the signs, it can happen to you,” she warned.Her son, Daniel, who is now 26, eventually turned his life around through a program he completed in California – a program covered by the family’s “platinum” health insurance plan, which would now cost $135,000 a month, Regan said. He has been clean and sober for six-and-a-half years, she said.She has started a program, Coming Full Circle: Loud N Clear Foundation, working with families on prevention, intervention and recovery. She has worked with 7,500 families through CFC Loud N Clear. “My mission was always to help parents to avoid the pitfalls I fell in,” she said. And that involved some tough love: drug testing your children if you suspect illegal use. And maybe more importantly, talking with your children, she recommended. “The best place to have a conversation with your kids,” she advised, “is in the car. They’re trapped.”Lagrotteria is a 10-year veteran with the department, grew up in Rumson and serves as the department’s juvenile officer. He established the program with fellow Patrolman Dwayne Reevey and hopes to encourage residents to help pass along the information. Lagrotteria said he would be willing to offer the presentation for schools or community groups. By John Burton |FAIR HAVEN – Put aside those notions of the Rumson-Fair Haven “bubble,” says Fair Haven Police Patrolman William Lagrotteria.The truth of the matter is opioid and other substance abuse does happen here on the peninsula. “It affects us as well,” he said.Lagrotteria took this lesson and other information to residents in a program he presented at Knollwood School, 224 Hance Road, last Thursday evening (July 27).Before an audience of approximately 15 in the borough’s middle school, Lagrotteria laid out what statistics indicate and what his professional experience with the department has shown him of how this epidemic is infecting this affluent suburban area.In his professional experience, “It’s coming from kids going into medicine cabinets,” getting ahold of prescription pain medications they and family members have received from doctors, using them for what they thought would be recreational use and getting hooked, he said, “leading down that rabbit hole to heroin addiction.”The three major drug groups youths would likely abuse, Lagrotteria explained, are depressants, stimulants (which would include anxiety, seizure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications) and barbiturates.The easy availability of these drugs has led to “rainbow parties,” which are, Lagrotteria told the gathering, parties kids have where pills of every variety and color are thrown in bowl and taken indiscriminately by the party-goers. He personally knows of police breaking up two such parties in Rumson in the last year.ADHD drugs like Adderall and Ritalin, already widely prescribed for adolescents, are being sold to other youths. For those who don’t have the medical condition, these drugs give users heightened focus and attention, and are used by some to concentrate on grades and college applications. “They’re showing the same effect as someone who is taking crystal meth or cocaine,” Lagrotteria said. These drugs, he added, are now used by some girls as appetite suppressants, as a substitute for forced vomiting and other tactics for eating disorders.Kids are selling the drugs for upwards of $20 per pill. “It’s incredible the amount being passed off in the high school,” he said.Lynn Regan, who now runs a substance abuse recovery program, relates her experiences deal-ing with her son’s addiction and working with other families facing similar situations.Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School in Rumson is a sports-oriented school, said Lagrotteria, who coaches varsity football there. He pointed out that many students play multiple team sports during the year. “They’re so active,” he said of the kids, “they’re eventually getting injured,” which can lead to pain medication prescriptions.“I can’t begin to tell you how powerful these drugs are,” he said, pointing to the commonly prescribed Percocet or Oxycodone, which he said some kids will snort as well as swallow. Three out of four of those with heroin addiction admit to starting by using a pain medication, Lagrotteria noted. And when it comes to heroin, “Guess what?” Lagrotteria asked, “It’s very easy to get.”Lagrotteria was not alone in voicing the stark realities. He was joined by Lynn Regan, originally from the borough who now lives in Howell and runs an addiction recovery program, adapting hard-learned lessons to treat her clients.Regan knows the suffering of addiction or having a loved one go through it.“Unfortunately, we all know someone who went through this,” she said, telling the experiences she had with her son, Daniel. “You don’t want to be part of this club,” she said. This article was first published in the August 3 – 10, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Too much LVR as Bombers retain Kootenay High School Soccer Crown

first_imgJesemyn Vandonselasr, Emma Wheeldon and Riley Zondervan each added a pair of goals while Emily Taylor and Matteah Lorenzo each scored singles.Against the Prince Charles, it was the Laurel Halleran, Wheeldon and Maya Ida each scoring three times to lead the Bombers.Michalchuk added a pair while Jesemyn Vandonselasr netted a single.Keeper Hannah Quinn was in goal for both games, surrendering a pair of goals.LVR enters the 16-team provincial tournament next month as the defending champion, having won the title in 2016 in Campbell River with a 2-1 shootout victory over St. Thomas Moore of Vancouver.J. Lloyd Crowe, posting a come-from-behind 4-3 win over David Thompson of Invermere, is the second Kootenay team entered in the provincial tournament. The Hawks scored twice on penalty kicks in the final 10 minutes of the game to steal the win.The Bombers opened the season winning the Immaculata Tournament in Kelowna. LVR then finished with a 2-3 record at the high-calibre University of Victoria High School Girl’s Soccer Tournament in Victoria.The Bombers posted wins over Glenlyon Norfork and Royal Bay, both Victoria teams.Laurel Halleran was named LVR Tournament MVP. The L.V. Rogers Bombers left no doubt in anyone’s mind who the better team is in the Kootenays.The Bombers rang up 25 goals in two games en route to capturing the Kootenay High School AA Girls’ Soccer Championship Saturday in Creston.LVR claimed the title with a 12-1 romp over J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks of Trail.The Bombers earlier blasted Prince Charles of Creston 13-1 in the tournament semifinal.LVR now advances to the BC High School Girls’ Soccer Championship June 1-3 in Nelson.Shianne Michalchuk led the Bomber offensive attack against the Hawks, scoring four times in the contest as LVR took control of the contest early and never looked back.last_img read more