10 months agoSolskjaer reveals Rashford pep-talk month before taking Man Utd job

first_imgSolskjaer reveals Rashford pep-talk month before taking Man Utd jobby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has revealed he had a chat with Marcus Rashford a month before taking the job.Solskjaer has won his opening three games with Rashford starting in all of them scoring twice.Speaking to Stadium Astro, Solskjaer revealed he spoke to Rashford after United’s 1-0 Champions League win against Young Boys.He said: “I went to see the Young Boys game just a month ago and I met him and Jesse [Lingard] in the corridor just as I was leaving the game.”He had a few chances in that game and [I said] ‘don’t worry son, just relax a little bit.'”Solskjaer continued: “Yes, of course you’re excited by working with all this talent but then going into detail is what I can do best.“That was my ‘X factor’, scoring goals. So if I can help and guide him a little bit then great.”It’s all in the head. You know what to do, that’s key in everything and then be able to do it.”So videos of good finishes, bad finishes, discuss things and then go out and practice and be as good as you can possibly get. There’s always time for another practice session.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

22 days agoArsenal boss Emery: Martinelli’s long-term position?

first_imgArsenal boss Emery: Martinelli’s long-term position?by Paul Vegas22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveGabriel Martinelli is set for more action with Arsenal tonight.Martinelli finds himself in line to feature for Arsenal tonight, when they host Standard Liege in the Europa League.Gunners head coach Unai Emery said: “He is with us because he deserves to be with us. Pre-season was his chance to show and to work with us and we are very, very happy with him. He is a very fast player and that is a quality that is very important. “He gives us good pressing ­without the ball, good pace in the final third, chances to score and he’s getting better. He is young but if his ­performances are getting better every day, it is good for him to carry on being with us.”On Martinelli’s long-term position, he added: “We used him in training and against Nottingham Forest as a striker.“It is not the best position for him but he played well and he played there sometimes in Brazil but he can play right or left.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Listen: Texas WR Daje Johnson Released A Rap Single, ‘Dealer’, About Dealing Drugs

first_imgA closeup of a Texas Longhorns cheerleader.AUSTIN, TX – OCTOBER 27: A cheerleader of the Texas Longhorns show Hook’em Horns during the game against the Nebraska Cornhuskers at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium October 27, 2007 in Austin, Texas. Texas won 28-25. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)Texas wide receiver Daje Johnson recently released a rap single titled, “Dealer,” and, well, it’s focused on a topic you don’t want a student-athlete to be rapping about. The single, appropriately titled, is about dealing drugs. The track opens, “If you lookin’ for the dealer, I got the plug. Probly catch him with the reefer.” Here’s the full song. It contains lyrics that are not safe for work. Johnson has had somewhat of a troubled career with the Longhorns, catching just five passes for -7 yards in 2014. Reaction to the single getting released was expectedly critical. The 5-foot-10, 184-pound senior later apologized for the song. I apologize for my prior post Dealer. I assure you that I’m still focused on my goals this season…… I just make music for fun— Daje’ Johnson (@BL4CKM4KO) July 8, 2015Texas opens its 2015 season Sept. 5 against Notre Dame. [Burnt Orange Nation]last_img read more

Chiefs slam Harper on murdered Indigenous women support growing for direct action

first_imgBy Kenneth JacksonAPTN National NewsTwo of the chiefs that stormed Parliament Hill a year ago say the actions of the prime minister indicate he couldn’t care less about murdered Indigenous women and have thrown their support behind direct action to force a national inquiry on the issue.Chiefs Patrick Madahbee and Isadore Day fielded questions from APTN National News based on the recent ultimatum by Tyendinaga Mohawk activist Shawn Brant.Brant is giving Prime Minister Stephen Harper until the end of the month to call an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women or face unspecified direct action.“Shawn has demonstrated that he backs up his words,” said Madahbee, grand council chief of Anishinabek Nation in northern Ontario. “I support anything that is done with the intent of protecting our rights.”Brant is a well-known Mohawk activist and led a blockade of Hwy. 401 in 2007 for 11 hours. At the same time he blocked the railway tracks and local road choking the route.The Harper government has refused to call an inquiry and the Prime Minister’s Office didn’t respond to questions sent by email.Madabhee said direct action is typically the only way to get the government’s attention and tactics like passing out leaflets or getting signatures for a petition don’t work.“The government has become used to that tactic. It doesn’t move them,” he said.Madahbee said Harper has no sympathy for the growing number of missing and murdered that ranges between 600 to 3,000 according to various studies.“This prime minister just doesn’t care,” he said.Madahbee was there with Chief Isadore Day of Serpent River First Nation, in northwest Ontario, when they stormed Parliament Hill Dec. 4, 2012 and tried to get into the House of Commons to confront Harper. It was arguably the beginning of the Idle No More movement as the cross-country protest escalated from that day forward.Day says he backs direct action for a national inquiry, however his answer was a little more complex.“I support direct action but think if it’s going to have an impact we must include others in that march,” he said. “Direct action must be done with the inclusion of others relevant to process.”So far Brant has refused to say exactly what he has planned but has told APTN it will be more than a blockade of a highway or railway tracks.“The notion of having all the details of a campaign is very natural. We are asking for unconditional support for a cause that needs to be concluded by whatever means necessary,” said Brant, whose Mohawk community sits near Belleville, Ont. “I understand it takes tremendous courage to trust our judgment.”Brant’s 2007 highway and railway blockades cost the Canadian economy about $100 million, according to the Canadian Security and Intelligence ServiceBrant and the “Mohawk men of Tyendinaga” have been given a mandate by the community protect Indigenous women and the first step he said is national inquiry.“We are only asking our leadership to look into their hearts and decide for themselves if tactical uncertainty is worse than the on-going slaughter of our mothers and daughters. Doing nothing is no longer an option,” he said.Day agrees doing nothing is no longer an option and said the murder and abductions of Indigenous women is an issue to draw a line on.“My opinion is we should leave the political soapbox far away from this issue and do all we can in our communities for our women and girls and contribute to a collective push to hold the federal government accountable for every loss of life of our Indigenous women,” he said. “Our First Nation women are being marginalized in a national policy by the Conservative government that is not only disgraceful (but) refusing a national inquiry is a national embarrassment to all Canadians.”Gladys Radek and Gail Nepinak have both lost family members. In Radek’s case her niece went missing in 2005 and has not been heard from since, while Nepinak lost her sister to serial Killer Shawn Lamb and her body is supposedly buried in a Winnipeg dump underneath trash.The Native Women’s Association of Canada issued another call for an inquiry last week presenting the names of over 23,000 people who want one too at a media conference in Ottawa.President Michele Audette remained neutral on the call for direct action but said she appreciated Brant’s support.At the same media conference last week, Algonquin elder Annie Smith St. George said everyone should come together in a peaceful way.“We should a never stop speaking about it, we should take it and work together, it’s time to come together in a peaceful way,” said Smith St. George. “If we can do a peaceful dialogue and not going against each other, because you know, you get hurt.”kjackson@aptn.calast_img read more

APTN opens the books on Peters reserve finds questionable payments INACs role

first_imgKenneth JacksonAPTN National NewsPeters First Nation’s three-member band council were allocated hundreds of thousands of dollars over a two-year period to operate a band with 12 homes on 131 hectares and little infrastructure.The money was much more than what band council claimed to Indigenous Affairs from 2013 to 2015 according to the First Nations Transparency Act.But the money just didn’t go to council.It was also allocated to members who are known to vote for council every two years. A close look at the finances over those years indicate that over 90 per cent of all expenditures to band members went to those who voted for council.This happened while the British Columbia reserve was in a bitter membership battle that continues to this day on a nation that receives around $300,000 in annual funding from Indigenous Affairs.But it doesn’t end there.Documents show questionable payments not only to the children of council but one of their mothers received tens of thousands in social assistance and allegedly didn’t qualify, while one councillor had over 10 jobs, an APTN National News investigation has uncovered.A recent audit uncovered that the band kept little paper trail of supporting documents for social assistance, and council members were signing cheques over to themselves, all of which the auditor said opened the band to the potential for “inappropriate payments” during the fiscal year of 2014/2015.Indigenous Affairs (INAC) approved the audit without question.More so, Indigenous Affairs funded the National Child Benefit program that year without any supporting documents, asking the band to submit details of how the money would be spent later.That was just one of the many programs led by Victoria Peters, a longtime councillor who is also – to name a few – the band manager, bookkeeper, income assistance administrator, community health representative, on the membership committee, accounts payable/receivable and social worker.Chief Norma Webb has refused to comment directly on any part of APTN’s investigation supported by confidential ledgers, audits, band council resolutions, internal emails, INAC documents and interviews with band members spanning more than three months.APTN has also been following two court cases involving Peters band council where band members are suing the council for breaching its fiduciary duty by allegedly misusing band money, not keeping records and appointing themselves to all the jobs.Peters First Nation along the Fraser River about 130 km east of Vancouver. Submitted.The band council, at the same time, is trying to enforce an injunction to have “confidential” documents returned to the office, alleging former employee Frances Genaille and her son, Andrew stole them and, in part, are using the documents against council to seek INAC to investigate the band council.“Andrew has disclosed confidential information regarding the Peters social assistance program that could only have been obtained from Peters’ files,” wrote the band council recently in its petition for an injunction. “INAC has requested an immediate review of Peters social assistance program as a result.”Andrew Genaille wrote to INAC March 20 alleging former councillor Leanne Peters’ mother, Donna Peters, had been receiving social assistance since 2011 and didn’t qualify.“Donna Peters owns her own home,” he wrote. “Donna Peters husband, Clifford Peters, already receives disability. Clifford Peters also receives a paycheque from Peters First Nations. Donna Peters is Leanne Peters mother, and sister in law to both Victoria Peters and Norma Webb.”Victoria Peters used that email to amend Peters’ petition for an injunction two weeks ago, that was first filed last November.APTN can confirm between 2012 and 2015 Donna Peters received all the social assistance funding – about $12,000 annually – based on the band council’s ledgers for those years. APTN can also confirm Clifford Peters received about $9,000 a year from the band during that time partially for odd jobs, like snow removal.When APTN called the home of Donna and Clifford Peters, Donna answered and quickly hung up when asked about the payments.Peters also refused to comment on the allegations. Webb first said she couldn’t comment because the documents were stolen, then suggested they may be fabricated and demanded to know APTN’s source of information.APTN informed Webb the ledgers showing the allocations were, at the very least, with their accountant who prepared them, as APTN has emails the accountant sent council during those years. The emails had digital copies of the ledgers as attachments.INAC was also told by another member of the band in March that she was aware that other people were being denied social assistance.“Due to all of the court proceeding in progress at the Band Level, this was used to deny access to the social program delivery at the request of Peters Band Members,” wrote Samantha Peters to INAC. “I would like it noted on record that Victoria is getting paid to deliver a program that nobody seems to have access to.”APTN is unaware of where Indigenous Affairs is with its investigation into the social assistance program but INAC has appointed a financial investigator in Ottawa to assist the Vancouver regional office.Samantha Peters has been a thorn in the side of council since 2012 when she first began fighting for 66 people to become members of the band. The majority had status through Peters but were not members and not has been approved for membership, including children of current band members.But it’s been a fight that started much earlier and has been happening since Peters got control over its membership through Section 10 of the Indian Act about 30 years ago.Council is accused of limiting membership since 1987, thus staying in power all these years as Peters band is basically one big family – everyone is related, yet don’t get along.It’s divided the nation, just not evenly as the one side has had the votes to stay in power leaving Samantha Peters’ side of the family, about 18 members, on the outside, as previously reported by APTN.In depth: Promise to dying mother sees daughter take on ‘rigged’ band council to bring her family homeRelated: Elder died wanting to be member of reserve she was born onA review of the ledgers between 2012 and 2015, show the lion’s share of funding those years went to members who are known to vote for council.In fact, in the 2014/15 fiscal year 93.1 per cent of funding, just under $500,000, went to council, their families and those who voted for them.The fiscal year before that it was 91.2 per cent of about $400,000 in funding.On top of the funding from INAC, Peters band also receives money for health and payments for hydro and forestry. APTN has learned the band council was able to draw from other revenue and trust accounts to make up for deficits, like in 2013-14 when it pulled about $285,000 from the accounts according to a band council resolution and an email from their accountant.Graph is based on the 2014/15 ledger belonging to Peters First Nation.Some members who voted for council are said, according to court documents, to allegedly received “questionable payments”.Andrew Genaille, a filmmaker and writer, and his sister Lisa Genaille, who is taking steps to start medical school, are suing the band for “misusing their powers” by allegedly appointing themselves to paid positions, refusing band members “equitable access” to resources and receiving inappropriate payments.Both were once close to the council and describe growing up in the band office as their mother, Frances Genaille, worked there for three decades as the assistant band administrator until late last year when she was fired. She is suing the band for wrongful dismissal.The siblings were so close to council that when it received 66 membership applications in 2013 council hired the siblings to review the applicants.Lisa and Andrew say when they got access to all the band’s files and they learned how the band was allegedly being operated.“The band’s archives and record keeping were done very poorly and were very disorganized,” Andrew alleges in court, saying he was given “unlimited access” to files.He tried to hold council accountable but it didn’t last long.“Once I began questioning Victoria Peters about questionable payments being made,” Andrew details in an affidavit, “she would not provide answers to any of my questions and I was no longer allowed access to the archives.”Those questionable payments allegedly include money going to Victoria Peters, as a review of the ledgers show she was allocated much more than what she claimed to INAC in the band’s annual audits.Victoria Peters claimed about $90,000 in salary and $8,000 in expenses but a review of the ledger that year shows she was allocated closer to $170,000, while Webb claimed $35,000 and was allocated $63,000. Leanne Peters claimed $12,000 and was allocated $17,000.Graph is based on the 2014/15 ledger belonging to Peters First Nation.In the 2013/14 fiscal year, Victoria Peters claimed $88,000 while the ledgers shows she allocated $142,000. Webb claimed $24,000 and was allocated $53,000. Leanne claimed $6,000 and was allocated $9,000.Various programs Victoria Peters was in charge of saw her collect large sums but when asked about them Victoria Peters refused to respond.Graph is based on the 2013/14 ledger belonging to Peters First Nation.One of the questions was about allocations made to one of her children, a minor – one was for hundreds of dollars for “rent” and $6,000 under the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program and another $15,000 was allocated to Victoria from a total budget of $31,000.APTN has been told there is nothing to suggest the child qualified for the funding and Victoria Peters refused to comment when asked.Victoria Peters also controlled a large budget co-funded by the First Nations Health Authority and INAC.In 2014/15, the band council received about $140,000 in funding under the FNHA and $70,000 was allocated to Victoria Peters, while the majority of the rest was allocated to people who vote for council and just under $8,000 went to families known to vote against council.Victoria Peters would not respond to questions about her qualifications to hold the position or why she was claiming so much money from the programs.That same year the Peters band had its books audited by a firm in Chilliwack, B.C. who found a list of issues with Victoria Peters’ bookkeeping.“Supporting documents for social assistance and payroll transactions are weak,” wrote the firm MNP after an audit of the bands books. “Cheque requisition forms should be used to show evidence of council approval for social assistance and payroll expenditures.”MNP also found that social assistance reporting to INAC was not consistent with “actual expenditures incurred.”Program reimbursement forms and invoices didn’t have signed authorization of chief and council and complete budget information was not prepared for all band operations.“Expense approval process and supporting documentation is weak which could result in inappropriate payments,” wrote MNP. “In addition, insufficient processes and controls results in increased audit work.”MNP also had a problem with people receiving payments from the band that had cheque-signing authority, which was Victoria Peters and Chief Norma Webb.“Recipients of payments who have cheque signing authority should not sign cheques made out to themselves,” the auditor wrote. “Cheques should be signed by authorized individuals who are not also the payee on the cheque.”Meanwhile, the two elders on Peters say are not surprised by APTN’s investigation.“We’ve known this for 30 years,” said Robert Peters Jr., whose son is currently before the Federal Court of Canada asking the court to appoint him as a member as council rejected him.“It’s just awful how they treat people.”Robert Wilmer Peters. APTN photo: Luke Smith.His brother, Ed Peters, 74, is the eldest and his children are not members either as their applications were part of the 66 that were denied. They are members of the Seabird Island First Nation just across the Fraser River.“We just want it to be fair for everyone,” said Ed Peters, adding he believes council is fueled by “greed.”He also said jobs Victoria Peters holds, and all others held by Webb and former councillor Leanne Peters, were never posted to for everyone to apply.“My daughter is the financial advisor for Seabird. She could run the finances at Peters but she never got the chance,” he said.Samantha Peters also had to look for work at a different nearby First Nation where she works in the forestry sector of the band. Peters has logging rights to land and Samantha said she’s never been approached to help the band.“On more than one occasion I have openly extended an invitation to chief and council to help with negotiations, agreements, forestry, resources,” she said. “I never heard back from them.”She said there are a number of qualified people from Peters with various expertise but are not included.“They use their own personal discretion too often and it’s unprofessional and it costs the band money,” said Samantha. “This is what they learned and it’s dangerous.”kjackson@aptn.calast_img read more

We can be really proud of Muskrat Falls megaproject Williams tells inquiry

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. – Former premier Danny Williams told the Muskrat Falls inquiry on Monday that the wildly overbudget megaproject was in Newfoundland and Labrador’s best interest — and critics who attack him for championing it are “reckless.”Williams maintained “good intentions and good faith” were behind the planning of the hydroelectric dam that has doubled its estimated cost, leaving the province’s ratepayers worried the endeavour might be paid out of their pockets.“This is something we can be really proud of,” the boisterous former Tory premier said of the Labrador project.“The fact that the project is getting disparaged reflects on all the people who worked so hard in order to put this together.”The independent inquiry, led by provincial Supreme Court Justice Richard LeBlanc, is looking into cost and schedule overruns of the $12.7-billion dam on the lower Churchill River.The 824-megawatt hydroelectric dam, being developed by the Crown-owned Nalcor Energy, will send power to Newfoundland and later Nova Scotia through subsea cables.During his term, Williams championed Muskrat Falls as a form of energy independence from Quebec, before retiring from politics shortly after announcing the plan in 2010.The dam near Happy Valley-Goose Bay has since been described as “the greatest fiscal mistake in Newfoundland and Labrador’s history” by current Liberal Premier Dwight Ball.Williams, a businessman and lawyer, was comfortable and confident on the stand on Monday – but he didn’t mince words when addressing criticisms from his detractors.Commission co-counsel Barry Learmonth asked Williams to respond to criticisms that he pushed the megaproject through for the sake of his own ego and legacy.Williams called such criticisms “reckless, irresponsible and shameful.”“Nothing, I’m under oath, could be further from the truth,” said Williams.Williams maintained that his government “turned over every stone” by researching financial and legal options before his successor as Tory leader and premier, Kathy Dunderdale, sanctioned Muskrat Falls in December 2012.Williams also praised a paper that historian Jason Churchill presented to the inquiry last month. It found that Quebec’s stronghold on the Churchill River’s resources has long blocked Newfoundland and Labrador from accessing elusive energy markets.Williams detailed his own frustrations with Quebec, including the long-standing debate over Labrador’s borders — which, according to commission exhibits, are not reflected in some Quebec maps.Williams also referred to former premier Jean Lesage’s 1965 comments that any electricity passing through Quebec territory would “become property of Hydro-Quebec.”“They will do whatever they can to cut us off, it’s shocking,” Williams said. “(But) I need to point out that we still tried.”Learmonth asked Williams about testimony from megaproject scholar Bent Flyvbjerg, who said last month there can be an increased risk of cost overruns when those overseeing the project have less experience in hydroelectric projects.But Williams said he was “not at all concerned” the Nalcor Energy team was underqualified to oversee a hydroelectric project, despite mainly being experts in oil and gas projects.He said he had no reason to believe Nalcor staff had misrepresented cost estimates in communications with him.Williams also dismissed the “rumours” that he continued to influence Muskrat Falls management decisions after he resigned as premier in 2010, attributing such comments to “Danny haters.”“The day I went out the door, I was done,” said Williams. “Whoever is putting that out there is putting it out there for the wrong reasons.”Williams said concerns over doubled power rates are the result of “fear-mongering,” and the project’s long-term benefits will outweigh rate increases that Williams said were on the horizon anyway.“Critics can’t throw all of this on the back of Muskrat Falls,” said Williams. “I can guarantee the people of this province that these rates will not double as a result of Muskrat Falls.”The former premier said Nalcor will become more profitable over time, and its profits will help mitigate the costs.“There was never an understanding that we would get this for free,” Williams said of Muskrat Falls.Williams will continue his testimony Tuesday.last_img read more

Grande Prairie RCMP Lay Charges Following Search Warrant

first_imgApproximately 32 grams of Methamphetamine10 Fentanyl tabletsApproximately 1.5 grams of Fentanyl8 grams of CocaineTwo license plates Additional weapons A stolen vehicle 2 Firearmscenter_img GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – On the evening of Friday, May 10, the Grande Prairie RCMP Crime Reduction Unit executed a search warrant at a residence located in the City of Grande Prairie.The search warrant was in connection to a possible stolen vehicle to the residence.According to RCMP, one individual has been charged, and the following items were seized and recovered as a result of the investigation; Facing charges is 35-year-old Shane Anthony Haugen of Grande Prairie.Haugen is facing the following charges:Possession of property obtained by crime x 6Unsafe storage of a firearm x 2Possession for the purpose of trafficking x 3Possession of a weapon for a dangerous purposeObstruction of a peaceUnauthorized possession of a firearm/ammunitionHaugen remains in custody and is scheduled to appear at Grande Prairie Provincial Court on May 13, 2019.last_img read more