Insurance company Mapfre to stop underwriting new coal mines and power plants

first_imgInsurance company Mapfre to stop underwriting new coal mines and power plants FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Global insurance group Mapfre SA will no longer underwrite construction of coal mines and coal-fired power plants or invest in electric utilities that derive at least 30% of their revenue from coal-produced energy, the company announced during its annual general meeting March 8.One-third of the global reinsurance market has restricted cover for coal projects, according to a December 2018 report from the U.S.-focused arm of the international Unfriend Coal campaign, which has been pushing European insurers away from coal and other fossil fuels.Lucie Pinson, European coordinator for Unfriend Coal, in a news release called the announcement “woefully short of the action necessary to completely phase out coal in Europe by 2030” because it did not mention plans for restricting coal infrastructures, divesting shareholdings or applying the policy to its reinsurance business.Mapfre companies in Spain and Portugal are expected to be carbon-neutral by 2021, when carbon emissions from the insurance company will be reduced by 61%, a Mapfre release said.Mapfre joins Vienna Insurance Group AG, Generali, Munich Re Co., Swiss Reinsurance Co. Ltd., Allianz SE, Zurich Insurance Group AG, Scor SE and Axa in backing away from coal investing.More ($): Global insurer Mapfre to stop underwriting new coal projectslast_img read more

Using the Windows 10 update to enhance the ATM experience

first_imgNearly a third of Americans visit the ATM at least once a week.1 Even after 50 years, ATMs continue to be an important self-service channel between credit unions and members looking to deposit checks, withdraw cash or check their balance.Research from Mercator Advisory Group shows that while members value the convenience of ATM locations and surcharge-free access the most when it comes to ATMs (both of which they receive as part of the CO-OP ATM network), as technology evolves they are wanting more from the ATM experience.2At the same time, an important industry mandate is fast approaching that will have significant impact on the world of ATMs. Beginning January 14, 2020 credit unions that have not upgraded their ATMs to the Windows 10 operating system will no longer have access to security updates, security patches, non-security hotfixes, free or paid support options and online technical content updates supported by Microsoft.But Windows 10 isn’t just about security and PCI-compliance; the upgrade is designed to equip your ATMs to support the features your members expect and to respond to the video- and app-based platforms of the future. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Woman’s search for birth parents leads to landmark S.Korea adoption ruling

first_imgThe ruling officially registers Bos as the child of a man who, according to a DNA test ordered by the court earlier this year, is 99.9981% likely her biological father.That designation could entitle Bos to inheritance. The ruling could also lead to more adoptees with limited or no records to apply for South Korea citizenship, according to the Justice Ministry.The man was identified only by his surname, with no contact details and Bos said the family wished to remain anonymous.Bos said with the positive paternity test and the court ruling, the family finally agreed she could meet her father as soon as next week.Long search for answersIn 1983, a two-year-old Bos was found abandoned in a market south of Seoul. Less than a year later, she was adopted by an American family.Bos, who now lives in the Netherlands with her Dutch husband, knew from childhood she was adopted. Her search for her biological parents only began after the birth of her own daughter, who made Bos realize what it would mean to abandon a child at that age.“At that point I realized that there is trauma involved in adoption, and it is much more complex than the saviour story,” Bos said.After several years of searching archives in South Korea, a break came in 2016 when a genealogy website matched her to a young South Korean man, whose grandfather was found to be Bos’ biological father.Bos said she took the case to court after exhausting all other ways of trying to speak to him and his family to find out about her mother.“I even went to one of their houses and begged, literally, on my knees. And they called the police on me.”Bos said she would not sign away any rights to inheritance but her primary goal was to speak to her father and eventually identify her mother.“Without that legal help, I would still be in the dark,” Bos said. “I would still have no options.” Topics : Decades after she was sent for adoption in the United States, Kara Bos’ quest to find her birth parents in South Korea moved a step closer on Friday when a Seoul court ruled that a South Korean man was her biological father.The ruling is the first of its kind in South Korea, which Amnesty International once dubbed the “longest and largest supplier of international adoptees”.It sets the stage for potentially thousands of other adoptees to be officially registered as children of their birth parents, with implications for inheritance and citizenship laws.center_img While laws vary widely from country to country, many jurisdictions are providing more information to adopted children about their biological parents. Advocates say South Korea’s policies remain relatively restrictive.Bos, whose birth name is Kang Mee-sook, broke into tears as she left the courtroom. Removing a medical mask, she said in Korean: “Mom. Can you recognize my face? Please come to me.”Bos is one of more than 200,000 Korean children adopted overseas in the past 60 years, and her struggle to identify her parents highlights the challenges for many adoptees, said Rev. Do-hyun Kim, who heads KoRoot, a charity that works with adoptees.”I think Kara’s journey, Kara’s fight, is meaningful because it reminds us that parents, society, and the state itself has public responsibility to clearly inform a child born in South Korean society about their roots,” he said.last_img read more