Syracuse unravels in opening moments of 2nd half in 6-3 loss to NC State

first_imgWhen Georgia Allen kicked the ball back to Mackenzie Vlachos to signal the start of the second half, Syracuse knew the next 45 minutes could be the defining game of its season. Despite trailing 2-1 to No. 23 North Carolina State, the game was far from over. SU proved it could score, which it did in the fourth minute, and had matched the Wolfpack’s intensity and quality throughout the first half.Three minutes later, all Syracuse could do was try to avoid further embarrassment.Two minutes into the half, quick, one-touch passing between NC State’s Kia Rankin and Tziarra King sent Maxine Blackwood through on goal, where she slid the ball past a charging Jordan Harris for the visitor’s third goal of the night. A minute later, Mia Thillet laced a pinpoint through ball across to field to an oncoming Rankin, who provided a clinical finish.“The five minutes before or after a half starts and a half ends and the five minutes after a long stoppage, you’ve got to stay switched on,” SU head coach Phil Wheddon said. “We have to make sure we don’t allow service, make sure that our body position is such that we don’t allow players to run through us and around us.”The two goals buried the Orange’s chances of a win or draw, and only marked half of the damage Syracuse (3-10, 0-5 Atlantic Coast) would endure in the second half in an eventual 6-3 loss to NC State (9-3-2, 2-2-1) on Thursday night at SU Soccer Stadium. The defeat marks SU’s eighth straight, the longest such streak in program history.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBefore the Wolfpack put on a scoring clinic, SU had its dream start.The Orange earned a corner kick in the fourth minute and capitalized in an unconventional way. Sydney Brackett curled the ball into a packed six-yard box where NC State goalkeeper Sydney Wootten stood stagnant near the back post. When Wootten saw Brackett’s strike curling inside the front post, she lunged forward to try and swat it away, but instead palmed it into the roof of the net. It was SU’s first goal in 423 minutes, and the Orange celebrated like it.When the ball bulged into the net, all seven SU players in the box put their arms out and sprinted at Brackett, but the junior evaded her teammates’ embrace. With a big grin on her face, Brackett leapt and ran toward the Syracuse bench while all nine other field players chased after her. As she walked back to her position and prepared for play to restart, she continued to laugh and smile.“That’s what we needed,” Wheddon said. “You want to score early, and you want to try, from that point, to maintain the lead.”But the Orange’s glee was short-lived. Its first lead since Sept. 13 was cancelled after just seven minutes when Ricarda Walkling found Blackwood darting behind Shannon Aviza and Clarke Brown, the left side of SU’s back line. Walkling slipped a through ball in between the two defenders and to the feet of Blackwood, who took two touches before smashing the ball beyond Lysianne Proulx and into the top-left corner.After conceding, Syracuse struggled to keep possession, often booting the ball upfield to Allen, SU’s sole striker, in a sea of red jerseys. On the rare occasion Allen got a touch on the ball, she was immediately dispossessed by a swarm of Wolfpack defenders. NC State’s pressure and time on the ball finally broke down the Orange six minutes after its equalizer.King snuck up on Kate Donovan from behind, swiped the ball, and drove 35 yards into SU’s penalty area before beating Proulx with a low, right-footed strike.“She’s fast. She makes quick decisions,” Brown said about King, who has eight goals on the season. “(The second goal of the game) was a quick turnaround and we were out of position and not as close as we should be. It was a lack of communication. We need to be more alert at all times.”For the remainder of the first half, Syracuse reversed the narrative. It used solid link-up play and smart decisions in the middle and attacking third to create three shots in the opening 45 minutes.In the 25th minute, Brackett and Allen combined to send Kate Hostage, who returned from a left ankle injury after missing three games, through on goal. Hostage got within ten yards of the goal and fired a shot into Wootten’s foot and out for a corner kick.“We made sure we got the little details down,” Hostage said. “We had a lot of creativity and combination play. It’s just a couple defensive details and keeping the ball (letting us down).”The Wolfpack added two more goals through Blackwood and Kursten von Klahr while SU achieved its highest single-game goal total of the season with second-half goals from Meghan Root and Steph deLaforcade. Despite having its best offensive outing of 2018, the Orange must continue to strive toward complete, 90-minute performances, Wheddon said.“We enjoyed celebrating the goals but at the end of the day that wasn’t enough,” Wheddon said. “I’m very disappointed that we conceded the number of goals that we did, especially because we felt like we were in the game the whole time.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on October 4, 2018 at 11:15 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edulast_img read more

Freeholders To Rethink ‘Sanctuary City’ Resolution

first_imgDuring the meeting, county administrator Terri O’Connor said the resolution had been put forth by Scharfenberger, but he said in a later interview that it had come in response to a resident raising the issue at a meeting several months ago. Before the freeholders were due to vote on the resolution, county counsel Michael Fitzgerald cited some concerns he had about the measure, including using the word illegal “in places that it probably shouldn’t have been.” He said he was unsure he had drafted a resolution “that properly conveys the freeholders’ concerns or what the freeholders’ expressions are for purposes of doing this.” “I think that the timing of this is shockingly inappropriate,” said Red Bank resident Cathleen Goode of the resolution. “And I have to tell you this embarrasses me for our county, for the county in which I live and I vote.” Yeimi Hernandez, a DACA recipient who read a statement on behalf of the Latino Coalition, criticized the freeholders for practicing “shameful politics.” The Rev. Jonathan Elsensohn, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Freehold, said that in recent years, fewer people are using a food pantry in town. Subsequently, Scharfenberger made the motion to table the resolution. His office did not respond toa request for comment. “And I think before we do anything that is I think this important or of this much interest (to) everybody who’s here and beyond, I think we owe it to everybody to take a look at it, as Mr. Fitzgerald said (and) make sure the wording is correct to convey I think what the motivation was from our standpoint and also look into some of the things we heard here,” Scharfenberger said from the dais. “If we’re satisfied and we want to revisit it in a couple of weeks, then so be it.” Fellow freeholder Patrick Imprevedutosaid officials would “come back in the futurewith our decision.” But critics of the freeholders’ resolution gathered en masse at the board’s meeting. The timing of the resolution coincided with the nation confronting a crisis on its southern border and amid concerns about the treatment of border crossers in federal detention facilities. One woman at the meeting held up a photo that appeared in that day’s edition of The New York Times and elsewhere of drowned migrant Oscar Martinez and his young daughter, whose bodies washed ashore in the Rio Grande River. In 2017, authorities at the MiddlesexCounty Jail did not honor an ICE detainer, oradministrative hold, on a Mexican national,who was released and later charged in a triplemurder in Missouri, in November 2018. “We’re just looking at this from a law enforcement perspective,” freeholder and state Assembly candidate Gerry P. Scharfenberger said after the meeting. “And there’s been documented instances where the lack of communication between the state and the federal government have resulted in people who probably shouldn’t have been released being released. The real motivation was just to make sure that the law is followed and cooperation between law enforcement is an ongoing thing.” Rita Dentino, director of Casa Freehold, an immigrant rights organization, told the freeholders that her organization was “horrified” by the proposed resolution. “We believe it is important to welcome immigrants living among us, regardless ofthe immigration status,” she said. “They cutyour lawns, make your food and repair yourhomes. Do not fall prey to the notion that weare criminals and need to be feared.” But politicians in Republican-controlled parts of the state like Monmouth have pushed back against the Murphy administration. In Middletown Township, where Murphy lives, the township committee voted in April for a resolution saying it would not be a sanctuary city and opposing New Jersey becoming a sanctuary state. The language in the freeholders’ resolution was similar to the one in Middletown. “Our best supposition for this decline is that members of the undocumented community are no longer coming out to receive vital services because they fear for their safety,” he said. “This resolution will only contribute to that culture of fear and will impede our ability, as people of faith, to care for our neighbors.” “This document will take this level of fear, which is at its highest in our 16 years of existence, … to a new level of high fear throughout Monmouth County,” she said. center_img By Philip Sean Curran FREEHOLD – On a hot June afternoon, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders faced a blizzard of criticism about its proposed resolution opposing New Jersey becoming a sanctuary state for illegal immigrants. “The proposed resolution illustrates the Board of Chosen Freeholders’ desire to divide the residents of our county rather than to bring us together for the betterment of our community,” they said. “We would encourage our Freeholders to focus on priorities directly impacting Monmouth County’s residents every day rather than fueling an already divisive cultural conversation.” The board, at its June 26 meeting, voted to table a measure that said, in part, that “sanctuary policies are harmful to the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the county of Monmouth.” Nationally, immigration has become a subject of concern among a growing number of Americans. A Gallup poll released in June found immigration ranked as the country’s second biggest problem, at 23 percent, behind government, at 26. This was the first time in Gallup’s tracking of the issue that it rated so high a concern, the polling agency said. In February, the Pew Research Center said a “majority” of the roughly 10.7 million undocumented immigrants in the United States live in New Jersey and five other states. New Jersey was home to an estimated 475,000 as of 2016, behind California (2.2 million), Texas (1.6 million), Florida (775,000), and New York (725,000) and ahead of Illinois (400,000), the report found. One estimate, by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, said Monmouth County was home to 23,000 undocumented immigrants in 2017. New Jersey, home to the fifth largest population of undocumented immigrants in the country, has provided them with college financial aid and earmarked $2.1 million to pay for legal aid for their immigration cases since Murphy, a Democrat, became governor last year. In November, state Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal issued an “immigrant trust directive” to all law enforcement in the state saying they cannot stop, arrest or question someone based on their actual or suspected immigration status, and cannot participate in immigration enforcement actions by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), among other restrictions. The directive carved out some exemptions. Freeholder Lillian G. Burry said the decision to table the resolution was not because freeholders agreed with some of the “disturbing” comments by the public during the meeting, where freeholders were called hateful. “Gov. Phil Murphy and the New Jersey Legislature has enacted legislation providing benefits to illegal undocumented immigrants,” the resolution read in declaring that the county will “never become home to a sanctuary city.” The Trump administration has taken a tough stance on illegal immigration. In April, ICE said 12 of 123 “immigration violators” arrested earlier in the year were from Monmouth County. Moira Nelson and Michael Penna, the two Democrats running for freeholder this November, released a statement criticizing the board after the June 26 meeting. “The reason is we obviously put forth the wrong message in the way it was written,” she said of the decision to table the resolution. “So I want to see it reworded. I want the true intent of what we have in mind to come for ward.” last_img read more

Bombers flying high to open High School hoop season

first_imgBy Bruce FuhrThe Nelson Daily SportsA nine-point run before halftime was the straw that broke the camels back for the L.V. Rogers Bombers.Norkam of Kamloops blew open a close 35-30 game en route to a 60-43 victory over the Bombers in the final of the Westsyde Wundas High School Boy’s Basketball Tournament Saturday in Kamloops.“A disappointing final 40 seconds of the second quarter proved to be the TSN turning point in the game,” said Bomber coach Blair D’Andrea. “The Bombers allowed three uncontested three-pointers from the Saints to put them in a 14-point hole going into halftime.”In front of a loud partisan crowd, the Bombers worked hard together as a team, with excellent relief minutes from Jessie Zak and Jae Tak to surprise the Saints and keep the game close early.Jason D’Andrea, named tournament Most Valuable Player, paced the Bombers in the finale with 28 points.Clay Rickaby added a double double with 15 rebounds and 16 points while John Zak added 10 and Maverick Seed chipped in with eight points.LVR advanced to the final with a 51-41 victory over Valleyview Vikings of Kamloops. D’Andrea led LVR with 20 points. Seed had eight while Rickaby was another force on the boards with 15.Seeing competition for the first time this season, LVR opened the tournament by smashing Vernon Secondary 52-38.Leading 29-20 at halftime, the Bombers turned up the defensive pressure on Valleyview to register the win.D’Andrea scored 17 for LVR.“The boys played extremely well together, showing off a team-based attack and unity that was fantastic for this early in the season,” said Blair D’Andrea.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more