Mountain Rescue team on search for missing person

first_imgA crew from the Donegal Mountain Rescue team have been dispatched on an emergency callout this Wednesday morning.In the last hour, volunteers were tasked to assist in the search for a missing person.Update 3pm: The search has been stood down  Mountain Rescue team on search for missing person was last modified: July 3rd, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img

Geocaching in 2018: A year in review

first_img SharePrint RelatedGroundspeak Weekly Mailer – December 28, 2011December 28, 2011In “Community”Welcome to the New Look of The Geocaching BlogJune 7, 2013In “Community”Geocaching 2 by 2 – Power your Relationships with GeocachingJune 3, 2013In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter” Geocaching in 2018 brought lots of adventure, plenty of new geocaches, and even more “Found it” logs. As we start the new year, it’s fun to look back on all the geocaching happenings in 2018. Here are 18 of them in an infographic!But remember, it’s not all about the numbers! There were geocaching adventures shared by friends and precious memories created on the geo-trail with family. In the end, what really matters are the adventures you went on!Instagram: GC2Y8Q8 “Made in Canada, eh!”Facebook: “Chasing after one more geocache…” Share your favorite geocaching moment from 2018 in the comments and Happy Geocaching in 2019 from all the Lackeys at Geocaching HQ!Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Even Microsoft Wishes Internet Explorer 6 Would Just Die Already

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts For the most part, Internet Explorer 6 falls well below 5% for many countries. The problem, it seems, is in Asia. China tops the list of problem countries, with 34%, while South Korea comes in with around 25%, followed by a number of countries in the region at around 10%. IE6 only accounts for 3% of browser usage in the U.S., while both Norway and Finland lead the world with under 1% each. Why do people still use the now ancient browser? Some companies actually use it as a form of control. Websites like Facebook and YouTube are not accessible using IE6, meaning employees can’t mess around while they’re on the job. But why is the browser so popular in countries like China and South Korea? According to Download Squad‘s Sebastian Anthony, it could be a result of piracy. “China is notorious for its number of pirate Windows installs, with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer even claiming that as 9 in 10 copies of Windows in China are pirated,” writes Anthony. Nonetheless, even usage there has dropped dramatically, with IE6 falling from more than 50% last August to 35% today. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Browsers#Microsoft#news#NYT#web mike melanson Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Web developers, designers and users rejoice: Internet Explorer 6 use is quickly on the decline. Even Microsoft, the company that released Internet Explorer 6 more than a decade ago, has joined in on the celebration.“Its name was Internet Explorer 6. Now that we’re in 2011, in an era of modern web standards,it’s time to say goodbye,” writes the company on a website it launched today to track the browser’s demise.“This website is dedicated to watching Internet Explorer 6 usage drop to less than 1% worldwide, so more websites can choose to drop support for Internet Explorer 6, saving hours of work for web developers,” writes Microsoft.As part of its countdown, Microsoft released a detailed map of where the browser is still being used the most.last_img read more

Are Your Conversion Rates Competitive? Find Out. Take the HubSpot Inbound Marketing Survey.

first_img The ticket winners will be announced a week from today. Winners of the cash prizes will be announced when the survey closes on Sept 22. Folks who complete the survey within the next week will be eligible for both prizes; if you complete it after that, you’ll only be eligible for the cash. . in Cambridge, MA, on Sept 8, and four $500 cash prizes.  Topics: How does your marketing mix or conversion rate compare with your industry’s average? We’ll collect responses, then send you the results so you can see how your company stacks up. To provide some benchmarks and help you answer those questions, today we’re launching the . But how does your system stack up with the competition? If you’d like to know how your conversion rates, your marketing mix or your inbound marketing strategies compare with other companies in your industry, take five minutes to complete In case that’s not incentive enough, we’re giving away six great prizes to people who complete the survey — two tickets to the HubSpot Inbound Marketing Survey So what are you waiting to for? Get on over to the survey and Originally published Aug 13, 2008 9:57:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Inbound Marketing Summit win those prizes ! If you’re a savvy marketer, you have a range of online tools and techniques you use to reach new customers efficiently. Conversion Rate Optimization this easy survey Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

3 Social Media Marketing Tips From Rapper Lil’ Wayne

first_img I hope that you found these tips useful.  If you did, would you please retweet or “Like” this post 😉  Thanks! Topics: recent overtaking of the Guinness World Record content creation in 24 hours certainly did the job.  Only hours after Figure out what distinguishes you from the competition, and make sure you share this with your audience.  This will not only help you to attract a loyal following, but it will also help you because he wanted his fans to know he loved them.  As a result of his continued effort to share remarkable content with the world, not only was Weezy able to maintain his fan base, but he actually increased it!  that your competitors may not be focused on.   2. Never Stop Creating Content 3 Social Media Marketing Tips From Rapper Lil’ Wayne Don’t make your visitors’ experience more difficult by throwing a barrage of links and choices in front of them.  Provide them with and then offer them one simple next step.  WeezyThanxYou Although there are thousands of rappers in the world, Lil’ Wayne uses his uniqueness to help him stand out in the overpopulated sea of lyricists.  His love of rock music, the Green Bay Packers, and his brief stint in jail are just a few of the things that Wayne uses to distinguish himself from others.  Originally published Feb 17, 2011 12:00:00 PM, updated July 03 2013 Social Media start ranking for long tail keywords is the key to any inbound marketing strategy.  Oreo claimed the record 1. Be Unique As an internet marketer having a social media presence isn’t enough.  The social media landscape is always changing, and because of this it’s important to understand the most effective ways to utilize the tools available for your marketing efforts.  Here are a couple things all internet marketers can learn from Lil’ Waynes success. valuable content Lil’ Wayne shares a lot of exclusive content with his fans on Facebook.  He also makes it extremely clear to them how they can show their appreciation by including a simple “Like this post” call to action in many of his posts.  By telling his fans what to do next Lil’ Wayne is making his fan’s lives simpler and helping them with the decision-making process.  This works incredibly well on his Facebook Page as we can see with all of his posts including the most recent Guinness World Record post.  Facebook Growing a following and attracting inbound links is a long gradual process.  Don’t lose hope if you don’t see immediate results.  Quality and consistency of If Lil’ Wayne hadn’t already established himself as one of social media’s elite, his most for themselves with 114,619 “Likes,” Lil’ Wayne and his fans obliterated it with a whopping 588,243.  Now I know some of you are probably thinking, “well he probably just has a lot more fans than Oreo,” but that isn’t the whole story.  Oreo has 16,711,040 fans on Facebook to Lil’ Waynes 20,112,726, and although this is a significant advantage, it does not completely explain why he got more than five times as many “Likes” on his post.  for most “Likes” to a post on You would think that being locked up might put someone’s rap career on hold.  But instead of slowing down, Lil Wayne seemed to work even harder while he was in prison.  As well as continuing to write songs, he also launched a blog called Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack 3. Tell Your Fans What to Do!last_img read more

What Is the Most Important Social Media Metric? [Marketing Cast]

first_img Social media allows you to grow your reach and get more people into the top of the funnel. The more people you engage with—the more people who like you, follow you on Twitter and read your blog—the more people will be interested in what your business is about. “When you are doing something valuable, people will follow you,” says David. , we examine this topic of social media measurement. and that is how our marketing team operates efficiently. closed-loop marketing Grow the Top of the Funnel Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Keep Measuring the Bottom of the Funnel What is the most important social media metric? This question comes up time and again in our webinars, in the comments of our blog posts and during conferences. There is one critical metric you should track when engaging in social media marketing: sales. Do you agree with sales being the most important metric in social media marketing? Weekly Marketing Cast Once you expand your reach through social media, don’t drop measurement. Evaluate where your qualified leads are coming from and see whether they turn into customers. HubSpot is really passionate about this type of Originally published May 16, 2011 8:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Are you growing your business? “The things you are doing in social media will lead up to that,” says David Meerman Scott, HubSpot’s Marketer in Residence. In today’s episode of the Social Media Analytics Topics:last_img read more

The Top 10 Qualities of High-Quality List Posts

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Originally published Mar 30, 2012 2:09:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Content Types In an online world where the quality of your blog content is only increasing in importance, the fabled ‘list’ post commonly gets a bad rap. It’s unfortunate, but definitely understandable. You can easily drown in a sea of particularly low-quality, low-value lists posts.But hey — not all list posts have to suck! While there are definitely some pretty awful ones out there, you can also find quite a few very valuable, high-quality list posts floating around the internet. So let’s not judge a list post by its title. I’m a firm believer that the list post does have a place in the world of high quality blog content. And to no surprise, this post about lists posts is largely a list post itself. You can be the judge of its quality, but I stand by my beliefs.First, let’s talk a little bit about common misconceptions about list posts. Then we’ll dive into the characteristics of high quality ones so you can start squashing the myth that all list posts are subpar … by writing awesome ones!Common Misconceptions About List PostsLast week, Daily Blog Tips published an article highlighting some common misconceptions about list posts and explaining why it’s silly to think about list posts in those ways. Let’s quickly review the points the article made:”List posts are just for lazy writers.” Pish posh! In fact, when done well (meaning it’s not just three, sentence-long points slapped together), a list post can take just as long — if not longer — than any other type of post for bloggers to write.”List posts aren’t right for my style/niche.” Huh? Why are list posts — a type of post — conceived as fitting only certain industries? A list post could work for any industry, as long as the subject matter and quality fit the audience. “List posts have to be really long.” Wrong, wrong, wrong. There’s no rule that your list post needs to be a laundry list of useless information or that it needs to include a minimum number of items. In fact, a super long, 100-point list runs the risk of sounding daunting to readers, deterring them from reading it and turning them away.The thing is, people love the classic list post! They tell the reader exactly what — and how much of it — they’re going to get out of the post, plus they’re very shareable. They’re also easy to scan, and with so much content available on the web these days, being able to scan a post and still grasp a helpful nugget or two of information is highly valuable. Here are a few examples of the types of list posts we’ve published recently on this very blog, all of which we believe are high quality posts that have performed well in terms of traffic, leads, and inbound links:”9 Ways to Increase Visibility for Your Best Blog Content””7 Keyword Research Mistakes That Stifle Your SEO Strategy””13 Brands Using LinkedIn Company Page Features the Right Way””5 Actionable Insights to Extract From Your Landing Page Analytics”Now for the meaty stuff. If you’re convinced that list posts can be a part of your blogging strategy, make sure the ones you publish include these top 10 qualities of high-quality list posts.1) Includes Items That Stay True to the List Subject/AngleSometimes a blogger will start writing a list about one thing, and then when he/she is done, it turns out to be a list that takes on a completely different angle because their research revealed more information about a slightly different subject. The problem is, this new angle is no longer relevant to their audience. Don’t let this happen to you. If, after your initial research, you find that the points you’ve brainstormed don’t fit with the subject you intended, scrap it and move on.Another common symptom of bad list posts are list items that don’t quite fit with the others. For example, if you notice in this very list post, all of the items on this list are qualities of awesome list post. If one of my points was, in itself, an example of a list post, that wouldn’t make sense, right?  Be consistent and parallel. If you’re writing a list of examples, they should all be examples. If you’re writing a list of best practices, they should all be best practices. It’s easy to stray off-topic when you’re trying to compile a hearty list, but you need to avoid it. Otherwise your list — and your writing — loses its integrity.2) Dense With Valuable Takeaways (No Fluff!)The biggest indicator of a lousy list post is one that contains a ton of fluff and no real, valuable takeaways for the reader. Here’s an example of what we mean:3 Ways to Improve Your Social Media MarketingBe unique! Do something to stand out from your competitors.Take risks! Try out-of-the-box ideas.Measure results! Use your analytics to tell you what’s working.What a fantastic list post! I’ve learned — absolutely nothing. No wonder list posts have a terrible reputation. That took me 60 seconds to write. Sure, on the surface, each of these list points sound valuable. You absolutely should do all these things in your social media marketing. But it doesn’t tell you exactly how to do those things. Your list shouldn’t just give readers a list of things to do and expect them to figure out how to do those things themselves. It should also walk them through the steps required to actually do those things.A great list post nixes the fluff and concretely explains each item in detail. And while every point you make on your list might not be new to all your readers, if a reader walks away thinking, “Well, I already put numbers 3, 4, and 6, into practice, but I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on numbers 1, 2, and 5!” — then you’ve probably got yourself a high-quality list!3) Links to More In-Depth Information When NecessaryOne of the ways you can make sure you’re hitting on point #2 is to direct readers to other resources when necessary. Great list posts are comprehensive. It also means they can get pretty long and unwieldy, especially if you’re truly committed to point #2. That’s why sometimes it’s okay if you have to point your readers to another place for more in-depth information. For example, we recently wrote a list post entitled, “9 Ways to Make Your Marketing Analytics Actionable.” Number 8 on the list reads “Score & Prioritize Your Leads for Sales,” which could be a blog post in itself — and hey … it is! Giving our readers enough information for that section to be truly helpful would have involved copying and pasting the entirety of that post into our list post, and that wouldn’t exactly have been the most helpful choice. So what we did was explain the point in a moderate amount of detail, and then directed readers to the other post where they could find more in-depth information. Don’t be afraid to do this in your own list posts. And if you have to link to an external resource because you haven’t the written the post yourself — great! You’ve just passed off some link love, and you also now have another article idea for your blogging backlog!  4) Explains List Items Using Relatable ExamplesPiggybacking again on point #2, sometimes one of the best ways to adequately explain a point on your list is to use an example to support it. Real examples are ideal, but sometimes even a hypothetical works just as great. In fact, we’ve used each of these example types in the first 3 items on this list! The main thing to consider when selecting or concocting an example is to keep it as relatable to your readers as possible. If the audience of your blog is comprised of a variety of readers representing different industries or businesses (like ours), this can be tricky. The key here is to keep your examples general so that everyone can relate. Here comes a hypothetical example to explain what I mean about using hypothetical examples …In our list post, “7 Keyword Research Mistakes That Stifle Your SEO Strategy,” for example, we use the broad, hypothetical (even mythical!) example of unicorn farms/breeders to more easily explain points 4 and 5 on our list so that everyone could relate.5) Numbered Items This is an easy one. If you’re writing a list-style post — and especially when you use a number in the title of your list post — number your list items! This is particularly important when you have a longer list, because readers like to be able to gauge their progress as they’re reading through the list (i.e. “only halfway to go” or “I’m almost done!”). Readers may also like to reference certain points on a list later or share them with others, and being able to refer to a specific number rather than having to count themselves and say “it’s the 16th item on the list” is a much more user-friendly experience for your blog audience. Don’t make things difficult for your readers.6) Includes an Appropriate Number of List ItemsWhile we’re talking about numbers, let’s clear some misconceptions about them. Some list bloggers are of the camp that you should choose a number before you start writing your list and make sure you have enough points to fit that exact number. We are not. Sitting down and saying you’re going to write a list consisting of 14 items makes no sense. What if there really ends up being only 11 truly solid, valuable items that make up that list? Does that mean you should come up with 3 more forced or somewhat repetitive items just to achieve your goal of 14? We think not.The rule of thumb is: just be comprehensive. This very list post includes 10 items because that’s how many I thought were individually valuable and indicative of a high-quality list post for this particular subject. Originally I had brainstormed 11, but as I started writing, I cut one out because it wasn’t that different from another point, and they could easily be represented as one.As we mentioned before, list posts can easily become unwieldy. When you sit down to start drafting your list post, decide how granular you want to make your topic. This will help make your list more manageable. The title you craft can also help you stay focused. For example, if you’re a plumber writing a list post about the various ways you can unclog a drain, you might decide to stick to “The Top 4 Ways to Unclog a Drain,” rather than writing a lengthy list post covering “The 50 Different Ways to Unclog a Drain.”Furthermore, do some testing and research if you want to glean some best practices for your list posts. An internal study of our own blog, for example, revealed that posts for which the title indicated 6 items or fewer didn’t perform as well as when the title indicated the list contained 7 or more items. The lesson? While we sometimes still write lists posts containing 6 or fewer items, we don’t include the number in the title for those posts. For example, our post, “Why Every Marketer Needs Closed-Loop Reporting” is essentially a list post, but it’s not framed that way in the title since it only includes 6 points. Do your own analysis to determine best practices for your business blog.7) Uses Category Buckets (For Longer Lists)Now, if you had decided to write that list post of 50 different ways to unclog a drain, your list post would look pretty daunting, considering the sheer number of items it would include. In this case, a great practice is to use subheaders to break up your list into categories. This makes the list much more scanable (remember how people love to scan blogs?), and a lot less overwhelming at first glance.For example, when we published “25 Eye-Popping Internet Marketing Statistics for 2012,” we broke up the statistics into 5 sections: “The Internet in 2012,” “Mobile in 2012,” “Social Media in 2012,” “Video in 2012,” and “Ecommerce in 2012.” If some of our readers didn’t give a squat about ecommerce, they could easily scan the post and avoid that section. Perfect!8) Contains Logically Ordered List ItemsYour list, like any other post you’d write, should flow and tell a story. How you do this will definitely depend on the subject and contents of your list, but here are some great organizational structures to choose from: alphabetical (great for glossaries), chronological (great for step-by-step guides), by popularity/importance — most to least or least to most (great for top 10/20/50 lists). Another best practice is to emphasize your strongest points in the beginning, middle, and end of your list to keep readers engaged throughout.When I sat down and brainstormed this list, for example, it was just that — a brainstormed list. It was unorganized and all over the place. But once I’d identified all the points I wanted to include, I rearranged the furniture a bit. I realized how easily numbers 5 and 6 would flow into each other, and how number 5 would make sense after discussing points 2, 3 and 4. Number 1 was a great starting point, and number 10 made the most sense last, since that’s likely the last thing you’d tweak when writing a list post. Sometimes your list points will practically arrange themselves (e.g. “5 Steps to Do X”), and sometimes there won’t be as obvious a story (e.g. “20 Ways to Do Y”). Just put the time into figuring it out and ordering your items as logically as possible.9) Parallel FormattingI’m not as strict about this one as some list post purists, but in general, I agree that your list post should have a consistent and parallel look. Failing to do so only confuses readers, especially when they can’t tell that they’ve moved onto a new item on the list because the header style was inconsistent or under-emphasized.  Here are some helpful guidelines to consider:Try to keep sections similar in length.  Use the same header style to highlight your individual list items, and make sure it stands out.Make sure your list item headers are written in parallel fashion (i.e. if it’s a list of action items, each should be led with a verb)Use images and bullet points to break up text when appropriate.10) Clear and Catchy TitleAs we mentioned in the beginning of this post, one of the reasons people have always loved list posts is because they know exactly what — and how much — they’ll get out of them. There is no guesswork involved, and expectations you’ve set for your readers are very clear. Make sure your title epitomizes that. An effective list post title should accomplish two things in order to entice readers to actually read the post: 1) capture the readers’ attention and 2) clearly indicate the value or what the reader will learn, and 3) indicate how much they will learn with a number.For example, earlier this week, we published “The 7 Aspects of Inbound Marketing Most People Screw Up.” Do you have to wonder what this post will be about? No! You know that after reading this post, you’ll know which 7 parts of inbound marketing people tend to screw up so you can avoid screwing them up, too. And chances are, you probably don’t like to fail, right? So you’re probably kind of intrigued to learn if you’re one of “most people” and, if so, what you should stop screwing up.What’s your take on list posts? What else would you add to our list of high-quality list post qualities? ;-)Image Credit: MStewartPhotographylast_img read more

30-Day Blog Challenge Tip #19: Break Through Late-Onset Writer’s Block

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack From January 2-31, we are challenging everyone to blog more to see firsthand the results that blogging can generate. Participating companies should submit their blog URLs on this page to enter the challenge. Winner(s) will receive a complimentary ticket to INBOUND 2014 and be featured on the HubSpot Inbound Marketing blog.Today’s blogging tip is brought to you by Ginny Soskey, Staff Writer at HubSpot. “You’ve been rocking this blogging challenge for a whole month, so don’t get bogged down in end-of-the-month writer’s block! If you feel like you’ve already blogged about everything you possibly can, think again. There are always going to be new ideas you can blog about — you just have to get inspired. To help, you can use the HubSpot Blog Topic Generator to come up with a week’s worth of brand new topics for your blog in a matter of seconds. Try it out for yourself!”Did you blog today? If yes, submit to the challenge! Originally published Jan 20, 2014 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Blogging Advicelast_img read more

If Everyone Hates Selfies, Why Do They Get So Many Likes?

first_img Originally published Dec 8, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Content Creation Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Almost immediately after “selfies” became a thing, people started bashing them. And sure, that kind of makes sense – there’s something mockery-worthy about taking lots of photos of yourself.But if selfies are so silly, why do they get so much social media engagement (likes, retweets, etc.)? I have a couple of theories, and I’m going to share them with you.1) People like peopleAh, humans. We’re just naturally social, and we want to look at other people (and ourselves – hence the selfie). What other explanation could there be for TMZ?Online, selfies and pictures of people in general get more engagement in the form of likes and comments. A Georgia Institute of Technology study found that Instagram pictures with human faces are 38% more likely to get likes and 32% more likely to get comments than photos with no faces.Social media itself fulfills the need and desire to connect with other people, and it’s easier to do that when you’re looking at an actual person rather than a picture of someone’s lunch order. Basically, this theory boils down to “Hey, look – you have eyes and ears and a nose just like I do! We should be friends!”2) You’re really real!Socialmedialand is a place where we can connect with new people every day, many of whom we don’t know in real life.In any case, pictures of your face allow all people to connect or reconnect with you as a person instead of as a tweet or Facebook post. Sharing selfies is a way of saying, “Hello! This is me, @DrifterMama, and I’m more than just 140 characters of text. I’m a person, too!”Seeing the faces of your virtual friends (which I have more of than real friends) helps you connect with them on a personal level, rather than follow them as a faceless feed of information.3) It’s all about the context, babyThe context of your selfie could also be the reason it’s getting a fair amount of engagement. Are you at #Bonnaroo, or is it your #Birthday? Maybe it’s #TBT (Throwback Thursday) or the ever-popular #MCM/#WCW (Man Crush Monday/Woman Crush Wednesday)?The context, of course, doesn’t have to be connected to a popular hashtag. Life events can impact engagement more than attaching your selfie to a trending topic. Celebrating an occurrence in the moment tends to spread more virally, whether it’s a newly-adopted pet or just an amazing summer day.The context of the image makes people feel good and relate the image to their own lives, compelling them to engage with the photo. Creating context around a selfie makes it feel less like a plea for attention, and more like you’re telling a story.The end… or just the beginning?A lot has been written about improving your selfies, and in my opinion, this post by Dan Zarrella on “The Science of Selfies” is the best of the bunch. In it, he breaks down data from over 160,000 images with the #selfie tag and points out which colors, filters, and hashtags result in the most likes. It’s a great read that helps us understand the psychology behind why people like selfies, and what pushes them over the edge into selfie-hate.Whether you’re snapping a picture of yourself with a friend during a night out or sharing a new hairstyle, selfies have become a staple of social media sharing. After all, if you didn’t take a selfie, how will you prove that it really happened?What are your theories on why selfies are so popular?last_img read more

Amazon Leads the Way With Negotiation Option for Rare Items

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: It’s hard to call Amazon a trendsetter in this field, since eBay has done something similar for over a decade. Still, because of Amazon’s influence over ecommerce trends, we may be able to consider it groundbreaking. What’s this “new” thing they’re doing?Haggling.Sure, eBay is and auction site, where buyers try to outbid each other for anything from socks to one-of-a-kind art pieces. Amazon’s “make an offer” option is, for now, available only for rare pieces like collectibles and fine art. The basic idea behind the two is the same, though. By allowing buyers to make their offers, whether in an auction setting or a haggling scenario, these two ecommerce giants give buyers even more power.How It WorksAs you’ll see in the screenshot below, Amazon provides the option for buyers to either purchase the item at a set price or to make an offer. The offer is delivered directly to the seller, who can either accept that offer or make a counteroffer. The deal is done when the seller either accepts or both parties walk away.Just like haggling in real life, right?Why This Is Big NewsIf eBay has done something along the same lines for years, why is Amazon’s new negotiation option such a big deal? In truth, Amazon is a leader in the ecommerce world. The company has made buying online easier and less expensive than ever. When they break new ground, the rest of the ecommerce world follows.Sure, other websites out there probably haggled with buyers if those buyers were savvy enough to seek out the contact information. As far as a structured, easy way for potential customers to make lower offers, Amazon is leading the pack. They may have already patented either the idea itself or the technology used, but that won’t matter.As we’ve seen, using patented technology for ecommerce isn’t new. Amazon may have the 1-Click buying option, the whole “photos on a white background” technique, and even online gift cards locked down, but that hasn’t stopped others from developing their own versions.The more technology-savvy ecommerce companies out there could very well develop their own version of Amazon’s haggling option. And before they go through that trouble, they have the ultimate example to learn from. If it works for Amazon, we’re sure to see it crop up everywhere.Where It WorksIf you’re thinking that haggling just won’t work for a lot of ecommerce outlets, you’re right. The structure isn’t ideal for everyone, but it is the perfect solution for many. Antique dealers who haven’t considered an online outlet for their goods may find this particular buying option perfect. Fine art sellers could experience a higher number of sales if online shoppers felt they could make an offer. Vintage apparel stores could see a huge surge in sales if buyers had the option of haggling over that Chanel purse.Someone looking for a pack of socks, though? This model isn’t going to work. For that, you could still go to eBay.What do you think about haggling? Is this the future of ecommerce, or will Amazon only be able to use the model for a small selection of items? We’d love your thoughts, so leave a comment! Ecommerce and Amazon Originally published Jan 30, 2015 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more