WELL-KNOWN DONEGAL POET TO READ AT IRISH WRITERS’ CENTRE

first_imgWell-known Co Donegal writer Denise Blake will read this Friday at the Irish Writers’ Centre (1pm) as part of the Lunctime Readings.She was born in Lakewood Ohio in 1958 and returned to Ireland with her parents and family to live in Letterkenny 1969.Her first collection of poetry, Take a Deep Breath, was published by Summer Palace Press. Her second collection, How to Spin Without Getting Dizzy, was published in Spring 2010. She is a regular contributor to RTÉ’s Sunday Miscellany and her work is in five Sunday Miscellany anthologies. She read as part of Poetry Ireland Introductions series, Out to Lunch readings and took part in the Clé Author and Publisher library tour. Her work has been published in The SHOp, Poetry Ireland Review, The Stinging Fly and West 47.She is a founder of the Errigal Writers’ Group and received an MA in poetry from Lancaster University through the Poets’ House. She has wide experience of giving creative writing workshops in national and secondary schools in Donegal as well as working with adult groups.Here is a questions and answer profile with Denise.When did you start writing poetry? Firstly, I know the moment when I started to love poetry, it was when I read Seamus Heaney’s poem, Docker. We were studying the poem as part of the English segment in a foundation course in Magee College and I loved the imagery in the line; He sits, strong and blunt as a Celtic cross. It was the first time that I could see into a poem for myself. The course was to be my return to education but instead it was my awakening to poetry. I was in my thirties and I had young children. I would never have considered writing a poem before that time. I started reading poetry and writing my own pieces. I was so thrilled with myself when I started producing work. The excitement of seeing new words appear has never left me. There were two strong forces in Co. Donegal at the time – The Killybegs Writers Group and Letterkenny Writers Group – so there were people who were supportive and showed great encouragement. Eventually a group of us evolved into Errigal Writers and we still meet twice a month.What’s been the greatest obstacle to becoming (and remaining) a poet?The “who do you think you are?” chorus sitting on my shoulder. But the question could be; what has helped you stay writing? This is a great country for writing and I have had so much support, starting with my local community. There isn’t a week goes by that I am not asked “are you still writing?” by someone who is willing you on. When we first started Errigal Writers we organized Gerard Byrne to give us workshops and the Irish Writers Centre helped us out. We continued to bring other established writers to Donegal over the years and they have all treated us with a professional respect. I was lucky to be chosen for the Writers Workshop in UCG ( as it was then) with Paula Meehan as our facilitator. You can’t get a more professional, and yet compassionate, person to work with. I was fortunate also to be able to do the MA course in the Poets’ House in Falcaragh. There are so many established writers who are generous with their time and energy. I’m on the directory for Poetry Ireland’s Writers in the Schools and that experience is wonderful.What gets you started on a poem—idea, image, personal experience?The greatest motivation I have is being a member of the Errigal Writers. When I know we are due to meet things start moving in the back of my mind for a while. I become more aware of my surroundings and more susceptible to imagery around me. I will read more poetry in those days and watch performances on you tube. And then I try to find a silence that lets creativity come into the room. I have found my favourite type of moleskine notebooks and I always write the first drafts in longhand. I just love that moment when the first draft is finished. How did you go about getting your poetry published?You have to get work published in magazines; Poetry Ireland Review, the Stinging Fly, The SHOp were the magazines who first accepted my work. I also had pieces on Sunday Miscellany and I love recording for radio. Again I’m fortunate in that Joan and Kate Newmann of Summer Palace Press have a home in Donegal. They used to hold wonderful workshops and readings in their home in Kilcar. Eventually they accepted my manuscript and published Take a Deep Breath in 2004. They put so much work into the editing process that it is a gift when the book is published. My second book , How to Spin Without Getting Dizzy came out in 2010.You are very involved in community-based projects, how did this happen and why is it important to you?I’m not as involved as I should be but I live in Co. Donegal, we don’t have organisations running readings and workshops on an ongoing basis so the Arts Scene kind of works from the earth upwards. Our Arts Officer, Traolach O’Fionnain is very approachable and he encourages us to create events. There were times in the group energy where we needed to perform, or meet other writers, or work with established writers or publish work, so the only thing for it was to organise it ourselves. North West Words is a group who now hold readings with featured writers and open-mic on the last Thursday of every month. I do think there is a hunger for poetry readings here. Are festivals a good outlet for poets?Festivals have the funding for organising events and advertising. Anything that gets poets and writers performing in an area is good.Do female poets face particular challenges? Do young male poets seem to have a higher profile?Yes. But whether that means that female poets face more challenges I’m not sure. It is a very long road.What are you writing next?I’m writing poems for now. That is what is coming when I put the pen to paper and I’m grateful for them. Hopefully it will shape into a third manuscript.Any advice for emerging writers?Love what you are doing. Work at the craft. Read. Be prepared for the long distance not a sprint. Don’t be crucified by rejections. Look carefully at the word emerging, it carries hope and a future. It isn’t: never-going-to-happen writers, but emerging. I love the feeling that anything can happen once you are writing and sending out work.WELL-KNOWN DONEGAL POET TO READ AT IRISH WRITERS’ CENTRE was last modified: March 29th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DENISE BLAKEIRISH WRITERS’ MUSEUMlast_img read more

CWG situation sad, want Games’ success as an Indian: Advani

first_imgNDA working chairman and senior BJP leader L K Advani on Sunday criticised the shortcomings in the Commonwealth Games preparations in the last few months but said as an Indian he wished that the event would be a success.”Even in the last session of Parliament I tried not to criticise the Commonwealth Games though some of my party colleagues spoke on it. As an Indian I would want that these Games are successful,” Advani said.”Although sadly today the situation is such that there are doubts about whether the Games will be held. If they are held then that itself will be considered a big achievement,” he added.Advani was speaking at a programme organised by the International Lions Club. Earlier, he had inaugurated a cartoon exhibition, named “Wealth Cartoons” by famous cartoonist Irfan. The senior BJP leader also referred to the pun in the name of the exhibition.Advani said “6-8 months” before any event of such magnitude reports in the media mostly refer to the positive points like the work completed and the how it would be an advantage to the sportspersons of the host country.”But here the only positive reports that one hears of are that some of the countries are finally coming (to participate). This is a very sad thing,” Advani said.BJP and NDA leaders had strongly criticised Organising Committee head and Congress MP Suresh Kalmadi, Sports Minister M S Gill and the Delhi Government for the shortcomings and corruption in the CWG 2010 projects.advertisementThe principal opposition even staged a walkout in the Lok Sabha when Gill said during his presentation on the CWG debate that any information needed can be sought through an RTI application.The recent collapse of a foot overbridge at Jawaharlal Nehru stadium and other negative reports about lack of cleanliness have also drawn criticism from the opposition.last_img read more