Vermonter participates in ISO corporate responsibility conference in Brazil

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Carolyn Schmidt of Whiting is participating this month in an international conference on corporate responsibility which will take her to Salvador, Brazil. Schmidt is a member of the staff and board of directors of ECOLOGIA, a nonprofit environmental organization based in Middlebury, and an adjunct professor at Champlain College in Burlington.From March 7-11, she will meet with representatives from around the globe to create the first draft of a social responsibility standard for the ISO (International Organization of Standards).The task is to set a framework for the 21st century for how well treat people and the environment, Schmidt said. Whatever the ISO does, it will probably become the global standard.The conference will address two main categories: social responsibility of business, including the treatment of workers around the world, and environmental responsibility, including pollution and sustainable development.The ISO is accepting the concept that corporations are supported by and dependent on people and the environment, Schmidt said. Its a big step forward. I think its an exciting process to be a part of.Schmidt is the board secretary for ECOLOGIA as well as the US project manager for the organizations Virtual Foundation and project director for International Exchange Programs. She is also a member of Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility, which she describes as a tremendous resource for information.A former high school social studies teacher, Schmidt now teaches sociology and interpersonal communication courses at Champlain College. She anticipates that this international experience will provide additional real-world examples to share with her students. Sociology teaches you a different conceptual framework for assessing a situation–its a way of thinking flexibly, she said. She added that strong communications skills will be important at the conference, where she expects to employ the Vermont approach to finding a common ground. ISO is a consensus-based process, she explained.Drafting the corporate responsibility standard for ISO is expected to take three years. Teams from Sweden and Brazil are taking the lead in the project and significant efforts have been made to involve developing countries, which are home to 80 percent of the worlds population, Schmidt said.# # #last_img read more

Two NY Cats Become Country’s First Pets to Test Positive for Coronavirus

first_imgTwo domestic cats in New York have apparently become the first pets in the country to test positive for the novel coronavirus, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced Wednesday.The USDA adds that very few animals around the world have become infected. Most of those that have tested positive were in close contact with a person who has COVID-19.According to the agency’s statement, both cats had mild respiratory illness and are expected to make a full recovery. They live in separate parts of the state.Officials explain that a vet tested the first cat after it began showing mild respiratory signs. No individuals in that household were confirmed to have the virus.However, the report adds that the virus may have been transmitted to the cat by mildly ill or asymptomatic household members or by contact with an infected person outside its home.As for the second cat, the USDA says samples were also taken after it showed signs of respiratory illness. The owner of that cat had already tested positive for COVID-19 beforehand. Another cat in the same household has shown no signs of illness to date.At this time, state animal health and public health officials do not recommend routine testing of animals.“Public health officials are still learning about SARS-CoV-2, but there is no evidence that pets play a role in spreading the virus in the United States,” wrote the USDA. “Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals that may compromise their welfare. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals, including pets, could be affected.”For now, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following:-Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.-Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.-Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet from other people and animals.-Avoid dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather.In addition, USDA asks individuals who are or may be infected to restrict their contact with pets and other animals:-When possible, have another member of your household care for your pets while you are sick.-Avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food or bedding.-If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wear a cloth face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.last_img read more

Blades: “Pitar in the Santiago Bernabéu is sometimes difficult”

first_imgA good point: “The truth is that we have competed very well. With the 0-1 the field becomes very large. With the second part we have believed it and although they have put us 2 to 1 very fast we have made offensive changes and we have deserved the draw “. Great substitutions: “In Valencia we got a cross with the changes and now it was expensive. It seems that football owes us one after some hardships.”Hobby: “Almost from the hotel there were people cheering. Thank them and we have another final on Saturday.”Protests: “I claimed a bit of everything. I was losing a bit of a claw, I have four cards and I did not want to hook Carvajal. I saw the entrance and Bale has no option to play the ball, entrance from behind … Against Granada they expelled us to two players for less than this. Pitar Santiago Bernabéu is sometimes difficult. “Other assistance: “Well one more. Fedov has a lot of goal and has come to help us these six months. Now to celebrate and see if more arrive”last_img read more

If time is money, let’s value both

first_imgThis is a post from a member of the Freelancers Union community. If you’re interested in sharing your expertise, your story, or some advice you think will help a fellow freelancer out, feel free to send your blog post to us here.One of the key concepts in my field (luxury hospitality) is that affluent people are often time poor. It shows in the demand for good travel advisors, who can help them pack more into a single trip, to the growth of the “bleisure” industry.So if luxury equals time, isn’t time our most precious resource? Time poverty affects us all, in every trade, economic condition and also life stage. It has consequences from stress and anxiety, to depression, and loss of productivity. And that’s not to mention the strains on our personal life and relationships.Here are some things you can to do to manage your time-money ratio smartly:Give yourself a breakMost freelancers can relate to the time-money-happiness circle. While freelancing is perceived as a liberating choice, many of us work more hours than regular 9 to 5-ers. Why? Because we live by “If you don’t work, you don’t earn.”This attitude, especially if adopted from the get-go, can lead to burnout. While working late or on weekends is unavoidable from time to time, don’t be so flexible with clients that you forget to make time for yourself.Don’t be a yes personOn my personal freelance journey, I have learned to say no to clients and situations that don’t work for me. I try to keep my fees consistently in the medium-high range with the goal of working less, but earning the same and working on projects, and with clients, that genuinely interest me.Define your goalsOne of my resolutions (though I don’t like that word) this year is to concentrate on what really makes me happy — both professionally and personally — and finding time for it. That means keeping some flexibility in my work schedule and spending more time experiencing awe.It won’t be easy, as we’re all very much conditioned by our acquired behavior, and the “future time slack” syndrome — the belief that we will always have more time than we do now.But there’s no certainty that we will, so let’s learn to manage it better.Laura Cattaneo is an Italian translator and editor who specializes in the marketing, creative, and legal fields. Connect with her on Linkedin and Twitter, or visit her website.last_img read more