Aston Villa come away with a point at Bristol City

first_img huge blow 2 Tammy Abraham is still waiting for his first goal in Villa colours ADVICE REVEALED Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade REVEALED Latest Football News Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won silverware But Villa hit back in first-half stoppage-time when Callum O’Dowda was penalised for a needless foul and Conor Hourihane’s driven free-kick from the left was nodded powerfully home by Bjarnason from the centre of the box.A draw was a fair result to a game which saw both teams exert periods of pressure, but home fans appeared happier at the final whistle.City created the first chance when Weimann’s header from close range went wide in the fifth minute, but Villa responded quickly and Jonathan Kodjia’s shot against his old club was blocked.Tammy Abraham, also playing against his former team, had the ball in City’s net after 10 minutes, but was penalised for fouling goalkeeper Niki Maenpaa.Then came Brownhill’s goal and Matty Taylor might have made it 2-0 a minute later when his left-footed volley was directed straight at Nyland, who had hesitated coming off his line.Hourihane fired wide from distance for Villa and in the 22nd minute Abraham’s shot from 20 yards forced a diving save from Maenpaa.Kodjia, who began on the right flank, was booked for a poor challenge to the delight of home fans, who had been baiting him from the start.Hourihane was keen to try his luck from long range, but his next low effort was straight at Maenpaa. England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won The home side’s high-pressing game had caused Villa problems, but the visitors also threatened and Bjarnason’s equaliser put the outcome in the balance.Villa fans and players appealed in vain for a penalty when a 51st-minute free-kick from the left caused a scramble in front of City’s goal.But the visitors were now on top and John McGinn’s volley brought a diving save from Maenpaa.Taylor picked up a booking for a scything tackle as the game became feisty. The striker was replaced by Famara Diedhiou after 69 minutes when boss Lee Johnson also introduced Jamie Paterson for O’Dowda.City had wrestled back a measure of control and Steve Bruce responded by sending on Yannick Bolasie for Kodjia with 15 minutes remaining.Still Johnson’s men pressed and Adam Webster headed over from a corner to the near post.But Villa almost won it in the 89th minute when Hourihane’s 25-yard drive flew just wide with Maenpaa motionless.center_img Birkir Bjarnason’s first-half header saw Aston Villa earn a 1-1 Championship draw against Bristol City at Ashton Gate.The hosts took the lead on 16 minutes when Josh Brownhill’s low right-footed shot beat Orjan Nyland after former Villan Andreas Weimann’s mazy dribble was halted on the edge of the box. Lee Johnson will arguably be the happier of the two managers Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move RANKED 2 MONEY Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions BEST OF Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injurylast_img read more

For India, Achieving the Next Generation of Maternal Health Goals Requires New Approaches

first_imgPosted on March 28, 2017July 5, 2017By: Francesca Cameron, Program Assistant, the Wilson Center’s Maternal Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Achieving the next generation of maternal health goals in India, which accounts for almost 15 percent of maternal deaths around the world each year, will require innovative new approaches to stubborn problems.“We have gone through the low-hanging fruit,” said Aparajita Gogoi, national coordinator of White Ribbon Alliance India, to a room full of maternal health experts in Mumbai in February. “We have reached a saturation point and will plateau unless we address quality in a broader sense.”Gogoi addressed 45 researchers, practitioners, and advocates from across India, and a few from beyond its borders, at the new Mumbai outpost of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health as part of a two-day workshop organized by the Wilson Center and Maternal Health Task Force.In a country as sprawling and diverse as India, improving maternal health outcomes may seem like a daunting task. Yet, the country nearly achieved the ambitious Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to reduce the maternal mortality ratio by three quarters from 1990 to 2015, with a decline from 556 deaths per 100,000 live births to 174.The new target of the Sustainable Development Goals, which took over for the MDGs in 2016, is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030 and reduce national mortality rates by at least two thirds from 2010 baselines. Doing so in India, while addressing the bevy of other maternal health-related SDG targets, will require a greater focus on equity.Aggregated national data obscures steep differences across socioeconomic lines, said experts. Not to mention, the mortality ratio alone does not provide a complete picture of the state of maternal health, leaving out quality of care and morbidities, among other challenges.Unanticipated ChallengesOne notable improvement during the MDG era in India was the increase in institutional deliveries. As of 2013, 83 percent of children were delivered in institutions. Workshop participants largely attributed this to the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) and the Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) programs.Launched by the National Rural Health Mission in 2005, JSY is a conditional cash transfer program that offers financial incentives for pregnant women to use maternal health services and give birth at a medical facility. Also implemented by the National Rural Health Mission, the ASHA program trains rural women to act as liaisons between expectant mothers and the public health system, guiding them through the process and answering questions.According to workshop participants, though, too many poor women with little education – the targets of the JSY program in particular – are still being left behind. These women do not always receive payments, they said, due to administrative lags, and many are not able to travel to a health facility even if they do, thanks to poor roads and distant hospitals.Women in urban areas face different access challenges. As explored in a similar workshop convened in New Delhi by the Wilson Center, Maternal Health Task Force, United Nations Population Fund, and Population Foundation of India in 2013, India is urbanizing at a rate that is overwhelming many municipal governments. According to the minister of state for urban development, 60 percent of the population will live in cities by 2050. A dearth of quality, affordable, and accessible health services often greets women moving into informal settlement areas, exacerbating existing socioeconomic disparities and creating an “urban disadvantage.” Safety is also a major concern for urban women, who may have a theoretically short trip to the nearest clinic but must pass through dangerous areas, as well as find child care, said workshop participants.Furthermore, some women do not want to give birth in a hospital due to experiences with and perceptions of poor quality of care and disrespect. Many workshop participants expressed concern that moving from home deliveries attended by traditional birth attendants to institutional deliveries, without a proportional investment in health infrastructure and workforce training, has turned facilities into “factories.”“You want women to receive good quality care wherever they deliver,” said Dipa Nag Chowdhury, deputy director of the MacArthur Foundation’s India office. To deliver “patient-centered” maternity care that respects women’s choices, Chowdhury suggested developing more practical guidelines for care in low resource settings; developing more research proposals exploring equity issues; collecting more disaggregated data; and creating patient feedback mechanisms. Training more midwives could ensure that women who deliver at home also receive high quality care.Innovating to Put Women at the CenterThe good news is that researchers, advocates, and practitioners all over the country are rising to the challenge of designing and implementing interventions that are patient-centered and cognizant of the sociocultural determinants of health.In the west-central state of Maharashtra, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and Maharashtra University of Health Sciences are working with medical colleges to dispel myths from textbooks and improve “gender sensitization and awareness” in the curriculum.Anuja Gulati, UNFPA’s state program coordinator for Maharashtra, described textbooks filled with sexist myths such as “spinsters, childless married women, and those who have not suckled their children” are the usual sufferers of breast cancer. UNFPA created a chapter for medical textbooks that includes modern information about maternal health as well as other related issues like gender-based violence and sex-selective abortion.Other organizations are working directly with patients. The Foundation for Mother and Child Health is setting up “pregnancy clubs” run by local women. During meetings, expectant mothers share knowledge about sex, nutrition, and health services among a trusted group of people, helping to ensure that no mother is left behind.The White Ribbon Alliance has developed a tool that allows women to call a toll-free line to report on the quality of care they received during labor and delivery at a facility. The project has been piloted in Jharkhand, a state with a maternal mortality ratio of 219, and women have been eager to participate, said Gogoi. Thus far, 73,000 women have made reports.Preliminary results indicate that women measure quality of care in terms of timeliness, respectful care without abuse (maintaining comfort, privacy, and confidentiality), and cleanliness of the facility, she said. One unanticipated finding was that it’s important to many women that hospitals have food, since they may have to spend several days there. The White Ribbon Alliance used the feedback to generate a patient satisfaction dashboard that they then took to hospital managers.Changing the HeadlinesSeveral workshop participants agreed on the importance of participatory feedback and community engagement. Moving from a strictly medical approach, focused on clinical interventions, to a community health approach is necessary to close the remaining maternal health gaps across this sub-continent. In many cases moving beyond low-hanging fruit will require addressing women’s interactions with their environment, culture, religion, and social networks.Such a change requires political will, and there’s considerable work to be done on that front, said Dr. Beena Joshi from the National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health.Before recent state legislative assembly elections, many candidates prepared manifestos on health but none mentioned women’s health, primary care, or the continuum of care, she said. Meanwhile, the lead story of The Times of India on February 13 was “Space Odyssey: India Plans Trips to Venus, Mars,” reflecting a national excitement over India’s surging space program. When women are dying every day from giving life here on Earth, what do these silences say about our priorities, asked Joshi.Getting better data to government officials, empowering women as advocates, and combatting systemic sexism are the best ways to save mothers and newborns and change the headlines.Event Resources:Photo Gallery (Maternal Health Task Force)This post originally appeared on New Security Beat.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more