Andy Murray corrects reporter’s ‘sexist’ question

first_imgView comments Sir Andrew Murray is NOT amused with your casual sexism! #wimbledon pic.twitter.com/a6pTpHCFSr— Jamie (@_JamieMac_) July 12, 2017 “Male player,” says Murray.“Yes, first male player, that’s for sure,” the reporter responds, though Murray is far from amused.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LATEST STORIES China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong LeBron-invested pizza place becomes fastest growing chain in US Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim This is not Murray’s first time to interject a reporter for an oversight, and probably not his last either. In the 2016 Olympics, he corrected BBC reporter John Inverdale who congratulated him for being the first to win two gold medals in tennis.“Venus [Williams] and Serena [Williams] have won four each,” he said.My favorite genre is Murray doing this to reporters pic.twitter.com/CKs8HS0Fn7— Ashley (@ashcech) July 12, 2017While his chance of winning this year’s Wimbledon is gone, the Glasgow-born athlete is still ace in other aspects. Niña V. Guno/JBRELATED STORIES:Murray refuses to blame injury for Wimbledon heartbreakMurray at world number one — how Twitter reacted MOST READcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Mom Judy Murray approves:That’s my boy. ❤️ https://t.co/ldZUQ2wbZj— judy murray (@JudyMurray) July 12, 2017Despite the lack of recognition of their achievements, American female tennis players outperform American men in world rankings. In general, women in professional sports still receive less media coverage than their male counterparts.ADVERTISEMENT Britain’s Andy Murray celebrates after winning a point against Argentina’s Juan Martin Del Potro during their tennis match at the Roland Garros 2017 French Open on June 3, 2017 in Paris. / AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS XAVIER MARITWhen top-ranked Brit Andy Murray faced reporters after losing to American Sam Querrey in the Wimbledon quarterfinals, he still had his priorities straight.The reporter starts, “Sam is the first U.S. player to reach a major semi-final since 2009…”ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucenalast_img read more

How to Build a Community of Twitter Followers for Your Company

first_img Topics: I’ve been getting this question more and more lately, as Twitter becomes more and more mainstream and the business benefits of Twitter are more and more talked about.First, a word of caution. When engaging in any social media, you want to do so authentically – it will involve a fair amount of your participation, both give and take. Your first step once you join Twitter should probably not be to go follow 1,000 people. First of all, you very possibly might not be able to due to recent limits set by Twitter. This act seems kind of spammy, and that’s the last thing you want to do in social media. You should aim to let your community grow organically. That said, there are a few things you can do to get started.The first thing you absolutely have to do once you sign up for a Twitter account (though you can do this before signing up for Twitter, but you won’t be able to do much beyond this), is start monitoring who and what people are saying about your company. Go to Search.Twitter or Tweetscan (it may be worth it to use both, or even additional Twitter search engines, as they don’t all pick up on everything) and search for your company name, your executives’ names, perhaps your competitors’ names. You’ll see all the recent tweets that mention that name or phrase. What’s also great about these services is you can subscribe by RSS to this thread so you’ll be able to keep tabs on new posts about your company. When someone does talk about your company – respond, favorite the tweet perhaps if it’s favorable, and start following the person.A very close second most important thing to do once you’re on Twitter is to actually engage in the Twitter community. If you want people to follow you, you need to give them a reason to. Post interesting tweets, respond to others (see first point above). As noted in my word of caution, you want to be an authentic participant in the community. One of the wonderful things about Twitter is that you have to opt-in to receive someone’s updates (follow them). So, you need to think of ways to warrant a follow. I’ve been pretty impressed with Whole Foods in this regard. I started following them, though I’m no Whole Foods nut, because of their interesting tweets like “TOTD” (tweet of the day), and interesting food-related tweets like plugging food festivals across the country.Those are really the two most important things you can do on Twitter. But, if you’re still interested in ramping up your Twitter following, here are a few additional ideas:Go back to Search.Twitter and search on more general phrases that relate to the audience you’re trying to reach. Subscribe to those updates and respond/follow as appropriate.Check out the directories, like Twellow. Twellow is a directory of Twitter users categorized by industry or interest. There are a few other cool services, like Twubble and Twits Like Me. ReadWriteWeb posted a great article on these services here.Follow those who follow you. People like to feel like you’re listening to them and that they’re engaging in a two-way conversation with you. A follow-back is a great way to set that environment.Check out who your followers are following. They are likely interested in similar topics, and are a natural extenstion to your existing network.One more thought to consider before you get going: Will you be setting up a company Twitter account or will various employees have personal Twitter accounts (or both)? At HubSpot, we recently launched our company Twitter account @hubspot that a few of us monitor and update. There are also a bunch of us who have our own personal accounts, including our CEO, CSA, VP Marketing, and lots of others from across the company, including myself of course. The question is which brand you are building up – your corporate brand, or your personal brand (which in turn contributes to the company brand as well). I like the mix of both, though a lot of marketers may not have the bandwith to support more than one Twitter account. Either way, the first thing you must do after reading this post is to reserve your company’s name on Twitter before someone else does.If you want to see some companies out there who are doing a great job on Twitter, check out Zappos or Whole Foods. If you want to see a full list of companies on Twitter, check out the new Social Brand Index (and it wouldn’t hurt to get listed there, too, while you’re at it).Have you had any luck building a following for your company on Twitter? Do you have any additional techniques that worked for you? What have you learned from other companies on Twitter – good and bad approaches? Leave a comment and let’s discuss. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social Media Originally published Aug 18, 2008 9:15:00 AM, updated October 29 2019last_img read more

Twitter Handles Dos and Don’ts (and eBook!)

first_img Good Twitter Handles: Use this type of handle if you would like people to remember the industry in which you work. This way people will always associate you with your specialty, and it’s a good baseline to develop thought leadership. 2) A name followed by random numbers (Joanne123) What’s in a Name? Topics: Unless there is a reason for the specific numbers, this type of handle looks juvenile by conjuring the old AOL chat room days. Many people do it because the name they want to use is already taken. However, it gives the appearance that you aren’t putting enough thought into your username to think of something unique. —and you do not plan to make a company Twitter account—this is a great way to represent you and your company at the same time. “How to Use Twitter for Business” 3) A combination of your name and your industry (MarketingJane) , to learn more important tips for optimizing your company’s social media presence! Twitter 2) A combination of your name and your company (CompanyJane) your company on Twitter Twitter Profile Check out our ebook, We believe the first step in optimizingcenter_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack 1) Something completely random (TigerMan) This is a lost branding opportunity for you and your company and could spark confusion. It’s also unprofessional and looks like you’re hiding your identity. Bad Twitter Handles: Your 3) A handle that uses an underscore (PR_Max) Twitter for business Making your Twitter handle as close to your name as possible will make it easier for people to recognize you at a conference or event. It also treats your name like a brand. every time you tweet, you promote brand awareness for your name. handle is incredibly important. It’s true; you can change it later if you need to. But why not start best-foot-forward and be truly thoughtful when selecting the Twitter handle that will represent you or your business? Originally published Jan 12, 2009 8:54:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 starts at the very beginning: setting up your account. Joining Twitter is fun and exciting, but take the time to fully complete your account before you start using it. By ensuring everything is well set up, you will ultimately get the best results. Using an underscore won’t hurt you, but be aware that it generally is never done. Use at risk of seeming unaware of the “social norms.” 1) Your full name or a variation of your full name (JamesDean or JDean) If you will be the only person representinglast_img read more

My Dinner With Google & Madison Avenue

first_img What do you think:  (a) Is Madison Avenue going to grow over the next few years, (b) is it going to stay flat-ish, (c) is it going to shrink slightly, or (d) is it going to crater?  Vote below in the comments section. The whole business model of their industry is still centered around the “30-second (TV) spot.”  It sounds like they traditionally had made their money as a percentage of their clients spend on advertising, but that most of them had moved to a retainer type model that is closer to how law firms and consulting firms charge. while the Madison Avenue-ish firms were trying to hold onto the traditional marketing models.  transformation of marketing If you are an ad agency, a PR firm or a marketing services firm and think that the “Times Are A Changin,'” I’d encourage you to check out the marketing services transformation webinar. Last night I had a fascinating dinner hosted by the Massachusetts Interactive Technology Exchange that featured Google’s VP of Platforms, a bunch of senior executives from Madison Avenue-ish firms, a senior marketing exec from a Fortune 500 company, a marketing analyst and myself.  The conversation was really rich and enjoyable.  I felt like it ended up being HubSpot and Google arguing for the complete They were all exceptionally charismatic and convincing — Don Draper in the flesh.  I could see how these modern day Mad Men built huge businesses for themselves.  Regardless of what happens to their industry, their ability to sell will serve them well. Originally published Feb 18, 2010 9:33:00 AM, updated July 11 2013 I said that I thought the bright spot for Madison Avenue is that despite what many people say, I think creativity is more important than ever.  Back in 1970, if a 30-second spot came on the air, you basically had to watch it no matter how bad it was because you only had five crappy stations (a couple more with rabbit ear manipulation), no clicker, no cable, no DVR, no Hulu, etc.  In 2010, the content you create needs to be fantastic in order to get watched, get linked to, get shared on social media sites, etc.  I think the creativity bar today is an order of magnitude higher than it was 40 years ago.  Madison Ave has the talent to create remarkable content that will break through the clutter and this will serve them well through what I think will be a very rough decade. – Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack I was a little overshadowed on the charisma meter, but I made a couple of points that I didn’t think were half bad: I don’t know a lot of Madison Avenue bigwigs, so I learned a bunch of things that I’ll share with you below.  I’m hoping to create a dialog around what folks think the future of Madison Avenue looks like. Learn how HubSpot’s software, methodology and special programs for agencies and freelance marketing contractors can help you grow your business. There is a massive amount of consolidation going on in the industry by the big boys, but the valuations they pay are small multiples of EBITDA.  It struck me as odd that the big boys haven’t been more aggressive in buying some recurring revenue companies like Eloqua, Reachlocal, QuinStreet, etc.  One exception seems to be WPP, who has done some small investments in some really early (risky) startups — not sure why Sir Martin doesn’t swing a bit harder on getting recurring software revenue as it could give him a major competitive advantage.  These recurring revenue streams would smooth out the revenue/people lumps and dramatically improve their valuations. on our Company News Blog about our new marketing services transformation programs or download the slides from our I sat next to a great woman from one of the more forward looking Madison Ave-ish firms and part of her job was to manage her firm’s relationship with a major Fortune 100 client.  For this account alone, she had 80 people on her staff working on it.  From this conversation, I now understand why it is such a big deal when they lose a big account! It would be hard as hell to backfill those 80 people on a new account as it is really unlikely they are going to bag an elephant of that size around the same time as losing one, and it’s also going to be hard to spread 80 billable people around to other accounts in the meantime.  I suspect this type of situation must create major anxiety for managers and workers alike. @bhalligan Download the slides and audio from our webinar Download the audio and slides from our webinar where we relaunched the HubSpot partner program with significantly more benefits for marketing agencies. Webinar: Learn about the Benefits of Partnering with HubSpot I said that I thought Madison Avenue firms were going to have to dramatically change their business model.  In order to do so, they are going to have to dramatically shrink and then grow again.  My perspective is that they ought to do it willingly and proactively — rather than die by a thousand cuts like the newspaper executives are doing. Joey Parson For the most part, they all seemed to be in different states of denial about the demise of the 30-second spot.  They used clever lines like the only way the car companies are going to “move steel tonnage in volume” is by mass TV ad purchases.  Some convincing stats were spouted that sounded counter to everything I’d been reading, but they were relatively convincing.  To me, the denial feels like the newspaper industry denial 3 or 4 years ago, but I may be dead wrong about that. announcement I made today Photo Credit:last_img read more

How to Review Your Marketing Analytics in Just 10 Minutes

first_img Keyword analytics 4. Monitor Conversions Got 30 minutes? . Got 30 minutes? forms lead generation best practices will allow you to review which channels are the most effective at driving website engagement. Review a line graph of organic search, social media, email marketing, campaign-specific, direct, and total traffic over at least two weeks. Any surprising trends? Review referral traffic by individual URLs — any surprising referral pages? Are your blog posts generating traffic from quality inbound links? Take notes of the sticky content, and incorporate more of those topics into your content calendar. Got 30 minutes? Make sure to also consider seasonality if that is applicable for your business by examining year over year data. 2. Track Sources sources report Review a HUGS 2011 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack and join their Birds of a Feather roundtable discussion, “Using Analytics Tools for Business Growth.” 3. Analyze Keywords lead G Most business owners and marketing managers are too busy to dive into Got 30 minutes? keyword grader Marketing Analytics Write down goals for each traffic source and at least one step to reduce costs for each source. Also review your lead nurturing campaign(s) to jot down failed experiments or new content ideas to introduce. A The conversion rate metric allows you to gauge the efficiency of your website’s performance. All the traffic in the world won’t help your business grow if your website isn’t able to turn visitors into business leads. It is important to note that every page of your website should offer opportunities for users to convert. In your review, jot down two pages with the lowest conversion rate. Examine those pages for any missed conversion opportunities. There are many different ways to optimize your pages for lead generation. For tips, review these Take a look at the inbound links driving traffic to your website to see if there are any cross-linking opportunities to build authority for your site with search engines. Be sure to add long-tail variations of top converting keywords to further refine your niche keyword opportunities.center_img 5. Measure ROI For a deeper investigation, review traffic on a line graph against your conversion rates and sales trends. Do you regularly review your marketing analytics to check the performance of your marketing? What other metrics do you track? is a top-line metric of website engagement that measures the amount of users visiting your site. Why is reviewing traffic important? Without sustained amounts of traffic to a website, regardless of industry, businesses will have incredibly low visibility online. Use your favorite analytics platform to review trends in website traffic over two weeks or more. Do the peaks in traffic from marketing campaigns or new blog posts match what you’ve done in the past? Were there holidays or other external factors influencing the traffic? Jot down a couple of notes about potential reasons for the trending up or down when compared to weeks past. Topics: . Be sure you have a compelling “hook” for users to fill out the form as well! . LyntonWeb helps companies grow with creative inbound marketing and technology solutions. Visit them at generation every day. However, it is important to keep a pulse on how your online marketing programs are performing so you can adjust them as needed. The following is a recommendation for a 10-minute, 5-point inspection to use weekly or bi-weekly in order to keep current on your latest metrics. website analytics principles ot 30 minutes? basic Break down your ROI by traffic source. Any surprises? can be digested in many different ways. The most beneficial to your business in a quick-hit analysis is analyzing lead conversions by keyword. While traffic by keyword will show you which keywords are popular, lead conversions by keyword will show you which topics are bringing in qualified visitors. Do the keywords accurately portray your business’ products and services to drive leads? Your top converting keywords are invaluable to guide your website content, advertising buys, and even how you sell your products/services. Also look for keywords with low conversions. Usually these are opportunities to drive more leads. Add more of these keyword-focused topics to your content calendar. Review your website’s two worst converting forms against these for Traffic LyntonWeb to access your site rank on the search engines compared to competitors for popular keywords. As a best practice, always leave your analyses with takeaways and action items. Having these will encourage you to continue to reviewing your analytics regularly. Prioritize analytics for 10-minute weekly or bi-weekly reviews. Capture all your notes and high level metrics in an easy spreadsheet to keep history and share with your team. Photo credit: LIBECK 1. Check Online Traffic Originally published Sep 12, 2011 5:01:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 This is a guest blog post by Samantha Schultz, an online marketing specialist and project manager at tool Finally, tie it all back to ROI. Take the sum of what you’re spending and divide by what you are generating in returns (sales) from the website. There may be other key performance indicators marketing managers can use for an online program, however. Perhaps you’re working against cost-per-lead. Has this changed over time as you’ve grown or taken on lower cost initiatives, like search engine optimization and email marketing? Jot down two ways to reduce overall cost to the program and/or get more leads to balance out the equation.last_img read more

Fact or Fiction? The Truth Behind 9 Embarrassing Global Expansion Blunders

first_img Originally published Jul 16, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 There are many complex decisions to be made when planning your company’s expansion into new countries. No culture is alike, and each country has a language and customs unique to itself. Ergo, you would think that culture and language research would be top of the agenda for every company planning to penetrate new markets.Over the years, however, we have seen and heard some stories emerge on various websites and blogs about some brands’ lack of research in the areas of culture and language. But we could never be 100% sure if they were legit or not — some seemed too awful or hilarious to be true. So in this blog post, we thought it’d be fun to revisit those alleged blunders, and try to get to the bottom of the legends. Let’s play a little game of True or False, shall we?1) CoorsThe Story: This rocky mountain ice cold beer company decided to cool down their Spanish market. However, the translator for Coors must have been product testing that day and their slogan “Turn It Loose,” when translated, became “Suffer From Diarrhea.” Not really something I would elect to do on a Friday evening after work. True or False? FALSE.There are reports that Coors used the phrase suéltalo con Coors which translates, literally, to “let it go loose with Coors”; there are other reports that they used the phrase suéltate con Coors, which literally translates to “set yourself free with Coors.” However, according to David Wilton, author of Word Myths: Debunking Linguistic Urban Legends, Coors never actually ran an ad campaign featuring any of these slogans.2) Dairy AssociationThe Story: When expanding into Mexico, the Dairy Association’s hugely successful “Got Milk” campaign was not so well received. Translated, the slogan became “Are You Lactating?” I have a feeling that slogan didn’t resonate with as wide of an audience as the Dairy Association was hoping. True or False?FALSE.According to Jeff Manning, executive director of the California Milk Processor Board, this was discovered and resolved in the market research phase. Phew.3) ElectroluxThe Story: Getting a country’s official language correct is one thing, but don’t forget to research the colloquialisms of the culture, as well. Take this Scandinavian vacuum company as an example. They thought their slogan, “Nothing Sucks Like an Electrolux,” was very clever given the powerful suction of their Electrolux vacuum cleaner. However, when they launched in America, it wasn’t quite clear whether Electrolux was being promoted — or in fact dissed — by a competitor. True or False?TRUE.According to Wikipedia, in the 1960s Electrolux successfully marketed vacuums in the United Kingdom with this slogan. It was later used in the United States, but the informal U.S. meaning of the word was actually already known in the UK. So, this was a bit of a marketing gamble, in hopes the edgy slogan would help them gain some attention in their international expansion. 4) PepsiThe Story: Here’s a good Halloween marketing campaign from Pepsi — only it wasn’t a Halloween campaign, and was very offensive to the Chinese market they were trying to crack. Instead of promoting their famous slogan “Come alive with Pepsi generation,” they marketed themselves by accidently saying “Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the dead.” Pepsi packs a powerful punch, but probably not that powerful. True or False?UNCONFIRMED.Pepsi has neither confirmed nor denied this claim. Let’s move on to their competitor, then …5) Coca-ColaThe Story: One of the most famous blunders comes from the most widely known brand name in the world. When Coca-Cola was entering the Chinese market, the drink was pronounced “Ke-kou-ke-la” which, depending on dialect, meant “bite the wax tadpole” or “female horse stuffed with wax.” True or False?FALSE.According to myth-debunking-site Snopes.com, store owners making their own signs made the blunder because they used their own dialect and characters, which in other regions translated to bite the wax tadpole, etc. Coke actually researched 40,000 Chinese characters and found a close phonetic equivalent, “ko-kou-ko-le,” which can be loosely translated as “happiness in the mouth.” 6) ClairolThe Story: The German market was in for quite a shock when hair care company Clairol arrived on the scene with their “Mist Stick” curling iron. Why? “Mist” in German translates as “Manure.” Yikes. I know they say mud is good for the skin but I’m not sure anyone could sell manure for the hair. True or False?FALSE.It looks like this story has been mixed up with that of a Rolls Royce Silver Mist story. Clairol, you’re off the hook!7) Parker PensThe Story: Parker Pens had a fun time explaining themselves after bringing their product to Spain … and promptly ensuring people it wouldn’t get them pregnant. Their slogan (which leaves a lot to be desired in the first place) went from “It won’t leak in your pocket and embarrass you” to “It won’t leak in your pocket and make you pregnant.” I should certainly hope not. True or False?TRUE.Or at least according to the examples in the book Brand Failures.8) Powergen ItaliaThe Story: Even something as simple as a website address can go horribly wrong. Take Powergen Italia, for example. They’re an Italian company who was expanding into English-speaking countries, and decided to go with the most obvious website address — without thinking about how it would read for their English-speaking customers. Visit www.powergenitalia.com to learn more. Just kidding. They nixed that URL pretty promptly. True or False?TRUE.This is true according to several sources, including Ananova, although it’s important to understand that this blunder didn’t come from the Italian division of energy giant Powergen, but the marketing folks at Powergen Italia, an Italian maker of battery chargers. The website now switches you over to the more aptly named for English-speakers, www.batterychargerpowergen.it.9) GerberThe Story: Everybody knows the cute little Gerber baby that features on the front of all of their baby food products — so sweet! However, when they entered the African market they failed to research product packaging norms. Had they done that, they would have discovered that products mostly feature images of the contents inside the packaging. Therefore, a jar with a cute little baby on the front didn’t do so well. True or False?FALSE.According to Snopes.com, this is an urban legend — which was both surprising and frightening to some HubSpotters that had heard this story when they were taking university-level PR classes. Yikes.How some of these blunders got past the execs at these companies is unclear, but clearly it is possible to make catastrophic mistakes, even if you’re a global leader like many of these brands. Allow yourself some time to properly roll out your global expansion plans, pulling in cultural and language experts along the way.For more tips on setting yourself up for success, download the Marketer’s Guide to European Expansion. Although we can’t help with translation, we do cover essential topics like how to decide which markets will be a good fit, how to achieve a multilingual website, and SEO tips from expert Aleyda Solis.Image credits: Sarebear:), lonelycamera, Blixt A., eblaser, tcwmatt, Omer Wazir, Tavallai, AnxiousNut, thejbird Marketing Case Studies Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more

5 Ways to Extend the Lifespan of a Tweet

first_img Originally published Nov 25, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Twitter Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: What’s the difference between a healthy tweet and a sick tweet? Simply put: Healthy tweets live longer. How long, you ask? Well, the jury’s still out on that. Some reports say 48 hours, while others say 18 minutes. Either way, we marketers are always striving for those healthy tweets — ones that reach out to our followers and get them engaged with our brand.But with 9,100 tweets scrolling by every second, we have to do everything we can to get our tweets noticed. There’s a lot of outside factors that influence the lifespan of a tweet — numbers of followers, time of day you’re tweeting, etc. — but to make sure your tweets are as impactful as possible, you have to have a game plan.So, here are five strategies you can employ on Twitter to give your tweets the best chance to be healthy and get noticed by your followers. 1) Optimize your tweets for retweets.One of the best things about marketing on Twitter is that it gives you a built-in mechanism for extending the lifespan of your tweet: the retweet.When someone retweets your tweet, it means they found the content valuable enough to share with their own followers, thus extending the lifetime of your tweet. It’s a great way to pass along content to your followers that you didn’t create yourself or to show support to a fellow business or colleague.Get started by: Checking out the free tool RetweetLab.com. Powered by HubSpot, the tool allows you to analyze any Twitter account to get the data you need to make sure your tweets are retweetable. The tool was created by Dan Zarrella, who wrote The Science of Retweets and has spent years analyzing data to bring us best practices for social media marketing. (One quick tip: Always cap your tweets at around 115 characters for optimal retweet-ability.)2) Schedule your tweets in advance.Twitter is a great platform for on-the-fly updates, but when you’re using Twitter as part of your overall social media strategy, you’ll want to schedule tweets in advance that complement other aspects of your marketing. This will help keep your tweets healthy because you’ll have time to optimize them.That’s not to say you can’t post Twitter updates while at a big conference or event. But what if you’re the sole social media marketer for your company and you’re at the event? It’s good to have a few tweets cued up for backup that still support your other marketing efforts.Get started by: Setting aside 10 minutes a week to schedule tweets in advance. Friday might even be the best day to do this, so you know when you get in to work on Monday, you have your social media content all planned out for the week. This leaves you room to practice newsjacking for anything that’s relevant to your industry or capitalize on a marketing campaign that’s doing really well by adding in a few extra tweets mid-week.(HubSpot customers: We just made a fantastic planning spreadsheet so you can bulk upload tweets with ease.)3) Include a link in all of your organic tweets.Unless you’ve got a Twitter update that shakes the entire world, adding a link to your tweets is great way to keep it healthy. It brings even more content to your tweet while staying within the confines of Twitter’s character limits. It also gives people something valuable to pass on to their followers beyond your commentary on the link. Providing valuable information to your followers is the best way to get noticed.Get started by: Taking a link and coming up with multiple ways to promote it. We recently posted this article and suggest promoting one link in five different ways by using the title of the page, a quote, one takeaway you discovered, one statistic, and a sentence of commentary. Not a bad exercise to do, especially when tweets with links are 86% more likely to be retweeted.4) Get more Twitter followers.There’s no magic number when it comes to Twitter followers. But the more followers you have, the more likely it is that someone will see your update and engage with you. For example, if Justin Bieber were to retweet you, it’s possible your tweets would be seen by millions (maybe even tens of millions). But unless you’re a megastar, you’ll have to settle for getting followers the old-fashioned way.Get started by: Engaging with others in your industry on Twitter. You can search Twitter for relevant hashtags, or industry terms, to help you find other people or companies that are like you. You can even create lists of these folks so you can easily monitor their Twitter updates and see who else they’re engaging with. Connect with them by retweeting them or asking them questions about content they’ve shared. But don’t resort to getting new followers by tricks or bots — that’s just not proper social media etiquette.5) Use a hashtag in your tweets.Hashtags are commonly used in tweets to give those scanning through some quick context about the subject of the update. You may not say the word “social media” in your update, but adding #socialmedia to your tweet will catch the eyes of those interested in the subject. Also, hashtags are a great way to search for tweets – so your tweets should be optimized for search as well.Get started by: Having a handy list of 7-10 hashtags that you can always use in your tweets. Setting up the list early takes the guesswork out when your tweeting on the go or scheduling tweets for the week. You should use these hashtags when sharing your own organic content and especially when you’re curating content to make it easy for your followers to understand the relevance of your retweet.Along with these five strategies to keep your tweet healthy, don’t forget to make sure you’ve put some thought into the copy, too. Crafting your update to include an attention-grabbing title, or colorful commentary, will go a long way in making sure your tweets get noticed by your followers. Be interesting, be authentic, and most importantly, keep the “social” in social media by being human.What other strategies do you have for making sure your tweets last as long as possible? Let us know in the comments!last_img read more

How to Lose Money on Your Ecommerce Site This Holiday Season

first_img Originally published Dec 20, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 This post originally appeared on Inbound Ecommerce, a new section of Inbound Hub. Subscribe here to read more content like this from Inbound Ecommerce.With your marketing dollars driving traffic to your ecommerce site this holiday season, you may think you can sit back and watch all the new customers roll in.Early estimates suggest $82 billion will be spent this year for online purchases alone. With so much money funneling toward ecommerce, losing money seems impossible. If, however, you’re determined to experience a loss this season, here’s how to do it.Guaranteed Ways To Lose MoneyForget PersonalizationPour money into a website that doesn’t capture customer information through cookies or registration forms. If your only goal is to get customers to your site for the holiday season, there’s no reason to follow up with them anyway, right? Who cares about personalization when those customers will only see your site once?Everyone who’s going to buy is going to buy on their first visit, so there’s no need to make the experience grow more valuable over time.On With the SpamCreate broad, follow-up email messages to send to any customers who managed to leave their email addresses.Without capturing any information on your site, you won’t know what your customers purchased anyway, so how could you possibly segment the emails and send out targeted messages … right?More Customers, Less SatisfactionPut plenty of money into PPC ads but never mind about retargeted ads. If you’re only worried about getting people to your site the first time (and 73% of ecommerce conversions come from first-time visitors, so you can bet you’re not alone), a retargeted ad won’t be much help. Don’t Dare to Be DifferentFocus more on driving customers to your page than on providing your unique value proposition.There may be plenty of competitors out there selling the same thing you’re selling, but you don’t need to convince buyers that your company is better at service and quality, as long as you’ve got more visitors coming along later.Give It AwayPay no attention to the cost of your offers. By giving free shipping for every customer who makes a purchase, you’ll sell more than any of your competitors.Buyers are more likely to abandon a shopping cart if the price of shipping is too high, so you should simply eliminate shipping costs for customers altogether, regardless of how much you’ll pay in the end.Set Them FreeIf a potential customer abandons their shopping cart, just let them go. If they come back to you, it was meant to be. At least, that’s how over 80% of the top 1,000 companies feel. If this mentality is good enough for them, it’s good enough for you, too.Contact Forms Protect Your PrivacyDon’t worry about providing contact information on your website. If people want to get in touch with you, they can just fill out another contact form. After all, if they’re trying to get in touch with you, it probably means they have a complaint, and complaints often mean returns and refunds.With this plan in place, you’ll be well on your way to logging a 9% loss. Never mind the fact that 99% of first-time visitors don’t plan to buy anything anyway. Those who do make a purchase cost you so much money just getting them there that you have no way to recover the loss.The above was all written with tongue firmly in cheek — but that doesn’t mean it’s untrue. By focusing all your attention on traffic and first-time sales, you could actually lose money.Without customer retention, it’s easy to see how you could lose money this holiday season — even with $82 billion spent for online purchases. So what can you do to see revenue growth?Now Let’s Make MoneyThe key to turning a profit with your ecommerce site is customer retention. Getting that first sale is great, but you want to develop and foster a great customer relationship.As you can see from the chart below, repeat customers average higher orders and cost nothing for acquisition. You do, however, need to focus your attention on a few things to make sure those customers want to return for future purchases.Keep Your PromisesWhen convincing those buyers to make their purchases from your ecommerce site, you likely made plenty of promises. You better deliver a quality product as quickly as you can, without any hidden fees or tricks. Be Available Whether it’s by email, social media, instant chat, or phone, make yourself available to all customers. Your customer service at this time is more important than any of the tactics you used to get those customers to your site in the first place.Give Buyers a VoiceReach out after the sale to ask for reviews. Those reviews can help in more ways than one. You give your buyers a voice when you allow them to share their experiences on your site, which makes them feel important. They will appreciate that chance to tell others about their experience.You’ll also have that social proof that first-time visitors look for when visiting your site. As an added bonus, reviews and testimonials help your SEO by directing buyers to your site for information instead of a third-party site.Go After Abandoned CartsYou don’t have to be like 80% of the companies out there. If you send out those emails, 72% of those who return to make a purchase will do so within the first 12 hours. Within two weeks, 100% of those who return with the intention of making a purchase will do so. That means you still have time to recover those buyers before the big day.Be RelevantYour email campaigns should include only relevant material. Show your first-time customers that you’ll be responsible with the information they shared when making their purchase.Segmentation of your contact lists is the only way to make sure buyers are getting emails that appeal to them instead of broad topics that will be counted as spam.Show ThanksMost of all, thank your buyers for the sale. You may be surprised at how far genuine appreciation can go.Why is all this customer service so important? Because repeat customers are the only way you’ll make money off this holiday season. We all want to see big numbers for holiday spending this season, but if you’re not recovering your investment into customer acquisition, those numbers will mean nothing for your company’s success.What are your thoughts on these tips to capitalize this holiday season? Got any tips of your own? Share ’em in the comments below! Ecommerce Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! 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7 Types of Push Notifications Users Actually Enjoy

first_imgIf recent marketing news has made one thing clear, it’s this: Mobile is non-negotiable.A growing number of us are using mobile as our primary device for accessing the internet — over a quarter of us interact with our smartphones more than any other object, or human being, for that matter. And content, in kind, has to fit that format, whether we’re consuming it or discovering it for the first time.Brands are starting to respond to that. Just last week, for instance, Google announced that non-mobile friendly pages will be ranking even lower next year.Apps will be especially impacted most by this increasingly widespread mobile use. The push notifications we receive on our devices will play a vital role in the information we come across, and if we choose to consume it.Many of us are already receiving information that way. In 2015, the average opt-in rate for push notifications was 49.8%. But those messages have to be optimized — otherwise, brands risk being ignored or forgotten.Why is that, exactly, and how can it be avoided? Read on to discover the types of push notifications your users actually want to receive — and how each one will benefit both of you.Master the fundamentals of mobile marketing using this free guide.7 Types of Push Notifications Your Users Actually Want1) The ones that are encouraging — not shaming.Once upon a time, I had an activity-tracking bracelet. It was connected by Bluetooth to my phone, where I could use an app to log workouts and meals.One day, when I hadn’t worked out for a while as a result of having the flu, I received a push notification from the app.“You haven’t been your active self lately,” it said. “Log a workout now.”I can’t be the only one who would feel a little bit judged by a message like that, even if it was automated. I mean, was this app serious? I had the flu! No wonder health and fitness app have the lowest opt-in rate for push notifications — they shame their users.That doesn’t have to be the case — nor is it, for every health and fitness app out there. There are some, like 12 Minute Athlete, that let users schedule their own workout reminders. (And if you’re sick, you don’t have to schedule any.) Then, when it does come time for your workout, you get a notification that encourages you, instead of making you feel guilty.Source: 12 Minute AthleteMost health and fitness apps are traditionally created with a somewhat shared goal: To help their users get better at doing something. And one of the most ineffective ways of doing that? Feeling bad about not doing it. In fact, research has shown that it’s self-compassion and forgiveness that make us correct negative behaviors — not guilt.Consider giving your users the option of taking a break. That can be applied to a variety of app categories: Health and fitness, dating, or online shopping. Let them determine how long they want that hiatus to be — and feel free you set your own parameters for how long that can actually go on. Then, send a push notification to ask them if they’re ready to come back. That will remind them to launch the app, keeping them engaged after they’ve stepped away.2) The ones that make life a little easier.I’m one of those people who has to put everything in my calendar. But the one thing I never seem to remember scheduling is an online check-in for my flights.That’s why I absolutely love it when airline apps remind me to check in 24 hours in advance — and maybe that’s one reason why travel and transportation apps have the highest push notification opt-in rate.Many airlines notify passengers to check in via email, but let’s face it — with text messages outweighing email as the preferred method of communication by 23%, chances are that we’re looking at these quick notifications more than we’re checking our email.JetBlue is one airline that does this particularly well. Like clockwork, I always receive a friendly little note on my screen — “Hey there. It’s time to check in for your flight” — exactly 24 hours before I’m scheduled to take off. It’s one less thing that I have to remember to do and, therefore, these particular notifications are adding value for me.Ask yourself that question before you write copy for a push notification: How can we frame this in a way that creates value for the user? You’ll be glad you did — users who opt-in to push messages average three times more app launches than those who opt out.3) The ones that know where its users are — in a non-creepy way.When Localytics asked mobile users which type of push notifications they preferred the most, 34% responded with “a special offer based on my location” — the third most popular kind.And why not? If you’re already out, you might as well treat yourself with that special discount, right?Take this notification from Neoshop. It’s personalized on two levels — it includes the user’s first name, and it lets him know that there’s a shop location nearby where he can use some of the credits he’s accumulated.Source: Business 2 CommunityKnowing where your users are and responding in kind accomplishes two things: First, it lets them know that you’re paying attention. You’re not watching them in a Big-Brother-ish way — you’re looking out for them, and for opportunities around them.Second, offering them something special based on that information can make your brand relatable — like a friend texting to say, “I’m in your neighborhood. Wanna get coffee?”That’s another way to add value for your user. Instead of asking them to go out of their way to engage with you, you’re creating an opportunity when it’s convenient to them. That makes it easy for someone to find a reason to launch your app — and to remember that they have unused rewards.4) The ones that get people excited about something.There are also occasions when you might not be where you want to be — like a warm beach in the middle of winter, for example. And, there are times when a push notification can help you get there — like with a cheap airfare alert.Kayak, a travel search site, allows its users to set their own notification criteria — based on destination, date, or popular places to travel — and receive an alert when the price for any of those trips drops below a point of their choosing.Source: ArkeneaThere are few things that thrill me more than a good deal on airfare. And when it’s Kayak who lets me know about that deal, I associate that brand with my excitement.And that makes sense — “a special offer based on my preferences” was the #1 preferred type of push notification in 2015. The reward is twofold: Not only are your users receiving information that’s perceived as a great deal, but it’s the result of something they were able to dictate. There’s a return on their investment in your app — and they got to call the shots on what that return would look like.There are several verticals that could stand to benefit from this strategy. It’s the positive association I mentioned before that really stands out — just as it is with location-based alerts, these notifications send the message that your brand is looking out for its users. It’s as if the app is saying, “I know you mentioned that you were looking for one of these, so I picked it up for you.”It’s thoughtful, right? And since 52% of us prefer gifts that are truly considerate in that way, it seems fitting that we would respond well to brands that behave accordingly.So think about what’s really going to excite your users. Let your audience determine what they deem rewarding by letting them customize preferences. When you plan your push notifications, having that information will help craft the message that your app is going out of its way to benefit its users.  5) The ones that alert people to what matters to them.It might seem like we’re a bit overwhelmed with bad news these days — so much, in fact, that WNYC put together a Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook. As much as we like to stay informed, we also like the opportunity to tune some things out.But what about the rest of what’s happening in the world — the stuff that we want to stay in the loop for? At risk of sounding cliché: There’s an app for that.The Oregon Public Broadcasting app set a great example for how push notifications can be used for this kind of content distribution and promotion. “We’re not singularly a breaking news app,” said OPB’s Marketing Director, Paul Loofburrow, “but if there’s a public service announcement, we want to share that.”Instead, the app uses push notifications to alert listeners to live broadcasts, encouraging them to tune in. And it works — after sending these alerts, OPB saw a 483% increase in users listening to a specific radio broadcast.Source: Urban AirshipMedium, an online publishing platform, uses push notifications in a similar way. Users can receive an instant alert when someone they follow publishes a new post — and can decide if they want to Medium to select the top five posts of this kind, instead of receiving a notification every time something new is published. And if they want, users can also opt to receive notifications for stories that Medium recommends, based on their reading history.  Mobile Apps Topics: Originally published Sep 5, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated October 29 2019center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Breaking News is another app that has quite a few content customization features. It lets users decide what they want brought to their attention, and when they want to hear about it. There’s an option to disable notifications for “major stories,” as well as a way to set “quiet time,” when no news alerts will be sent.Source: Breaking NewsBut here’s where the real value comes in — the features that allow users to pick the topics they want to know about.Source: Breaking NewsThat level of personalization is a tremendous asset to your audience. In fact, users are three times more likely to respond to a notification that directly affects them, as opposed to an alert that might have been sent to everybody.Depending on what sort of information is shared by your app, a best practice could be to let users pick and choose what they want to know about. And, instead of only giving them the chance to turn off notifications completely, let them choose a time of day when they don’t want to be disturbed.6) The ones that help people pick up where they left off.You’ve walked into a room with an intention. But then, something distracts you. The phone rings, someone’s shouting your name for your attention, and by the time that distraction has passed, you’ve forgotten why you walked into that room in the first place.That scenario often plays out when we’re using apps. Let’s say I’m using a grocery delivery app to place an order, when someone sends me a text message. If leave the app to respond, I’m probably going to forget what I was doing before that message came in, and neglect to finish my order. That’s no surprise, since studies now reveal that we have a shorter attention span than most goldfish — largely due to smartphone use.But Instacart is one app that helps me remember to finish a task. If I abandon my shopping cart without checking out, for example, it sends me this friendly reminder:How convenient! Not only do I now remember that I need to order my groceries, but I don’t have to wait that long for them to be delivered, either.This example goes back to the idea of making life easier for your users. But in this case, instead of being reminded of a specific, salient event — like a trip or flight somewhere — the app is helping me stay on top of my day-to-day tasks and responsibilities.When you design your push notifications, keep two things in mind:How busy are your users?Is this alert going to help them, or just distract and disrupt them?Answering those questions will help you prioritize the alerts you want to send to your users, and limit the amount of overload they perceive from your app.7) The ones that keep people posted.Perhaps you’ve heard about the “hangry” phenomenon — an adjective that Dictionary.com defines as “irritable as a result of feeling hungry.”When you combine the cultural pervasiveness of hangriness with the fact that more and more of us are ordering meals online (by 2020, it’s predicted that mobile ordering will be a $38 billion industry), the outcome is as follows: We really, really want to know when our food will arrive.That’s why it’s smart for what Business Insider calls “aggregators” — platforms like GrubHub and Eat24 that allow users to order online from dozens of different outlets — to incorporate a live delivery update feature, to let us know when our food is on its way.Source: LocalyticsSource: AllThingsDIt’s important to note that we’re becoming a species of instant gratification — 43% of us think it’s unacceptable to take more than 10 minutes to respond to a text message, for example. And whether we like that direction or not, it’s important for businesses to adapt, especially in the mobile sector.If your app requires your users to wait for something, ask yourself:Am I making my users wait longer than they want or should have to?Am I keeping my users posted about what they’re waiting for?Am I updating my users to the point that I’m becoming disruptive?Do my users have a way to reach me if they need more information after I update them?Those last two points stress the importance of striking the right balance with push notifications. Share just enough information so that your users aren’t left completely in the dark while they’re waiting. And if they need more details, make sure there’s an easy way for them to get in touch with you.Ready to start notifying?There are a few tools out there that can help you create and implement push notifications. A few of our favorites:Aimtell: Aimtell is a push notification platform for re-engaging desktop and mobile visitors with hyper-targeted notifications. It allows users to send tailored notifications to website visitors with highly personalized content.Amazon Web Services: Among Amazon’s many developer tools is its SNS Mobile Push Notifications feature. Like other platforms of its kind, this feature allows notifications to be sent individually (to one person at a time), or to multiple users at once.OneSignal: OneSignal is a notification service that’s used by several apps that need to provide real-time updates to their users — think Uber (“where’s my ride?”). It also allows A/B testing, so that marketers can send two different messages to samples of user groups and see which one performs better.When it comes to creating push notifications, there’s an unspoken golden rule: Alert others as you would like to be alerted.These notifications are absolutely crucial to your mobile marketing strategy — users that enable them are 171% more engaged with the app than those who don’t. But choose them wisely.When in doubt, we find it’s helpful to use a checklist. So make sure your push notifications meet these basic criteria:They aren’t redundant or disruptive to your users.They keep your users informed of the things they want to know.They’re thoughtful — they keep an eye out and make life a little more convenient for users, without seeming overbearing or clingy.They encourage users — and don’t shame them.How do you use push notifications? Share it with us in the comments.last_img read more

The Ultimate Guide to Creating Shareable Infographics Using PowerPoint or Keynote

first_img Infographics Don’t forget to share this post! Now I realize that I might upset some people when I say this, but too bad: Data is not a requirement of a viral infographic. Of course, data makes it incredibly easy to prove your point by using indisputable numbers — but I’ve also seen dozens of infographics go viral that don’t include a single graph or piece of data.That being said, when you choose to include data in your infographic, there are some important things to consider.The traditional way would be to use charts and graphs:The second way to display your data is to use “data visualization”:For example, you could use a set of 10 “smartphone” icons where seven are colored and three are greyed out to represent the fact that 70% of Americans own a smartphone.Or you could use a unique illustration like a ship race to visualize your data.Just remember: Regardless of what type of infographic you’re creating, make sure that you’re using highly-engaging visuals and data visualizations to bring your content and data to life.Action items for Step #5:Summarize and add in your copy.Add strong supporting visuals to “show” not “tell.”Use charts and visualizations to bring data to life.Step #6: Export, optimize, and upload.Once you’re happy with your infographic, it’s time to get it ready for the web. The first thing you need to do is export the “presentation deck” that you’re working on to a PDF.In PowerPoint, just click on “File” then “Export” from your menu bar.In Keynote, you do the same thing, except you choose “PDF…” from the menu bar.Now that you have a PDF version of your infographic, you need to optimize the file size for fast loading online, without sacrificing quality or readability. Like I mentioned in step #2, there’s a good chance your infographic won’t fit perfectly into the resized PowerPoint or Keynote deck, so here’s a simple solution:Open a photo editing tool (it doesn’t have to be PhotoShop) then crop and/or stitch together your PDF(s) to get the perfect height.Next, resize your infographic to be between 700 and 900 pixels wide. Again, this will preserve the quality of the image while making the file’s size as small as possible.Also, I recommend using a tool like Optimizilla to compress and optimize your infographic even further. Try to get the final file size to be less than 5 MB — and be sure to save the photo file as a PNG or JPG.The next thing you need to do is create a home for your infographic on your website. To do this, create a new page or blog post with a unique URL that you’ll upload and add the infographic image to.This is important because when the infographic is shared around the internet, you want to make sure all the links point back to you so you get more traffic and shares.Action items for Step #6:Export infographic to a PDF.Crop and/or “stitch” together your PDF(s).Resize to 700-900 pixels wide.Upload to a new website page or blog post.Step #7: Go viral with strategic promotion.Real talk: Infographics don’t go viral by accident — even if you’ve got the best infographic in the world.Instead, strategically promoting your infographic by identifying the right people and the right websites can get your infographic in front of thousands of people fast.But before we do that, you’ll want to make sure to optimize your infographic for search engines. SEO won’t necessarily help your infographic go viral, but it’s extremely beneficial because it will help increase your search engine rankings (which means more free traffic to your website).Check out this infographic by Backlinko to help guide you while you’re optimizing your infographic(s) for search engines:After that’s done, here are the next three things you should do:#1: Find websites and blogs that share similar infographics.For example, if I had just published an infographic on email marketing, I would go to Google at type in: “Email marketing infographic.” What you’re looking for are websites and blogs that have published similar infographics made by other people.After you’ve got a decent list of websites who you think will be willing to share your infographic, it’s time for some email outreach. First, start by identifying the authors from each of the websites who published similar infographics. You can usually find the author’s name in the article’s byline:Once you’ve got a list of authors, use a tool like Viola Norbert or ContentMarketer.io to find email addresses so you can start sending personal emails.If you want to learn how the pros do email outreach, check out this article my friend Emil Shour did with Brian Dean at Backlinko. Part of that case study highlights the “Pre-Outreach” and “Content Roadshow” strategies he used to generate buzz for his content.For example, check out Emil’s 2-step approach to email outreach. Instead of doing what most people do and asking for a backlink or share right away (1-step approach) here’s what he did:And because he wasn’t being pushy, he get’s responses like this from people asking to send his content over (2-step approach):See the difference?Now I’ll be the first to admit that email outreach is not the most exciting part about infographic marketing — but it’s crucial if you want to get more eyeballs on your work.Plus, the long-term benefits from the relationships you’ll build with influencers and bloggers will become invaluable down the road.#2: Identify influencers who share similar infographics.The best tool to find these influencers is BuzzSumo. Just type in a topic or copy/paste a specific link to pull up content that is sorted by number of social media shares.For example, if I were doing an infographic on gardening, I’d type in “gardening infographic” into BuzzSumo. Next, I would go through the results one by one and click “View Sharers” on any infographics that are similar to mine:This will give you a list of the people who have shared that infographic, which is helpful because you can sort by number of followers to identify influencers with a large number of followers who have shared infographics that are similar to yours.Like in the last step, find their email address and start reaching out one-by-one. Aside from Viola Norbert and ContentMarketer.io, another clever way to find someone’s email address is to subscribe to their blog — the welcome email and all future emails should come from an address that you can respond to.As an alternative, if you can’t find someone’s email address, you can always use Twitter to reach out publically:Sam Hurley has hundreds of thousands of followers but still responded and shared my content:See how I used the same 2-step outreach approach like the email example from above?Ask if they want to see it.If they say yes, send the link.Not being pushy is the key to getting responses and getting your content shared. You might also consider sending a friendly “thank you” note after an influencer shares your content to strengthen the relationship:#3: Submit your infographic to infographic directories.These directories are basically websites that curate infographics for other people to see. And they are the perfect place to get your infographic discovered by people who might want to share it on their website.Trouble is, there are dozens of these directories out there, so instead of manually doing each one by yourself I recommend using Fivver to pay someone to do it for you. You don’t need to have someone submit your content to 50+ directories — just stick with the people who only add it to the top 10-30 infographic directories.Once you’ve added you infographic to the right directories, share it through all of your marketing channels:Share with your email listsSchedule multiple social media postsPaid ads / remarketing adsAdd links to infographic on relevant website pagesShare with industry partnersSend to influencers/bloggers who’ve shared your content in the pastShare with any brand or person you mentioned in your contentAction items for Step #7:Optimize your infographic for search engines.Share infographic with the right bloggers and influencers.Promote through all your digital marketing channels.Wrapping UpAlright, so I know this was a long one … but be sure to bookmark this article so you can come back and refer to it at any time during the infographic creation and promotion process.Need more help? I’ve put together a few bonuses to guide you along — including a 20-step infographic checklist (we only covered seven here), as well as a handy teardown video. Click here to grab those.What other infographic creation questions do you have? Share them in the comments below. If you’re still having an issue creating your layouts, add some wireframes to a blank presentation deck and use the “Shapes” tool to trace layouts until you get the hang of it. Last note: If you’re using Keynote, once you’re happy with your wireframe, I recommend that you “Lock” the shapes in place, that way when you’re adding in content later, you don’t accidentally screw up the layout. (You’ve been warned!)Action items for Step #3:Find layout inspiration on Pinterest.Use the “Shapes” tool to create your wireframe.Create infographic sub-sections using shapes.Step #4: Choose a color and typography palette.Now with your snazzy new wireframe, you’re ready to choose colors and fonts.Let’s talk colors first: A color palette is one of the most subtle, yet crucial aspects of any creative project. Your color palette will set the tone for your infographic and tie visual elements together.When designing an infographic, I like to choose two different color sets. The first color set is the background(s), where I typically use soft, subtle colors so I can draw attention to important elements with brighter colors.Here are a few examples:Of course the flip side of that is to use bold background colors. But even with white text, it can make the graphic difficult to read. The second set of colors you choose will serve as your primary palette. These can be brighter and more eye-catching –“flat” colors are very popular for infographics.Here are a few examples:Keep in mind that it’s a smart idea to choose a palette that compliments your brand’s style. You can use a tool like Adobe Color to build a pallet around any color you’d like.If you don’t want to build your own palette, I recommend that you check out Colour Lovers for endless inspiration created by other people:Make sure that you’re not choosing too many colors as that can create “disconnect” between important areas of your infographic and overwhelm readers. If all else fails, using different shades of same color is always a safe bet.Once you’ve got a nice color palette, it’s time to choose a font combination. The first thing you should do is avoid fancy or intricate fonts. (Even if it compliments your brand.)Why? After you resize the infographic to a “web-friendly” size, those types of text can be extremely difficult to read. Instead, stick with easy-to-read fonts like Arial, Open Sans, Courier and Verdana.When choosing a typography combination, you can combine two fonts, or use variations of the same font.Check out the two examples below:Make sure that you’re not using any fonts below 16 pts as it becomes extremely difficult to read once you resize your infographic in step #6. There is one exception when it comes to the fonts however: You don’t have to match your header’s title with the rest of your typography — you can take a bit more creative liberty with that area of the infographic.For example, check out these great headers that grab your attention immediately with eye-catching typography:Want some incredible fonts for your title, sub-headers, and body text that you can download and use for free? Check out this article.Action items for Step #4:Choose a background color scheme.Choose a primary color scheme.Select an easy-to-read typography combo.Step #5: Add in your content, charts, and visuals.Now it’s time to take all the resources you collected in step #1 and extract the most focused, actionable content for your infographic.Start by adding in your sub-headers and body text to the wireframe you created in step #3:Make sure that your copy is short and to-the-point like the example above. You’ll also need to include links to every resource you cited at the bottom of the infographic:Now, it’s time to bring your words to life. To do this, use strong visual elements that instantly get your point across by “showing” not “telling” your readers:You could make every single visual by yourself, or you could use my best-kept infographic design hack: Purchase community-made visual assets from online marketplaces. Websites like Graphic River, Creative Market, and Flat Icon sell visual assets made by professional designers that you can purchase and use in your projects.For example, check out this sleek icon set you could purchase and use on any of your infographics:There are dozens of other icons sets, illustrations, header images, and more that you can use to give your infographic a more professional look and feel immediately.However, if you’re like me, once in awhile you want to make your own visuals from scratch. For example, one day I couldn’t find a decent “flat style” image for a fire pit, so I decided to use the “Shapes” tool in Keynote to “build” my own firepit. Check out how I made it below: Topics: Want to learn how to plan, publish, and promote viral infographics?You’re in the right place. But let’s start by making something clear: If you’re thinking, “I’m not a natural designer” or “I’ve never made an infographic before,” you’re not alone.However, instead of making excuses, answer this: Have you ever made a presentation in PowerPoint or Keynote?Great. Believe it or not, you’ve got the skills to make an infographic. And now that I know you can do this, I’m here to walk you through the seven steps that I take when creating infographics.Save countless hours using these free, pre-made templates to design your infographics.The plan is to cover each of those steps in detail so you know exactly how to create and launch infographics for your business as well. Let’s dive in.How to Create Shareable Infographics Using PowerPoint or Keynote123Save123SaveStep #1: Choose topic and collect content.If you’ve already got a blog and some content under your belt, the best place to find a topic is to look at your most popular content from the past.Just head over to Google Analytics (or dig into your HubSpot software) and pull up your most popular pages (from the last 6-12 months) by going to Behavior > Site Content > All Pages.From there you’ll be able to see which topics your readers are already most interested in.It’s a smart idea to match your infographics to the topic of your most popular blog posts because:First, you’ll be able to content from those blog posts in your infographic to fast-track your project.Second, you already know your audience is interested in those topics.For example, one of the clients I work with owns an interior design firm and her blog has some great content on it. But the most popular blog post month after month was her article on “questions to ask when interviewing an interior designer.”So we decided to use that content and create an infographic around that topic:Because all of the content was already written, all we had to do was come up with the design.Alright, so what if you don’t have a lot of content to work with?I recommend that you head over to Google Trends, Google’s Keyword Planner, HubSpot’s Keywords App, and/or BuzzSumo to research what’s being searched for and shared most often.If you’ve never used Google Trends, then you’re in for a treat. You can use this tool to see what topics are trending and most popular in real time. Plus, you can see how popular a topic was in the past and then compare that to other topics.Check out the popularity of “infographics” vs. “magazine ads” from 2004 – 2016:So how do you guarantee your topic will be a home run?Use Google’s Keyword Planner (HubSpot customers: Try HubSpot’s Keyword App) to see the exact number of people who search for specific keywords and topics so you can instantly gauge the popularity of a topic. Since we’re talking about creating viral infographics in this post, don’t forget to also research your topic in BuzzSumo so you can find the most shared topics and content online to confirm people’s interest. Once you’ve got a topic, it’s time to do some research. One of the best parts about infographics is that you don’t have to write much copy by yourself — almost every single infographic online includes quotes, data, and resources from other people and brands.To get started, you’ll want to open up an app like Evernote and write down everything you personally know about the topic you’re covering, plus every sub-topic you want to research.After you’ve got your own notes down, head over to Google Search and start the research process. For example, type in phrases like: “best (my topic) articles,” “(my topic) statistics,” “(my topic) quotes,” “(my topic) blogs,” and “(my topic) infographics.”This will give you dozens of great resources to pull ideas and data from that you can include in your infographic. Just don’t forget to save the website address (URL) for each resource you cite.Lastly, it’s important that you remember this is an infographic — not a blog post. That means you should only collect the most important, focused data and resources. Ignore all the gritty details and “fluff.”Action items for Step #1:Choose and validate a topic for your infographicCollect and cite important resources you’ll quoteStep #2: Create and re-size a blank presentation.This step is super easy. All you need to do here is create a blank presentation deck in either PowerPoint or Keynote and resize it to the shape/size of an infographic.Personally, I prefer Keynote. But rest assured that every single tool you need to make infographics are available in both PowerPoint and Keynote.Let’s start with PowerPoint: Click “Design” then “Slide Size” to resize your deck.(Note: 6.5 x 50 inches in the maximum size in PowerPoint.)For Keynote: Go to the “Document” options, click “Slide Size” to resize your deck.(Note: 900 x 6000 points in the maximum size in Keynote.)Don’t agonize over getting the “perfect” height for your infographic, just give yourself enough space to work with. (You’ll learn how to crop and optimize your infographic in step #6.)Action items for Step #2:Create a blank presentation in PowerPoint or Keynote.Resize the deck to an infographic-friendly size.Step #3: Wireframe each section using shapes.Both PowerPoint and Keynote have “Shape” tools which will allow you to create (you guessed it) shapes.PowerPoint has more options for shapes than Keynote as you can see below:In this step, our goal will be to use those shapes to create a “wireframe” and layout each section you’ll need for your infographic.Here are the basic areas / sections that you’ll need to create:Header / Title AreaIntroductionBody / Main ArgumentConclusion“Brought to you by…” SectionCited ResourcesIn most cases, each of these sections on every infographic will remain relatively the same. The only exception is the “Body / Main Argument” section, which will vary depending on your goal for the infographic.For example, a comparison infographic would need to have a different “wireframe” and layout than a timeline infographic to effectively illustrate your point:That’s why it’s smart (like with any creative project) to start with the end in mind. The creation process will be a lot easier if you can picture an outcome and work towards that. And I’ve seen too many infographics fail because they focus too much on fancy design instead of creating a solid wireframe and layout that compliments their topic.Let’s be clear: The “design” is how your information looks, but the “layout” is how your information is organized and presented. The layout is far more important than any fancy design elements.First, you’ll want to use rectangles and borders to define large areas of your infographic like in the example below:Don’t worry about the colors just yet, we’ll get to those in the next step.Next, using a combination of rectangles, squares, circles, triangles, and lines, create your subsections:When creating your wireframe and layouts, there are two important design rules to consider:You need to make sure there is enough white space so your infographic is easy to read.You need to create hierarchy with your most important content and sections at the top. Originally published Oct 31, 2016 6:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017last_img read more

What We Learned From Spending $100k On Facebook Ads

first_imgFor a three-person digital marketing team like ours, the prospect of having a big ad budget seemed like a distant dream. So when we were suddenly given $100K to spend on Facebook ads, we were positively giddy.And unbelievably nervous.As a lean SaaS startup, we have to be very wise with our marketing investments. Couple that with our low cost-per-sale ($24/monthly for our starter plan), and you can see that being cost-effective while still spending on ads is a challenge.In May of 2016, we had the honor of working with Facebook Canada. We received a small grant to kickstart our advertising initiatives, and had the opportunity to spend two full days with one of their ad reps.Other than working with the Facebook team, we are completely in-house. On one hand this was an advantage — since we could make changes to the program in seconds rather than days — on the other hand, we were on our own for creative, landing pages, and analytics.We ran an early prototype campaign with some decent success. In fact, it performed in the same neighbourhood as our other digital advertising initiatives. Cool beans.But that was just the start. We’d tasted success, and knew that we were only scratching the surface. So, naturally, we made a pitch to our company’s executive team to increase our digital marketing budget so we could prove that Facebook was a viable avenue for growth. Our commitment to the business: generate trials at a cost-effective rate of $50/trial.Our pitch was a success, and we found ourselves with a considerable ad budget. Now it was real — it was time to build out an end-to-end Facebook Ads strategy.Admittedly, we were quite nervous. Our credibility was on the line.Here’s what we ended up learning from that process, wrinkles and all. Read on to the end to see our results.Lesson 1: Fully commit resources or your cost-per-acquisition (CPA) will rise swiftly.We received our first lesson early on. We had become complacent with the success of our ad creative in May 2016, and tried to replicate that again. Using the same ad creative from AdWords, we launched on Facebook Ads. Initially, it worked. We generated trials at an acceptable rate.But we mistakenly saw this initial success as a sign that we could set it and forget it. We went back to focusing on our other digital marketing strategies, like creating organic content, while our CPAs gradually rose.Facebook CPAs have a nasty habit of rising suddenly — I mean, literally blowing up overnight. One morning, we logged into our marketing dashboard and saw that we were generating trials at twice our target CPA of $50/trial. This was crazy business, and we needed to act fast.Fixing this problem took a lot of time and resources, and a few calls with our dedicated Facebook Ads guru (shout-out to the brilliant Mike Empey). The problem was Ad Frequency. What happened was that our Facebook ad frequency had risen so high that our addressable market was seeing ads 3-5 times a day. Ugh. So of course CPAs rose accordingly — we were irritating people to no end.We resolved to take two actions: first, we swapped in new creative. In fact, we created 5 new ads to push into market. This had an immediate impact, and gave us a deep understanding of how detrimental ad fatigue can be.Second, and more importantly, we committed to a new process for our creative. We call it “the conveyor belt.” Here’s how it works:Week 1: Design and launch new ad creative in 1-3 ad sets. Test and analyze results.Week 2: Push all variations to all ad sets. Turn off old ads. Analyze initial results.Week 3: Pick winning variations from ad sets. Analyze and deconstruct results.Week 4: Assess week 1-3 learnings. Apply those learning to new ad creative. The side benefit of this process is that we’ve tested so many ad variants that we now have a repository of “winning variants” that we can quickly call out of retirement if our CPAs rise.Lesson 2: Segment your audiences to effectively manage ad set CPAs.Initially, I think we underestimated the amount of ad sets we’d need to manage. Looking back, I cringe to think we only launched our prospecting campaign with three ad sets: USA, Canada, and Europe (today we manage between 50 and 70 ad sets, depending on ad performance).We weren’t even going beyond some basic audience targeting.No age specification. No regional targeting. No device targeting. Just a giant ad campaign.We were confident in our ad creative and landing page conversion rates, but forgot the importance of audience profiling. It’s no wonder that our results were really hard to interpret. I remember naively saying to Valerie Hamilton, our digital marketing specialist, “Europe is performing well today. What’s the story?”We didn’t know. Were women converting better than men? Was a certain age bracket doing better than another one? We had no clue.And at this point our CPAs were still floating about 25% higher than our target. It would have been a dramatic understatement to say we had some optimization work to do.We started to analyze our lead generation activities across demographic lines. We used a combination of Facebook Ads, Google Analytics, Mixpanel, and Salesforce data. What we found out was that we did remarkably better with people aged between 24-45. This totally makes sense, too.Folks older than 45 are typically in a more senior role, and rarely the ones actually building or trialing our product. Instead, they are often the ones marshaling their team to demo our software.Our first action was to split out this age range and only focus on where we saw the most success. By cutting more expensive CPA audiences, we were able to reduce our CPA.Since then, we’ve adjusted our messaging to the >45 crowd by including more language about “their team” and “data transparency.” We’ve also focused a lot more of our ad buys on video assets instead of advertising our free trial.It’s worth mentioning that we had good reasons for avoiding audience segmentation. First, we didn’t have the capacity to manage dozens of ad sets. Second, we wanted to keep our addressable market as large as possible and let our learnings help us figure out where to whittle down.Lesson 3: Geographic bidding makes sense when you know regional lifetime values (LTVs).The other side of the demographic coin for us was splitting out geographies. Treating Europe as a homogeneous advertising market just didn’t make sense for our business at the time (see Lesson 8, where we experimented with world-wide delivery).While our European campaign was performing well enough, it was clear that we were missing an opportunity. For instance, we knew that leads from specific geographies often convert to customers at a much higher rate, and that their LTV was much higher on average.In broad outreach campaigns, for example, we saw that we were attracting a high number of leads at $15/trial from Greece and Hungary. But while we have great customers in that part of the world, we’ve run a number of internal reports that show paid leads from that region convert at a much lower rate.Despite paying such a low CPA, these leads were not converting and we were paying far too much for them. Internal reports (plus complaints from our sales team) had us digging deep into the data.This is when the lesson clicked for us; we realized it was okay to spend a lot more on leads from, say, the Netherlands, because their LTV and conversion rates were much, much higher.By splitting out different geographies, we enhanced our ability to match CPA targets to an appropriate LTV.Lesson 4: Matching ad creative and landing pages.This is textbook digital marketing, true. But it was a challenge for our scrappy digital marketing team to prioritize this while managing a $100K budget and driving all the day-to-day campaigns required for a fast-growing startup.Plus, we could rationalize pushing this aside because our landing page was performing reasonably well.But when you’re spending $100K and your CPAs continue to fluctuate, every conversion opportunity is magnified ten-fold.With our small team and only one dedicated designer, we needed to call in the big guns. We went with Unbounce, and it’s had a measureable impact on our landing page conversion rates, helping us grab an 18% conversion rate for Facebook Ads leads. As we design ad creative, we create its sister landing page. From there, we can make tweaks to the page to improve conversion rates. Little things like form position, who we featured in our testimonials, and even which button colours we chose amounted to some big improvements.Lesson 5: The one-two punch of video advertisement.We’ve always been huge users of video to demo the product and create awareness. We’ve created explainer videos that talk about our primary unique selling proposition and give a glimpse into the product, and these videos have been quite successful in garnering views, holding attention spans, and increasing conversions.As we launched on Facebook, we put ad dollars behind one particular video. Again, good success, but we felt like we could do better. This decision was more on gut feel (it still counts!) that video had a big role to play. I mean, just scroll through your Facebook feed right now. The challenge for us was that we’d committed to the business that we’d generate trials at or below our target CPA for that entire $100K. Video doesn’t have that wonderful direct line to trial that a prospecting campaign does. So, we took a chance, and our product marketing manager, Chris Wolski, called up an Ottawa video production company we now affectionately call “The Rascals.”We created a fun, 35-second explainer video that we thought would play well on Facebook and Instagram. The fact is that we generated a hundred thousand views before we could blink.How? People were actually sharing the video with friends and family, even tagging others in the comments section. We noticed lively conversations taking place directly on the posts themselves, as if the videos weren’t advertisements at all. Here’s that video:Facebook makes it easy to create remarketing programs by creating lists of users that engage with your video. We set up a list for anyone that watched more than 10 seconds of the video. This was a new cost-effective avenue for generating leads well within our target CPA. Video remarketing leads typically come in at about $30/trial, including the initial video buy.More importantly, it expanded our reach on Facebook and Instagram exponentially. And we’ve seen traffic to our site go up as a direct result of these ads.Lesson 6: Create video specifically for Facebook Ads.When we launched on video, we didn’t really know what to expect. Lots of views? Engagement? Shares?As a metrics-obsessed company, we knew we needed to establish a KPI. After doing some research and chatting with peers and the account team at Facebook, we decided on Cost-Per-10-second view.We chose this KPI to help us drive better video engagement and brand recognition. If someone was interested enough to pass over cat videos and baby pictures to watch 10 seconds of our B2B software video, then we were doing something right.This KPI has fed directly into our production process, too. We’ve worked with The Rascals to ensure that each video includes text to account for the fact that Facebook’s default setting is to mute video. We’ve also added captions to the mix because videos on Facebook autoplay with the sound off; a whopping 85% of Facebook videos are played with no sound. We would have had disastrous results if we’d relied entirely on the audio within the video to tell our story.The overall result has been slashing our Cost-Per-10-second view by 50%. This is huge because it means for the same dollar of spend, we’re effectively doubling our reach. And you can bet this metric is front and center on our internal social media dashboards.Lesson 7: Ask for advice and trade ideas.I could rant for days about how much we learned from Facebook— they were truly fantastic, and the attention we received ensured we’d be successful. That said, there are no special or secret tricks. You can find everything through a Google search for “Facebook Ads Tips.”Putting all those tips and best practices together into a single campaign, however, is where the real challenge lies.Throughout the process we sought advice from those who’ve been there before us, who have been learning from others years before we even thought of going this route. It probably comes as no surprise that our team now pays close attention to what other advertisers do on Facebook. In particular, I think Shopify is a leader in this respect. They do a great job of integrating video.We’ve also struck up a friendship with the team over at PageCloud , and have enjoyed freely sharing ideas. Many of those conversations have spawned new ad campaigns and experiments. Which leads me to …Lesson 8: Boldly experiment.We allocated a percentage of our budget towards experimentation. When we heard about a new product from Facebook called World-Wide Delivery (WWD) we sort of rolled our eyes and remembered what we had learned about geographic bidding from Lesson 3.But our friend Mike Empey at Facebook persuaded us to give it a try. So we did. What did we have to lose?The experiment was a huge success and with just a small percentage of our daily budget we were able to practically double lead volume. In fact, this contributed to us setting daily trial record numbers for 3 days in a row.When the dust had settled, we analyzed the lead quality, made adjustments to our copy and landing pages, and added WWD campaigns to our arsenal of ads.Lesson 9: Advertising is still top of the funnel.Asking someone to start a trial of your software is a lot like calling a friend and asking them to catch up with you over coffee in an hour. The message is out of the blue and entails a time commitment. No matter what their interest level is, they simply may not be able to do it right then.As we stressed about hitting our trial CPA numbers, we started to lose sight of what we were really trying to do, which was raise awareness and leave our audience with positive first impressions.In chasing those numbers, we ended up making a series of small decisions that led to us making a big mistake: we’d cut so much content from our landing page that it had basically become just an image with a signup form.Sure, that page converted well. But it also pissed people off. Some people were getting so upset that they were commenting on the ads themselves.At this point, we’d driven down CPAs to about $10 under our target CPA. Our hands were sore from the amount of high-fives we’d collected and shoulders we’d patted. But in that process we committed an egregious error: we forgot about the customer.We were so caught up in the metrics that we forgot that leads are people.So, we did the only reasonable thing. We added essential content back into our landing pages (including video content from Vidyard into every landing page), and worked on optimizing that content so the customer could wring as much value from it as possible.Of course, CPAs rose. But our ad relevance and positive scores rose along with it.That was the kind of customer-centric tradeoff we were willing to take.Editor’s Note: Editor’s Note: a version of this post first appeared on Inbound.org, HubSpot’s community for inbound marketers.  Topics: Social Mediacenter_img Originally published Jun 22, 2017 8:00:00 AM, updated October 29 2019 Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

We Asked Our Audience What They Really Think of PDF Ebooks: A HubSpot Experiment

first_imgI don’t know about you, but I barely print anything anymore.Seriously, think about it — when’s the last time you had to type Command + P and print out a document? Between e-tickets, virtual payment options, and online signature tools, I think the last thing I printed out was the lease for my apartment.So you can imagine my surprise when HubSpot’s audience started telling us they still like to print out our ebooks — which are often 20 or 30 pages in length — instead of viewing them on a web page.In 2017 — during the era of self-driving cars, augmented and virtual reality, and artificial intelligence — our team here at HubSpot is constantly striving to test and implement the most modern techniques for content creation to provide cool, useful resources for our audience. But as it turns out, our perceptions of what our audience actually values when they download out content were a little … off.In this post, I’ll dive into our hypothesis, how we tested it, and what we’re learning about our audience — and how they actually like to consume our content.What We DoI work on HubSpot’s Marketing Acquisition team creating content offers — such as our downloadable ebooks, guides, and templates — that our audience exchanges their contact information for in order to download them.If you’re familiar with the inbound marketing methodology we’ve been teaching here at HubSpot for more than 10 years, I operate in the “Convert” stage of the process of helping new people discover and learn about HubSpot:When a person happens upon HubSpot for the first time online — via a blog post like this one, through social media, or by conducting a Google search — they might see a bold, brightly-colored call-to-action (CTA) encouraging them to learn more about a particular topic or product.And in order to get that information — from an ebook, a guide, a template, a webinar, or an event — the person has to hand over their contact information. This ensures they can receive an emailed version of the content offer or event registration, and it also converts them from a visitor into a lead.My job is to create content that visitors are so interested in learning more about that they exchange their phone number, email address, and professional background information. And to make sure we keep converting visitors into leads for the health of HubSpot’s business, I make sure that ebooks, guides, and events are helpful, fascinating, and ultimately educate our audience on how to do inbound marketing.What We WonderedFor the most part, my team’s job has entailed creating PDFs that visitors can download once they submit a form with their contact information.More specifically, this has meant creating a lot of PDFs.And although people were filling out forms and downloading our content offers, we started wondering if we should offer them something different — something more cutting-edge — than a file format created back in 1993. And we wondered if changing the format of our content offers would change conversion rates, too.We decided to run a survey — and a little test.We wanted to know if our core persona who we marketed these content offers to still liked PDFs and found them useful. So, how else would we find out than by creating an offer?I created two different version of the same content offer — one in PDF format, and one in web page format. Then, once someone downloaded the offer, we sent them a thank-you email, and we asked them which format they preferred, and why.What We LearnedMore than 3,000 individuals submitted their information to access the offer, and roughly 9% responded to our question, which gave us more than 300 responses to learn from.And much to our surprise, 90% of the respondents preferred downloading a PDF to reading our content on a web page.We gleaned a ton of valuable information about our core audience from this survey, and the qualitative feedback was incredibly helpful, too. Our key takeaways about format preferences were:Our core persona likes to print offers.People viewing our content want to be able to download it and come back to it later.People don’t think our web page offers look as good as PDFs.Some people are potentially defaulting to the format they know best.People liked having both print and online versions.It’s incredibly helpful to learn what’s going on behind the decisions and choices our audience makes to inform future strategy when it comes to content creation. But this information leaves us with a challenge, too: How do we get our audience excited about content living on interactive web pages, too?Content living on web pages can be crawled by Google to improve websites’ domain authority (and SEO superpowers) — and PDFs can’t be. So we’re making it our mission to keep offering our audience different options for consuming content the way they want to — while innovating and testing new ways to offer content our core persona is just as excited about in a web-based format.I’ll be back with more details about that next experiment, but in the meantime, download one of our latest content offers, and let us know if you like the format in the comments.What’s your opinion? PDF or web page? Share with us what you learned in the comments below. Originally published Jun 23, 2017 8:00:00 AM, updated June 28 2019 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! Content Marketinglast_img read more

Body found identity known Police waiting to tell parents

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppIt has been nearly three days since the discovery of a woman’s body in Pirates Cove, Provo and Police have still not classified the investigation where possibly, another killer could be on the loose.  Police have identified the body, but resist confirming if it is missing 26 year old Uneira Veras.  Bahamas Police takes 10 to court for murders and other crimes, including a couple for cruelty to a child Magnetic Media was told last night that parents of the victim must first be informed.  Pirates Cove is a remote historic and ecological site in the north-west area of Provo; the discovery was madeSaturday afternoon. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for youcenter_img TCI Police Commissioner says absolute focus is reducing crime, gives some insight into the decreases recorded Related Items:body found, crime, murder, tci crime Worst fears as a tourist is murdered in Providenciales; ten homicides for 2019last_img read more

2 killed in gunfights with law enforcers

first_imgTwo persons were killed in separate incidents of alleged gunfights with members of law enforcement agencies early Monday.Of them, one was killed in Tangail and the other in Mymensingh.According to news agency UNB, a man was killed in an alleged gunfight with members of Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) at Dainna Chowdhury Madhyapara in Tangail’s Sadar upazila.The RAB has identified that the deceased was Sharif aka Farhad, 33, a resident of Gala village of the upazila and district unit president of outlawed Purba Banglar Communist Party.Tipped off that Sharif along with his associates was staying in the area, a team of RAB conducted a drive there around 2:00am, said major Robiul Islam of RAB-12.Sensing presence of the elite force, Sharif and his cohorts attacked the team in a bid to protect them, triggering the gunfight.After the gunfight, the RAB team recovered the body and one foreign pistol, one magazine and four bullets from the scene.In Mymensingh, Sharifur Rahman Sharif, 32, a suspected drug trader and son of late Nazim Uddin of Kristapur area in the city, was killed in a reported gunfight with police in Kalibari By-lane area around 1:45am.Shah Kamal Akand, officer-in-charge of Detective Branch of police, said on information that a gang of drug traders gathered in the area to distribute contraband drugs, a team of police conducted a drive.Sensing the presence of police, the gang hurled brick chips and opened fire on police, prompting them to fire back, triggering the gunfight.The gunfight left Sharifur dead on the spot.Two policemen were also injured, said the OC adding that they recovered 100 yaba tablets and five kilograms of hemp from the spot.last_img read more

PM pays tribute to Bangabandhu on his 100th birthday

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina pays tributes to father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman marking his 100th birthday on Sunday. Photo: BSSPrime minister Sheikh Hasina on Sunday paid tributes to father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman heralding the nationwide programmes on the occasion of the 100th birthday of the great leader, reports BSS.The prime minister paid the homage by placing a wreath at the portrait of Bangabandhu in front of Bangabandhu Memorial Museum at the historic 32 Dhanmondi Road in the capital city this morning.After laying the wreath, she stood in solemn silence for some time as a mark of respect to the memory of father of the nation.Cabinet members, PM’s advisers, parliament members and senior leaders of the ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) were also present here.Later, flanked by the central party leaders of the AL, Sheikh Hasina laid another wreath at the portrait of Bangabandhu on behalf of her party as the president of the party.The prime minister’s adviser HT Imam, AL advisory council Members Amir Hossain Amu, Tofail Ahmed and advocate Yusuf Hossain Humayun, presidium members Begum Matia Chowdhury, Abdul Matin Khashru and Abdur Razzaque, acting general secretary Mahbub-ul Alam Hanif, joint secretary Abdur Rahman, organising secretaries AFM Bahauddin Nasim, Enamul Haque Shamim, B M Mozemmel Haque, Khalid Mahmud Chowdhury and Abu Sayeed Al Mahmud Swapan, publicity and publication secretary Hasan Mahmud, information and research secretary advocate Afzal Husain, relief and welfare secretary Sujit Roy Nandi and other leaders of the party were present on the occasion.Later, the leaders of associate bodies of the Awami League and other socio-cultural organisations placed wreaths at the portrait of Bangabandhu.The birthday of Bangabandhu is being observed across the country today as the National Children’s Day.The theme of this year’s birthday of Bangabandhu and National Children’s Day is “Bangabandhu’s birthday, rinse life of the children with colour”.last_img read more

50 million year old sperm cells found in fossilized cocoon

first_img Researchers find fossilized ciliate in 200 million year old leech cocoon (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with members from institutions in Sweden, Argentina and Italy, has discovered fossilized sperm cells embedded in the walls of an ancient cocoon. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes how they came across the sperm fossils while studying a 50 million year old cocoon found on Seymour Island in Antarctica. © 2015 Phys.org Explore further Diagram illustrating the inferred mode of fossilization of microorganisms in clitellate cocoons, exemplified by a common medicinal leech (reproductive stages modified from Sims). (a) Two leeches mate; (b) a cocoon is secreted from the clitellum; (c) eggs and sperm are released into the cocoon before the animal retracts and eventually deposits the sealed cocoon on a suitable substrate (d). Insets depict enlargements of the inner cocoon-wall surface showing how spermatozoa and microbes become encased in the solidifying inner cocoon wall. Credit: Biology Letters, DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0431 More information: Fossilized spermatozoa preserved in a 50-Myr-old annelid cocoon from Antarctica, Biology Letters, DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0431AbstractThe origin and evolution of clitellate annelids—earthworms, leeches and their relatives—is poorly understood, partly because body fossils of these delicate organisms are exceedingly rare. The distinctive egg cases (cocoons) of Clitellata, however, are relatively common in the fossil record, although their potential for phylogenetic studies has remained largely unexplored. Here, we report the remarkable discovery of fossilized spermatozoa preserved within the secreted wall layers of a 50-Myr-old clitellate cocoon from Antarctica, representing the oldest fossil animal sperm yet known. Sperm characters are highly informative for the classification of extant Annelida. The Antarctic fossil spermatozoa have several features that point to affinities with the peculiar, leech-like ‘crayfish worms’ (Branchiobdellida). We anticipate that systematic surveys of cocoon fossils coupled with advances in non-destructive analytical methods may open a new window into the evolution of minute, soft-bodied life forms that are otherwise only rarely observed in the fossil record.center_img Journal information: Biology Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: 50 million year old sperm cells found in fossilized cocoon (2015, July 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-million-year-sperm-cells-fossilized.html It is very rare to find fossilized examples of sperm cells because they are soft-bodied—they have no bones. Prior examples have mostly been found in amber. The fossils found by the researchers in this new effort were discovered by accident—the researchers were merely studying the intricacies of a fossilized worm, or leech (of the class Clitellata) cocoon they had found on the island to learn more about the creature that left it behind. In making their cocoon, the ancient worm would have applied jelly-like material to the walls, which would remain in that state for just a couple of days—sperm would have been deposited inside as a means of fertilization, and in a few cases become embedded in the cocoon wall, where it then became fossilized after the walls hardened.The fossilized sperm cells are tiny of course, just 60 micrometers long and resemble those of modern crayfish worms, the team reports, which is odd, because modern crayfish worms live only in the northern hemisphere. They have elongated head areas, a central region that holds the nucleus and extremely long tails. Dating has placed the age of the cocoon and its contents at 50 million years, which means the discovery is the oldest sperm cells ever found, by a margin of 10 million years.After hearing reports of nematodes being trapped in some other ancient cocoons, the team was encouraged to look closer at the specimen they had found—they used an electron scanning microscope to examine the walls of the cocoon and found multiple sperm cells, though the team notes, the fossils are not actual cells—there is no organic material there—instead they are impressions left by the cells which long ago deteriorated. To gain a better perspective of their find, they created 3D models. They also note that it is likely other such specimens exist in already found cocoons but have not yet been discovered because researchers have not looked close enough.last_img read more

St Kitts announces expanded Air Canada service at culinary event

first_imgMost notable new offering? Expanded Air Canada service, with a second weekly nonstop from Toronto on Tuesdays from Feb. 11 through April 14, 2020. The added flight complements already existing nonstops on Saturday and extends Air Canada’s service to St. Kitts to six months of the year.According to Paul Minich, Market Consultant for The St. Kitts Tourism Authority in Canada, the extra flight is a reflection of growing demand by Canadians for the destination: “We are experiencing strong growth from Canada and this expansion of service is very significant to the destination. We are thrilled.”More news:  War of words between Transat, Group Mach ramps upRacquel Brown, CEO of the St. Kitts Tourism Authority, added: “Following its extension of service to St. Kitts to six months of the year for winter 2018-2019 and the upgauging of the majority of those flights from a 136-seat Airbus A-319 to a 200-seat Airbus A-321 aircraft, Air Canada’s addition of mid-week flying from Toronto for the first time in our history is a huge benefit for us. Allowing more flexibility in travellers’ length of stay, it provides one more building block to help up to continue our momentum of strong arrivals growth from Canada that we are achieving through targeted marketing to the affluent traveller in the golf and lifestyle niche markets.”For the first four months of 2019, air passenger arrivals from Air Canada increased over 60% compared to the same period in 2018. Its new Tuesday flight will significantly increase the amount of available seats to carry travellers to the island, thereby reinforcing the island’s potential air arrivals growth for 2020.More news:  Sunwing ready to launch Mazatlán-Quebec City direct this winterAir Canada first began serving St. Kitts non-stop on Fridays in peak season from Toronto Pearson International Airport in 2011 and subsequently shifted to Saturday service. It is the island’s only non-stop scheduled service from Canada. In 2018, service expanded from peak season only to operate for a six-month period starting in November 2018 through the end of April 2019.The new Tuesday flight will operate on a 136-seat Airbus A-319 with 12 Premium Rouge and 124 Economy class seats. Flight AC1730 will depart YYZ at 11:20 a.m. and arrive at SKB at 5:05 p.m, while return flight AC1731 will depart SKB at 5:55 p.m. and arrive at YYZ at 10:05 p.m. << Previous PostNext Post >> Posted by Share Tags: Air Canada, Culinary Tourism, St. Kitts TORONTO — It was all hands on deck at St. Kitts Tourism Authority’s second annual culinary event where travel agents helped prepare mouthwatering recipes from popular Kittitian restaurants.Taking place at Toronto’s Cirillo’s Culinary Academy last week, the second annual, sold-out event included a full house of Tripcentral travel professionals who were given an update on what’s new on the island. Tuesday, July 2, 2019 St. Kitts announces expanded Air Canada service at culinary event Travelweek Group last_img read more