Lessons learned at St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Vicki R. FitzsimmonsPosted Jun 28, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 28, 2012 at 11:10 pm While a visitor at St Andrews, i saw some of the work done , and the smiling faces. Also saw the smiling faces creating more smiling faces! Truly a blessing. 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Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Vicki Fitzsimmons[Episcopal News Service] On the first Thursday of each month (except July), St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Nogales, Arizona, is transformed into St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic. Here, children living in Mexico (not the U.S.) come for free, specialized medical care; for some it is their last hope. God is at work through volunteers providing health care for children with serious medical conditions, such as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, vision loss, Down syndrome, etc. The parents cannot afford the needed medical care, or Mexican doctors have given up on the patients.St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic was founded in 1973 by a group of mothers in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. They had children with cerebral palsy and wanted to know how to help them. One of them knew a therapist in Tucson. When she came to show them how to work with their children, she noted that some could be helped with orthopedic surgery. She invited Dr. Frankel, an orthopedic surgeon in Tucson, to accompany her on her next visit. From this beginning, word spread that these children were being helped in neighbors’ homes. The number of patients became larger, and the informal clinic was moved to a nearby orphanage. When Mexican doctors became concerned about American doctors practicing medicine in Mexico, Dr. Frankel looked for a site across “the line” in Nogales, Arizona. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and its parishioners welcomed the small clinic.Dr. Frankel brought in a specialist to fit braces and prostheses. An audiologist was recruited when it was noted that many children did not hear well. Word of mouth increased both the number of patients and number and variety of health professionals who volunteered. In 1977 the clinic began a partnership with Shriners hospitals in Spokane and Sacramento to provide needed surgeries. Doctors and nurses from these hospitals come to each clinic to assess children for surgery at their hospitals and to do follow-up on their patients. The clinic arranges and finances transportation for each patient and one parent.In 1990, St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic, Inc. received its 501(c)(3) status. The board of directors appointed the Rev. Ed Gustafson, an Episcopal priest, as its first executive director. The clinic has continued to grow and has stabilized to approximately 200-250 patients per clinic day. The health departments staffed by volunteers are audiology, cardiology, dermatology, nutrition, occupational therapy, orthotics, orthopedics, Reiki therapy, pediatrics, physical therapy, psychology, speech therapy, and  vision. Specialists fit children with special shoes, wheelchairs, strollers, and walkers. All is provided free to the patients.I was invited to visit the clinic by friends I knew from attending St. Francis-in-the-Valley Episcopal Church in Green Valley, approximately 30 miles north of Nogales. I went, had a tour, felt that I could do something, and returned the next month to volunteer in the kitchen. At the time, I was spending the summer doing research and writing in our vacation home in Green Valley. While at the clinic, I felt this wonderful presence in the church, so I went to church services on Sunday and was welcomed by the parishioners. When my husband Jim returned to take me back to Illinois, I told him that I had changed churches and hoped he didn’t mind.I returned to the University of Illinois for the academic year where I taught personal finance. My mind kept returning to the clinic. I was also preparing for retirement and wondering what I would do in retirement. I prayed for direction, and the answer was that I hadn’t seen a newsletter for the clinic. Since I wrote a personal finance newsletter for high school teachers, I thought this would be a good fit. When we retired and met with Fr. Ed about what we could do for the clinic, I told him what answer had been given to my prayer. He said, “And I’ve been praying for a newsletter editor.” Incidentally, Jim became involved too, first driving the van to transport patients and families between the border and the church on clinic day, then helping to transform the church to a clinic and back, and now treasurer and clinic board member.Now I write the quarterly newsletter, take photos for the website as well as for the newsletter, and handle any needed publicity for the clinic. In this role, I go to all the departments throughout the church and preschool building, even the rector’s office, on clinic day and interview doctors, patients, and parents. Sometimes I have an interpreter working with me; sometimes not. I speak a little Spanish, which helps.What I do is a labor of love -I am a volunteer. I have learned that it’s not about me and what I do; it’s about the children who come to our clinic. Their smiles as they receive needed care or a new wheel chair makes all my time and energy worthwhile.Angela, born with only partial legs, shows her new prosthetic feet. Photo/Vicki FitzsimmonsI get to see the wonderful work that our volunteer doctors and health care practitioners do at every clinic. Veronica was born with a severely deformed foot, one she would never be able to walk on. She went to Shriners Hospital for amputation of her foot. To do a story for the clinic newsletter, Jim and I went to Tucson to see the preliminary fitting of her new prosthesis. What joy on that child’s face! Three years later, her mother showed me a prized possession – a gold medal Veronica won in a race using her prosthetic leg. Her mother was so proud of her daughter.Angela was born with no feet and partial legs. She, too, had surgery to amputate her legs. When she was seven, we took her to a presentation of funds to charities. Angela walked and danced her way to the front of the room on her “stubbies” (precursors to prostheses) so she could receive the check for the clinic. She smiled from ear to ear. There was not a dry eye in the room. What courage and stamina in such a small child!There are lots of stories I could share with you, but there is no space here. Please go to our website to learn more about this heart-warming clinic.I also raise funds for clinic patients who cannot speak but can use an alternative communication device such as the SpringBoard, which can be programmed to “talk” with family, friends, and teachers when the child touches parts of the screen. I feel a special bond with these children because I could not talk until I was four years old. Fortunately, I had an easy “fix”; I was tongue-tied. The doctor clipped the membrane holding down my tongue, and I started talking paragraphs. My family says I have never stopped talking since!To raise these funds, once a year I perform a voice recital. Singing is my hobby, and I have taken voice lessons for several years. I enjoy putting together the program, which includes showing an eight-minute video about the clinic, available on our website. Donated funds are targeted to pay for a communications device for a selected child. In March, José Luís got his device and when he saw it, his eyes lit up. He went right to it and started putting phrases together. He had been watching the other children work with their SpringBoards each month while he waited for his device so he knew exactly what to do. What joy I felt watching him communicate more fully for the first time!In the 11 years that I have been involved with this wonderful clinic, I have learned many things: (a) knowledge of a variety of medical problems that were new to me, (b) a greater understanding of Mexican culture and peoples, (c) the joy of being able to communicate with patients and parents in my limited Spanish, and (d) patience. I have watched patients and their parents wait for several hours to see different doctors and therapists. Many of them have traveled 3 to 15 hours or more to arrive at our clinic and waited in line to be processed through Immigration at the border. And, at the end of clinic day, they will travel many miles again before arriving home. And they never complain. When I have to wait in line at the bank, post office, or grocery, I think about all the patience I have seen demonstrated at the clinic, and I wait, patiently.— Vicki R. Fitzsimmons, Ph.D., is a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Nogales, Arizona. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Children Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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Consagraciones, elecciones y consentimientos de septiembre a diciembre de 2012…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Posted Aug 20, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Consagraciones, elecciones y consentimientos de septiembre a diciembre de 2012 en la Iglesia Episcopal El Gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal: Esta información es otra de una serie continua sobre el gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [20 de agosto de 2012] En los próximos cuatro meses del 1 de septiembre al 31 diciembre la Iglesia Episcopal será testigo de las consagraciones de seis obispos y la elección de un obispo.ConsagracionesSeis consagraciones de obispos están programadas de septiembre a diciembre. La Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori oficiará en los servicios de ordinación.6 de octubre: Diócesis de Texas, Sufragáneo: El Rdo Jeff W. Fisher, elegido el 2 de junio13 de octubre: Diócesis de Atlanta: El Muy Rdo Robert C. Wright, elegido el 2 de junio20 de octubre: Diócesis de Pittsburgh: El Rdo Dorsey WM McConnell, elegido el 21 de abril17 de noviembre: Diócesis de Rhode Island: El Muy Rdo Nicholas Knisely, elegido el 2 de junio1 de diciembre: Diócesis del Oeste de Massachusetts: El Rdo Doctor John Douglas Fisher, elegido el 2 de junio15 de diciembre: Diócesis de Lexington, El Muy Rdo Douglas Hahn elegido el 18 de agosto, en espera de un proceso exitoso de autorización canónica.EleccionesDe septiembre a diciembre, hay una elección de obispo prevista:El 10 de noviembre: Diócesis de Eau ClaireProceso de consentimiento canónicoNo hay ningún proceso de consentimiento canónico en curso. Sin embargo, el proceso de consentimiento canónico se espera que comience en septiembre por el candidato elegido el 18 de agosto en la Diócesis de Lexington.Resumen del procesoTras la elección, el candidato elegido es un obispo electo. Después de algunas cuestiones de procedimiento, incluidos los exámenes, se envían las notificaciones oficiales a los obispos con jurisdicción (solamente a obispos diocesanos) con avisos separados a las comisiones permanentes de cada una de las diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal. Estos avisos requieren sus propias medidas y firmas.Para que un obispo electo pueda convertirse en obispo, en virtud del canon III.11.4, 6 de la Iglesia Episcopal, la mayoría de los obispos con jurisdicción y la mayoría de los comités permanentes diocesanos deben dar su consentimiento a la ordenación del obispo electo como obispo dentro de 120 días de haber recibido el aviso de la elección. Estos pasos se dan por separado.Una vez que el Obispo/a Presidente recibe los consentimientos necesarios, deberá “sin demora” notificar a la diócesis que ha elegido y al obispo electo, sin esperar a la expiración del plazo de 120 días, y “deberá”, tras la aceptación de la elección por el obispo elegido, “tomar medidas para la ordenación”.Sin embargo, si la mayoría de los obispos diocesanos no da su consentimiento, y/o la mayoría de las comisiones permanentes no da su consentimiento, el Obispo/a Presidente, en conformidad con el Canon III.11.5, está obligado a declarar la nulidad e invalidez de la elección. En esos casos, una persona elegida por la diócesis no será ordenada. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Living in Egypt through revolution, protests, new opportunities

first_img Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John-Albert Dickert says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Sep 24, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group John Smylie says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler is an Episcopal priest living in Egypt. He has served since 2003 as rector of St. John the Baptist Church in Cairo. In this ENS interview, Chandler reflects on the changes in Egypt over the past two years and speaks about the recent protests triggered by a film containing anti-Islam content.ENS: Egypt has seen some major transformations in the past two years. How would you describe the country’s current political landscape and infrastructure to someone who doesn’t really understand the context?P-GC: Where does one start, when it comes to Egypt over the last 18 months, let alone the last few weeks, even days? Each day is so full of surprise that it is hard to stay up with it all.Obviously, after more than 60 years of authoritarian rule, and decades of being a police state, Egypt is experiencing what might be called “growing pains.” However, it has to be said that in the most democratic elections since 1952, the Egyptians did freely select their leader, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood, who won 51 percent of the vote. The famous Tahrir Square went crazy with joy when the announcement was made. Many were jubilant because a proponent of conservative Islam had won. Others, not so excited about this and even concerned about the agenda of the Muslim Brotherhood, nevertheless rejoiced in the revolution’s true victory.One of the main challenges right now is related to the basic infrastructure of the country, let alone the economic issues. These challenges are really starting to pile up. There is excessive trash everywhere, less security (the police force is minimal), electricity goes off more and more, less medicines are available at pharmacies, wheat is thought to perhaps soon run out, there are shortages of bottled water, etc.One respected political analyst here described the current state of Egypt, well with these words: “Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity…”However, in the midst of it all, we see so many positive signs that are critical for Egypt’s future health, and recognize that one must have a long-term perspective. So we are rooting Egypt on and are immensely proud of the Egyptians.ENS: What have these changes meant for the country in general, and for Christians in particular?P-GC: Those most concerned at Morsi’s victory were the Coptic Christians. Yet the concern was largely based on fear of the unknown. The familiar, even if undesired, always feels more secure. Rumors started proliferating against Morsi, and not only did he try to dismiss their claims, during his victory speech Morsi sought to allay the fears of the Copts. “We as Egyptians, Muslims and Christians … will face together the strife and conspiracies that target our national unity…. We are all equal in rights, and we all have duties towards this homeland.” He even officially resigned from the Muslim Brotherhood following his victory speech. Nevertheless, some Copts are not convinced, instead believing the country has been slowly but surely manipulated into Islamist rule. Egypt is a country of rumors!One of the first actions of President Morsi was to invite the heads of all the Christian denominations to the Presidential Palace. He warmly received them and assured them that Christians are equal citizens in Egypt and it is his duty to make sure that every citizen receives his or her rights. The president also told them stories from the history of Islam of how Muslim leaders were very keen to ensure the right of citizenship of all Christians in Egypt. The president promised to do his best to ensure the rights of Christians, especially in regard to building churches. The Christian leaders came out of the 35-minute meeting very encouraged.Quite remarkably, President Morsi invited the heads of the denominations in Egypt to meet with him last month, for a second time. Twice in less than two months to talk and listen them. This had not happened in Egypt in the last 30 years. President Morsi assured them that his Islamic faith commands him to be gracious and just with people of other faiths. They left the meeting very encouraged and determined to do their best in order to see the Egypt that we all dream of.Where I serve, at St. John’s Episcopal Church in southern Cairo, the unique opportunities for ministry have grown exponentially in this “new Egypt,” with far more religious freedom than before the revolution. We soon host our fall Abraham Forum that brings Christians and Muslims together around a theme relevant to the country. Our special speaker is Jeffrey Fleishman, the Cairo bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times, novelist, and Pulitzer Prize finalist. Nevertheless, regardless of what the reality is, more and more Coptic Christians desire to emigrate. There is too often this inherent fear of the “other.”ENS: What is the latest on the protests in Cairo? Who is protesting and why? Are the protests just a response to the anti-Islam film or is it more complicated than that? P-GC: I know many have been following in the Western media the unrest that has been taking place in Egypt and other parts of the Middle East as a result of the immensely disgraceful film produced by an Egyptian man of Christian background living in the U.S., whose 13-minute film trailer was released on YouTube.We were actually very safe. Most of the unrest was very localized, just around the U.S. Embassy downtown, and though it started out with a couple thousand protesters, it ended up very quickly as a relatively small group. In some other countries, like Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, the protests have ended up with more serious consequences. However, here in Egypt, it has to date been largely a mixture of different groups grasping the chance to serve their own interests, settle scores and express their frustrations. In Egypt, the recent unrest has largely not been from Islamic fundamentalists as portrayed in the media.In this sense, the U.S. Embassy area and nearby Tahrir Square became the battlefield for disgruntled people, and not just a protest against the film. According to the respected Egyptian political analyst and journalist Ayman El-Sayyad, “…people grasped the chance to vent their anger.”As to who these people are, well, it is quite a motley crew, all with differing reasons for demonstrating violently. El Sayyad expressed it well: “It’s…Islamists against the U.S. administration; revolutionaries against [Egyptian] security forces; Salafists [a fundamentalist Islamic group] against the Muslim Brotherhood [who are much more moderate]; and the marginalized [i.e. unemployed] against the reality in which they live.”ENS: How have the president and other political leaders responded to the protests given their commitment to building a more democratic society in Egypt?P-GC: Thankfully, President Morsi, while condemning the dishonorable film, also strongly condemned violence of any kind in demonstrations. This public denouncement of violence helped to dissolve a lot of potentially violent protests.As covered in the New York Times, Khairat El-Shater, the deputy guide of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, said: “Our condolences to the American people for the loss of their ambassador and three members of the embassy staff in Libya.” He went on to highlight that he did not hold the U.S. government or its citizens responsible for the acts of “the few” that abuse the right to free expression, despite his disapproval over this anti-Islam film. He also condemned the “breach of the U.S. embassy premises” by Egyptian protesters, which he described as illegal under international law. He described the current state of Egypt well with these words: “Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity, and public anger must be dealt with responsibly and with caution.”So in short, we are safe and the vast majority of Egyptians continue to be extremely magnanimous in all ways toward guests in their country. While the media often gives the opposite impression, nothing could be further from the reality we experience here.ENS: Some of the justification for producing this anti-Islam film has been based on America’s rights for freedom of speech and expression. What about instances where freedom of speech and expression cause offense to millions of people?P-GC: It is very difficult to explain the concept of freedom of expression in a context like this. The worldview starting point is completely different than in most Western cultures. In a shame culture, which is prevalent in the Middle East, preserving honor is the highest priority. People in different parts of the world react differently, especially when it comes to matters of faith.One thing that is interesting is that the four Episcopal/Anglican diocesan bishops recently sent a joint letter to the Secretary General of the United Nations suggesting “that an international declaration be negotiated that outlaws the intentional and deliberate insulting or defamation of persons (such as prophets), symbols, texts and constructs of belief deemed holy by people of faith.” Their motivation in doing so is that they believe that this might help to avoid the possibility of further violence – between people from different cultural or philosophical backgrounds or followers of different faiths.Whether one believes this is the proper response or not, it does show how seriously local church leaders here are taking all this.[The four bishops are the Most Rev. Mouneer Hanna Anis, bishop of Egypt and president bishop of the Episcopal/Anglican Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East; the Rt. Rev. Michael Owen Lewis, bishop of Cyprus and the Gulf; the Rt. Rev. Bill Musk, area bishop for North Africa; and the Rt. Rev. Grant LeMarquand, area bishop for the Horn of Africa.]ENS: You have said it’s not just Islamic fundamentalists who are protesting. But in some countries, the protests have largely involved people associated with extremist groups have they not, or is that misrepresentation in the media?P-GC: To be very honest, each country’s context is so completely different that it is hard to answer this with any accuracy. One of the challenges we face here is that West often sees the “Muslim World” as this monolithic body, almost as if they are one political and religious entity. However, the issues in one country are as different from those in another country as would be the issues in the U.S. from Denmark, for example, both seen as “Christian countries” in Muslim eyes.ENS: How damaging are the inaccuracies reported in the media?P-GC: First of all, I am not so sure that the Western media necessarily is intentional in mis-portraying the situation. It is most likely that there is a general lack of understanding in order to present the news within the correct context, and also that the very nature of the news media focuses on reporting controversy, which often magnifies what is happening out of proportion. As a result the damage done is that it tends to reinforce negative stereotypes of people in this region based on misinformation.ENS: What does the world need to learn from this series of events?P-GC: I believe all of this is a powerful reminder of how important it is for all people (including those in the media) to be responsible and self-restraining in expressing or promoting insulting or malevolent opinions with regard to religion. Instead, we need to focus on waging peace on all people. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Middle East TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Living in Egypt through revolution, protests, new opportunities An interview with Episcopal priest Paul-Gordon Chandler Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (5) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service September 24, 2012 at 10:04 pm To Our Brother Paul and all In G-d”s Love,I just can’t get the phrase “You will know us by our love” out of my mind. During this Yom Kippur you and all our brothers and sisters will be in my thoughts and prayers. I cannot thank you enough for your shared thoughts and insight into the peoples of Egypt.As Always,John-Albert DickertChrist Church CathedralCincinnati, Ohio USA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Chris Morgan says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 9, 2012 at 5:21 pm Never apologize for our freedom of speech. Some kook someplace, whether in the US or elsewhere will do something, say something, at some time, that offends Muslims. Tell me how you stop that. It is impossible and we look weak when we fail to point this out. To say this film was the cause of the unrest simply demonstrates the cultural problems of Islam. When Islam was the center of intellectual strength and political power, say 500-1000 years ago, no slander or libel of the prophet would have caused a ripple. There is a deep sense of inferiority that permeates the Muslim middle east that can only by remedied with jobs, maturation of political institutions and the rule of law that can be counted on. In other words, growth in the confidence of self. Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing September 24, 2012 at 5:13 pm Thank you for this informative article designed to enlighten not to enrage. September 24, 2012 at 4:35 pm Great article and interview. Thank you for sharing your valuable insights on this issue. September 24, 2012 at 6:12 pm Paul-Gordon, Thank you for your on the ground, reasoned perspective and thank you for your faithful presentation of the gospel. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Ben Badgett says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Elizabeth Marcotte says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

Advent and Christmas resources from Episcopal Relief & Development

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Dec 3, 2012 Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal Relief & Development] This Advent, Episcopal Relief & Development offers a variety of ways to mark the season of anticipation and celebrate the birth of Christ, who heals our hurting world.“Advent is a season to strive toward the coming of Christ, and to further God’s kingdom on earth,” said Rob Radtke, the organization’s President.  “When we take action to seek and serve Christ in others – in our family, our hometown or halfway around the world – we are preparing the way of the Lord.  I hope that Episcopal Relief & Development’s friends and supporters will be inspired to take advantage of the opportunities in their lives to engage joyfully with the spirit of Advent this year.”Episcopal Relief & Development’s 2012 Advent Calendar features reflections, prayers and gift ideas inspired by the organization’s Gifts for Life catalog.  Special “Gifts for Kids” suggestions like nutritious food, quality education and essential health care can help children learn about stewardship, generosity and global needs and concerns.  The online calendar and a downloadable PDF can be found at www.er-d.org/advent.“We invite congregations and individuals alike to walk with us this Advent,” said Judy Sawler, Episcopal Relief & Development’s Manager for Direct Response Marketing. “This year’s Advent calendar calls us to reflect on what we can do to share God’s love with others, and particularly with people in need worldwide.  Our Gifts for Life program is a great way for people to engage with our mission that’s fun and spreads holiday warmth to friends and family.”Gifts for Life are available year-round, but Christmas is the perfect time to give a gift with lasting impact.  New to the catalog this year are rainwater harvesting systems, memberships in women’s literacy groups and vocational training for young and disabled people.  Popular items include goats and chickens, which provide families with a source of milk or eggs, enriching the household diet and helping to generate income.  High-impact gifts like communal wells and vegetable gardens can improve health and wellbeing for an entire community.  And “green gifts” like energy efficient cook stoves and trees for reforestation promote sustainable solutions that protect and nurture the environment.Purchasing Gifts for Life is easy and secure – via mail, over the phone or through the online catalog at www.er-d.org/GiftsForLife.  Printed copies of the catalog can be ordered through Episcopal Marketplace.  Children will love the colorful photographs and engaging stories of how each item makes a difference, making Gifts for Life a wonderful family or Sunday School project.  Gift givers can choose a printed card or a customizable e-card to send to the person in whose honor the purchase was made.For further enrichment, Episcopal Relief & Development has published a set of six Children’s Chapel liturgies that provide an opportunity for children to give thanks for essential gifts of Light, Water, Seeds, Soil, Animals and New Life.  These modules can be used separately or as a series to help children think about basic needs and what they can do to help families move from poverty to prosperity.“Advent is a great time to reach out to kids because they get excited about the holidays,” said Pamela Penn, Program Officer for Church Engagement.  “The idea of gift giving is on a lot of people’s minds, and it’s easy to tie in lessons about generosity, thankfulness and thoughtfulness about what’s really important.”For those with a coffee drinker on their gift list, Episcopal Relief & Development is offering two Bishops Blend Christmas Boxes through its coffee partner, Pura Vida Create Good.  The Coffee Box includes smooth and rich Bishops Blend Regular Roast, extra-dark Kaldi’s Roast and Café de la Paz.  The Coffee and Chocolate Box delights with Bishops Blend Regular Roast, Bishops Blend Decaf and three bars of Single Origin Guatemalan chocolate.  The boxes are $29 each, and are shipped with a personalized message for the recipient.  A portion of Bishops Blend sales helps to sustain Episcopal Relief & Development’s work worldwide.  Visit www.er-d.org/BishopsBlend to order or learn more.Episcopal Relief & Development is the international relief and development agency of the Episcopal Church and an independent 501(c)(3) organization. The agency takes its mandate from Jesus’ words found in Matthew 25.  Its programs work towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Episcopal Relief & Development works closely with the worldwide Church and ecumenical partners to help rebuild after disasters and to empower local communities to find lasting solutions that fight poverty, hunger and disease, including HIV/AIDS and malaria. Episcopal Relief & Development Advent, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Advent and Christmas resources from Episcopal Relief & Development Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

‘One church in Europe’

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA October 26, 2013 at 7:14 am An interesting idea, but are either of these jurisdictions actually growing? Rector Tampa, FL October 26, 2013 at 12:11 pm Perfectly stated ! October 31, 2013 at 6:51 pm What wonderful news! The overlapping Anglican jurisdictions in Europe are a source of confusion, especially to the numerous visitors to the Continent. Even a common directory, or computer listing someplace would be a help. When I’m on the Continent, I usually stick to the Convocation of American Churches, or the Church of England parishes. (When I’m really stuck, I go to a Roman Catholic church where, lamentably, I can’t receive Communion.) Keep up the momentum and the good work!Now, if only we could lure the Church of England’s Diocese of Europe into this partnership… October 23, 2013 at 9:02 pm I pray that the Holy Spirit will continue to work in the world’s churches for unity! The Body of Christ cannot be separated. It is one; each part has a different function in the body, but they work together for the good of the whole. Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 23, 2013 at 4:25 pm Go! Go! Go! Rector Collierville, TN November 5, 2013 at 1:22 pm I was privileged to work with Old Catholic churches, Convocation churches and the Bishop for the Armed Forces both in 1981-83 while living in Germany and 1992-94 while living in the Netherlands. There were some shared activities then, but I have been praying for this for a long time. I was invited to celebrate the Eucharist in German in Wurzburg in June 1994 for the Old Catholic congregation there. October 26, 2013 at 11:45 am People grow spiritually if they grow at all. Numbers don’t matter. All churches today are losing membership. No one really knows the reason except we live in a modern world of technology that enables people to communicate through technology, not always with one another face to face. Christ’s goal for the “church” is that all will become one as the Father and I are one. Every step towards unity wherever it happens and to whom is a step forward, not backward. That is my belief. October 24, 2013 at 12:11 pm This is true Walt. There are many independent catholic churches in the US claiming to be “Old Catholic” but who have no connection to Utrecht at all. Sadly, some of these groups are very much on the fringe theologically and are trying to claim legitimacy by claiming to be “Old Catholics.” Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI October 24, 2013 at 4:48 pm I lived in Germany 1960-63 and often attended Old Catholic services, met Bishop Steinwachs – a marvelous old apostle – and attended an Old Catholic retreat. In spirit and letter, both these communities seemed virtually identical, although they come out of different experiences, vis a vis the Papacy. I thought we were in full communion then? It’s wonderful to see the two developing closer ecclesiastical ties. We’ve been soul-mates for a long, long time. Comments (16) Rector Shreveport, LA October 27, 2013 at 5:27 pm I have been an Old Catholic Priest since 1977 and a Bishiop since 1979. I am presently pastoring a Lutheran Church in Canada and am looking to get involved with the Church in Europe. I am of Jewish parentage, ergo Jewish born, and would on behalf of the Church get preaching assignments throughout Europe preaching against the Nazi movement that is proliferating throughout Europe. Please answer New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY David Cornell says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC October 24, 2013 at 2:12 am Yes, the Old Catholic churches of the Union of Utrecht already ordain women to the priesthood. The Polish National Catholic Church is no longer a member of the Union of Utrecht, having left it precisely over the issue of its sister churches’ decisions to ordain women (and their general liberalization). Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Joyce Ann Edmondson says: By Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 23, 2013 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ecumenical & Interreligious Fr. Gaylord Hitchcock says: The Rev. Linda Baker Pineo says: Featured Events November 4, 2013 at 10:09 am So when they state Full communion are they meaning that all Old Catholics even the ones in the United states will be in Communion? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Barbara Harris says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Walt Kindergan says: November 12, 2013 at 5:08 am There are also many Independent Catholic jurisdictions in the United States which do not claim to be “Old Catholic” that do, however, possess valid apostolic succession and whose theology is certainly not “on the fringe”. We, in The National Catholic Church of America, are part of the apostolic heritage of the late Bishop Carlos Duarte Costa, former Roman Catholic Ordinary of the Diocese of Botucatu, Brazil who broke with Rome in 1945 and began the establishment of national catholic churches.The NCCA has, from its inception, ordained men and women without the obligation of celibacy, married same sex and opposite sex couples, invited all baptized Christians (including those divorced and remarried) to receive the Body and Blood of Christ at our Eucharistic Table as well as encouraged individuals to make responsible moral decisions in the light of the gospel. We share the same statements of belief (The Apostles Creed and The Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed) share by most churches of apostolic derivation. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img [ooyala code=”93bWg5Zzqa4k_2BmrPimkACgjDMIB5hq” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″][Episcopal News Service] Old Catholics and Episcopalians in Europe have agreed to enter into deeper communion, seeking new ways to collaborate, preparing a common structure, and leading the way towards the ultimate goal of becoming one church in Europe.The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe passed two resolutions during its Oct. 17-20 convention in Rome following a charge delivered by Old Catholic Archbishop Joris Vercammen, in which he encouraged the churches to “overcome our borders” and become “agents of transformation.”One resolution commits the congregations of the convocation to seek to collaborate with their neighboring Old Catholic congregations by developing mutual ministries in worship, program and outreach, and by increasing knowledge and awareness of each other’s traditions.Another resolution supports the bishop-in-charge of the convocation and the archbishop of Utrecht “in their joint efforts to foster and develop our common life in Christ.”The Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht is the Episcopal Church’s longest-standing full communion partner, dating back to the Bonn Agreement of 1931.“The work of full communion is meant for fuller communion than we can envision,” Vercammen told the delegates Oct. 18 at the convocation’s convention. “I hope I am able to seduce you to the freedom for which the Holy Spirit wants to open our minds.”The Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop-in-charge of the convocation, said that Vercammen had planted a seed “for us to pray about who we are together … [and to] determine that we no longer consider ourselves separate churches … We need to think outside ourselves.”Whalon told ENS that there is a strong desire to form “a communion of churches that can have a common witness in continental Europe” and that such a communion would bring the Old Catholic Church and the Episcopal Church “as close as possible to full visible unity without giving up local autonomy of individual jurisdictions.” The deepening of relationships between Old Catholics and Episcopalians, he said, might encourage other Anglican churches and full communion partners in Europe to work more intentionally towards unity.The Church of England’s Diocese in Europe also includes parishes throughout the continent. The Reformed Episcopal Church of Spain and the Lusitanian Church of Portugal are the two other Anglican jurisdictions in Europe.“On the very long term it could be the aim to have only one ecclesiastical structure that would be really both Old Catholic and Episcopal,” Vercammen said. “For the time being we have to organize the steps we have to take in order to realize this long term goal.”“I’m guessing the Old Catholics might help us to become new Episcopalians,” President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings said in her address to the convention, meeting at St. Paul’s Within-the-Walls, an Episcopal church in the center of Rome. She described Vercammen’s proposal as “a radical form of community, a new way to be church, the church we’re called to be.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, after hearing news about Vercammen’s appeal and the convocation’s response, told ENS that she is “deeply grateful for the growing awareness of the possibilities of full communion in Europe, and the increasing commitment to make it a greater reality.“Imagine the missional witness and possibility of a seamless Anglican-Episcopal-Old Catholic-Lutheran Christian community!” she added. “The strong and deepening relationship between Old Catholics and Episcopalians in Europe is the forerunner, which just might lead other parts of the Body of Christ into greater partnership.”Jefferts Schori was a guest of the Old Catholic Church in 2011 when she visited Utrecht and delivered the Quasimodo Lecture, an annual event that explores issues of faith in contemporary society.Vercammen, during his remarks to the convocation’s convention, quoted from that lecture, during which Jefferts Schori said that ecumenism “is basically housekeeping work – cleaning up the household, setting it in order, so that it can be a home … Ecumenical work begins in the baptismal vision of a restored body of Christ, but it cannot stop at any limited version of what God’s body includes. We are here to help the whole, and that’s the future I want to point toward in being catholic beyond borders.”Following that lecture, Vercammen told ENS that more creativity is needed in dealing with overlapping jurisdictions.“We need more concrete initiatives,” such as common searches for church leadership to serve across jurisdictions, he said, “and then we can really build a nucleus of church where Christians of all origins can come together. We have a unique opportunity and it would be a pity if we were not to use it.”The Episcopal Church entered into full communion with the Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht in 1934 on the basis of the Bonn Agreement three years earlier. The Old Catholic Church includes about 200,000 members in several national churches in Europe, located in the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, France and Italy. They separated from the Roman Catholic Church because they could not accept the definition of papal infallibility presented by the first Vatican Council in 1870.The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe serves a culturally diverse demographic of Christians in 20 parishes and missions throughout Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland.In addition to the Old Catholics, the Episcopal Church is in full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Mar Thoma Syrian Church of Malabar, India, the Moravian Church in North America and the Philippine Independent Church.Churches in full communion formally recognize that they share essential doctrines, including Baptism and Eucharist; agree to accept the service of each other’s clergy; and pledge to work together in evangelism and mission. The churches become interdependent while remaining autonomous.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Daniel McKenney says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rt Rev Peter J Sterling says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Father Les Singleton says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anjel Scarborough+ says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ ‘One church in Europe’ Old Catholics, Episcopalians commit to deeper communion Joyce Ann Edmondson says: Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY October 23, 2013 at 10:09 pm What happens in America. In 1946 the Episcopal Church and the National Catholic Polish church had full communion…. that lasted until the Episcopal church had women priests.Are there women priests in the Old Catholic church? could there be??? Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Most Rev. Richard G. Roy, OSJD says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Duane Alexander Miller says: October 23, 2013 at 6:23 pm God’s grace continues to work miracles. May it come to pass in my lifetime, Amen! Rector Martinsville, VA john neir says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 23, 2013 at 7:37 pm I have heard that we are NOT in full communion with the Old Catholics in the United States because they are affiliated with the Polish National Catholic Church and have withdrawn from the Union of Utrecht. Is that true? I think many do not know this. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tony Price says: David L. Veal says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Anglican Communion women to attend U.N. Commission

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Anglican Communion News Service] Women from 18 provinces of the Anglican Communion are converging on New York to take part collectively in the annual session of the U.N.’s Commission on the Status of Women.On Monday, March 10, the United Nations will launch the 58th session of the commission, which this year has the theme of Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls.Anglicans and Episcopalians were selected by their primates to attend on behalf of their provinces and will be monitoring plenary sessions and attending parallel events (panels and meetings) on topics that all speak to that theme.After the commission concludes, the women will be returning to brief their provinces on the discussions and outcomes from the event.The Anglican Communion Office at the United Nations is hosting several panels and events, including a presentation by Lakshmi Puri, assistant secretary general of the United Nations and deputy executive director of U.N. women. She will be presenting on The Beijing Platform for Action and the global development agenda – from the Millennium Development Goals to the Post-2015 development agenda.Anglican Louisa Mojela, founder and group chief executive officer of women’s investment portfolio holdings limited, based in South Africa, will be presenting on Enhancing women’s investment opportunities in Africa and the world.Mojela will also be joining Ayra Inderyas, secretary of the women desk, Diocese of Lahore, Church of Pakistan; Ariella Rojhani, senior advocacy manager of the NCD Alliance; and Ann M. Starrs, president of Family Care International; on a panel considering Accelerating access, integrating services, focusing on women: the challenges of the Millennium Development Goals, sustainable development goals, low and middle income countries, and non-communicable diseases. The panel will be moderated by global public health expert Lucille B. Pilling, who is the Episcopal Church’s delegate at UNCSW58.The Anglican Communion attendees will also have the opportunity to hear a presentation at the Episcopal Church Center by 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee – a Liberian peace activist, trained social worker, public speaker, and women’s rights advocate. She is also founder and current president of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa.The women attending on behalf of the Anglican Communion are from Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Central Africa, Congo, England, Hong Kong, Indian Ocean, Japan, Korea, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Rwanda, Scotland, South Africa and the United States. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Women’s Ministry Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska UNCSW, Anglican Communion women to attend U.N. Commission Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staffPosted Mar 5, 2014 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

DC church mixes spoken word and social justice with ‘Prophetic…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Faith & Politics, Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Social Media Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Egan MillardPosted Jul 16, 2019 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK DC church mixes spoken word and social justice with ‘Prophetic Poetry Slam’ Homelessness. Incarceration. Black Lives Matter. Climate change. The mic was open to the community, and they had a lot to say. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC LaTonya Merritt performs at All Souls Episcopal Church’s Prophetic Poetry Slam in Washington, D.C., on July 13, 2019. Photo: Egan Millard/ENS[Episcopal News Service ­­– Washington, D.C.] The litany that could be heard at All Souls Episcopal Church on the evening of July 13 was an unfamiliar one.“Homeless?” came the call.“Not hopeless,” the people responded.“God?”“Keep me focused.”This wasn’t a liturgical service, and the woman on the stage in the church basement wasn’t a priest. Her name was LaTonya Merritt, and she was a performer at the church’s first Prophetic Poetry Slam.“Dirty clothes, smelling bad / sleeping on the streets, digging in the trash can for food / that’s all you see,” she recited from memory. “How ’bout: I have a job, sleep in my vehicle. / That homeless person / is me.”With commanding confidence, she interspersed the story of her journey out of homelessness with that same call-and-response she’d taught the audience at the beginning of the poem, echoing the theme of relying on God in desperate times.This event, unlike most poetry slams, wasn’t a competition; no judges assigned scores to the 10 performers. It did, however, feature the passionate, socially conscious spoken-word poetry that slams are known for, with a special focus on spirituality.All Souls has been hosting monthly poetry nights since 2018. Photo: Egan Millard/ENSAll Souls is focusing on the intersection of faith, art and social justice as a way to reach out to the surrounding community. Tucked into the lush Woodley Park neighborhood – which borders both the establishment influence of Kalorama and the diverse immigrant enclave of Adams Morgan – the church is something of an intersection itself.“This is a part of the outreach that we are doing to the broader community,” said Brian Smith, the church’s Christian formation leader. “We’ve really made a concerted effort to reach out to our neighborhood in general and bring people into church for different reasons.”Last year, Smith started a monthly poetry night “to explore the art of poetry as a devotional spiritual practice.”“All Souls has a tradition of religion and the arts,” Smith said. “There have been other poetry groups that met here in the past, so we’re kind of carrying that on.”Smith said that the intimate monthly gathering succeeded in bringing in people “who would never have gone to church” otherwise.“We took a summer hiatus to regroup and plan out the next program year,” Smith said, “but then we realized, we have to do something this summer. It was the rector’s idea to do a poetry slam. … We wanted to infuse a little bit more energy into the experience of poetry for people who may or may not be familiar with the slam style.”So where does the “prophetic” element come in?“It’s a very prophetic moment we’re experiencing right now,” Smith explained. “People are speaking out; they’re very passionate.”And though the topics – particularly the racist rhetoric embraced by President Donald Trump and his administration’s hostility to immigrants – may be new, the Christian response isn’t.“Return to the law, return to love. … That’s what the prophetic tradition is about, in a way: new expressions of old truths,” Smith said.So the poetry slam, with its tradition of speaking truth to power, seemed like the perfect way to harness the passion of a community that increasingly feels the need to speak out against injustice. That hasn’t always been easy for All Souls, said the Rev. Jadon Hartsuff, who has served as rector since 2016.“We are here in Washington, D.C., we are surrounded by political issues, and we are a parish that is full of people who work in government … so this has long been a church that has very intentionally stayed clear of hot-button political or social justice issues just because people have wanted church to be a respite,” Hartsuff said.Ironically, that attitude came about in part because All Souls was an early pioneer in one particular hot-button issue: accepting queer parishioners.A custom-made sign greets visitors at the door of All Souls. Photo: Egan Millard/ENS“All Souls was the first church to have an openly gay rector in this region. So the primary issue that the church felt like it was engaging was the issue of welcome to the LGBT community,” Hartsuff said. “So with that being its flagship issue, it wanted to avoid all the other issues that might divide people who were otherwise being united around that issue, because it ended up being a place where gay men and women from very different political backgrounds came together.”But by 2016, the situation had changed, with LGBTQ people gaining widespread acceptance in The Episcopal Church and Trump upending the political and moral landscape of America.“In the last few years, there’s been an increasingly large minority of people here who have been interested in some kind of more active, more pronounced engagement of social justice,” Hartsuff said. This led to a monthly multi-parish social justice forum, and the July 13 Prophetic Poetry Slam was intended to forge a connection between that and the monthly poetry series.“We’re trying to test the waters and see what happens,” Smith said before the event.What happened was a mix of personal and political, painful and healing. With rhymes ringing off the walls, the first poet poured out her anguish over her sister’s death, wondering what God’s purpose could be.Laurel Blaydes sang a cappella of the struggle to persevere in the face of disillusionment:“I can see by the look in your eye / that you feel like your leaders mislead you / and you’re tired of delusions and lies / But I can also see / that you didn’t stop there / You have moved to take the vision of the future / way beyond despair,” she sang.Laurel Blaydes gets ready to sing at All Souls Episcopal Church’s Prophetic Poetry Slam. Photo: Egan Millard/ENSMerritt, in addition to sharing her story of homelessness, performed a piece that pointed out the ironic dichotomies in American society: poverty and conspicuous consumption, homelessness and gentrification, “Black Lives Matter” and “All Lives Matter.”Other performers spoke of feeling judged in church and the guilt of judging others, struggles with learning disabilities and incarceration, and the gap between what Jesus left unsaid and what he did say. Inspired by the trending Twitter hashtag #thingsJesusneversaid, one poet wondered how anyone familiar with the Gospels could be confused about how Jesus would react to fossil fuel emissions polluting the air and jeopardizing the survival of humanity. Jesus, he said, never talked about oil, “never spoke of dinosaurs, giant lizards / sinking into the rocks, becoming a liquor for our society. … He didn’t have to.”vEnessa Acham reads Joy Harjo’s “Ah, Ah.” Photo: Egan Millard/ENSNot everyone performed their own work. vEnessa Acham read “Ah, Ah” by newly inaugurated U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American to hold the post. And Calvin Zon read a series of revolutionary poems by Robert Burns, Pablo Neruda and Bertolt Brecht, ending with Langston Hughes’ “Let America Be America Again.”The performers were evenly split between regular parishioners and people from outside the parish. That’s because All Souls invested in highly targeted Facebook ads to advertise the slam.“We have an active two-week-long Facebook ad for this event that is focused on young adults who have expressed on their Facebook profile that they have an interest in either poetry or social justice,” Hartsuff said.Those ads are funded by a grant from the Lilly Endowment administered through nearby Wesley Theological Seminary’s Innovation Hub. The program aims to connect activist millennials in Washington with local churches through engaging, collaborative projects. The Innovation Hub provides training, research and support, in addition to the grant funds.For Hartsuff, the effort is as much about getting a new image of the church out there as it is about the event itself.Myke Gregoree performs an original piece. Photo: Egan Millard/ENS“We have been trying to create and present different kinds of events that … 20-somethings who don’t go to church might see and be surprised that a church was offering,” Hartsuff said. “And even if they didn’t come to it, it would begin to shift their understanding of what our church and maybe the church at large is doing,” Hartsuff said.The investment in Facebook ads paid off. Myke Gregoree, who hadn’t been to All Souls before, said he came across the event on Facebook and “it seemed like it was up my alley. … It definitely was the name that spoke out to me and it made me feel welcome.”Merritt, also a first-time visitor to All Souls, had the same experience while scrolling through Facebook.“I was like, ‘OK, that looks like something interesting,’” she said.Both Merritt and Gregoree expressed interest in coming back when the regular monthly poetry nights return. And most people lingered long after the slam ended, talking over wine and snacks about the power of catharsis. There were knowing nods, exchanges of email addresses, and a sense that All Souls was a little bigger than it had been just a few hours earlier.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

New Jersey’s Episcopal bishops issue joint pastoral letter on COVID-19’s…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted May 7, 2020 [Dioceses of Newark and New Jersey] The Rt. Rev. Carlye J. Hughes, bishop of Newark, and the Rt. Rev. William H. Stokes, bishop of New Jersey, have issued a joint pastoral letter addressing public policies that fail to adequately address the disparate impact the COVID-19 virus is having on black and brown people, immigrants and the imprisoned.“It is inarguable that much of the damage and destruction of the novel coronavirus is the result of a capricious force of nature beyond human control and culpability,” the bishops wrote in a joint pastoral letter issued May 7. “However, it must also be recognized and acknowledged that, as with previous national and health disasters, there is indisputable evidence that this disaster has exacted greater human costs and a higher death rate on black and brown persons in the United States than on the predominant white culture. …“This predictable pattern is the tragic result of deeply entrenched systemic and structural injustices, especially the injustice of systemic racism, that have plagued this nation since its inception. Ongoing, long-term, often deliberate policies in our nation and in the state of New Jersey targeting persons of color have resulted in huge racial inequalities and disparities across major areas: education, housing, economic opportunity, net wealth and income. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the effects of all of these.”The bishops go on to address how the evil of mass incarceration has been underscored by the spread of the virus:“New Jersey has among the highest incarceration rates in the nation and also among the highest levels of racial disparity of those incarcerated,” the bishops write. “Unjust sentencing requirements and unsafe conditions in our nation’s jails and prisons, including those in New Jersey, make incarcerated persons, as well as those who guard them or otherwise work in prisons, ‘sitting ducks’ for the COVID-19 virus.”To address this, Hughes and Stokes call for the following public actions:Stopping or severely curbing the arrest and incarceration rate of persons for low-level offenses;Releasing those in prison who are vulnerable to COVID-19 due to age or health conditions and who statistically represent a low risk of recidivism.“We urge the people of our two dioceses to contact our governor and state officials and urge them to support these life-saving steps,” the bishops write.The health risks of incarceration extend to undocumented immigrants, detained and at risk for deportation, and the letter calls for public policy shifts to address the situation. In particular, the bishops draw attention to changes made by the Trump administration to the so-called “public charge rule,” which allows the government to exclude immigrants it fears will place a “burden” on cash assistance programs like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).“We feel strongly that the ‘public charge rule,’ which the Supreme Court upheld on April 24, 2020, is both draconian and cruel and should not be implemented,” they write.“The coronavirus pandemic is a threat to human beings, but, as is so often the case with crises, it is an opportunity as well. This pandemic affords us a chance to discover our deeper humanity and invites us to live into Christ’s most urgent command: ‘Love one another’ (John 13:34).”Pastoral Letter in EnglishCarta pastoral en español Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Jersey’s Episcopal bishops issue joint pastoral letter on COVID-19’s disparate impact on persons of color Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

In case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review

first_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 6 stories that shaped Apopka’s news weekBlue Darters land in Central Florida’s top 20Orange County rolls out a bear-resistant garbage canSchool Board votes unanimously to declare HB 7069 unconstitutional2 Apopkans chosen for political leadership instituteUpdating Breaking News: Apopka game cancelled; no date set for completionUpdating breaking news: Makayla Fisher found, suspect in custody You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleWhere is God in Hurricane Harvey?Next articleRecall Alert: Southeastern Grocers Issues Voluntary Recall Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Breaking News: APD searching for Missing Apopka man

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSApopka Police DepartmentBreaking NewsMissing Person Previous articleDo You Believe These 7 Heart Health Myths?Next articleVote for Mayor, Seat #1, and Seat #2 in The Apopka Voice’s third online election poll Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 From the Apopka Police DepartmentThe Apopka Police Department is seeking the public’s help in locating a missing man from the Apopka Area. Harry Holmes, age 61, was last seen by Apopka Retirement Center Staff at 750 South Alabama Avenue on February 10th at approximately 8:30 p.m.Harry Holmes is considered disabled and has difficulty taking care of himself without assistance. Harry Holmes is also diagnosed Schizophrenic and needs medication on a daily basis.Harry HolmesHarry Holmes is described as a black male with grey hair, 5’11”, weighing 160 pounds. He was last seen wearing a blue t-shirt with the word “Hawaii” written across the chest and yellow or off-white shorts.Anyone with information is urged to contact the Apopka Police Department (407-703-1757) or their local law enforcement agency.The Apopka Police Department is a full-service, accredited police agency with more than 150 employees including 108 sworn officers and staff. The Apopka Police Department supports the Crimeline program to aid in investigations and to foster safe and anonymous tips that lead to criminal arrests.You can help with these local cases – if you have relevant information, please call (800) 423-TIPS, go to www.crimeline.org, or e-mail [email protected] Apopka bulletins can be found at the APD website (www.apopkapolice.com); click on “Crimeline”.last_img read more