Top stories NASAs carbon monitoring cuts a cancer drug flop and the

first_img Email (Left to right): © JACQUES JANGOUX/SCIENCE SOURCE; STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE SOURCE; DAVID MCLAIN Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Last month, the surprising failure of a large clinical trial of a promising cancer immunotherapy drug quickly reverberated across the pharmaceutical industry. Three companies have canceled, suspended, or downsized 12 other phase III trials of the compound, epacadostat, or two similar drugs, together slated to enroll more than 5000 patients with a variety of advanced cancers. The drugs “moved to randomized clinical trials too fast,” says neuroimmunologist Michael Platten of the University of Heidelberg in Germany. Now, we realize the effect of the drugs is “still a black box,” he says.Salmon spawn fierce debate over protecting endangered species, thanks to a single geneIn 2017, a California tribe asked the U.S. government to declare a spring run of Chinook, or king, salmon endangered—and to protect it separately from genetically similar fish that migrate up the same river in the fall. The tribe’s argument hinges on recent genomic studies, which found that a single gene appears to control whether Chinook salmon, and another related species, migrate upriver before or after reaching sexual maturity. The research has sparked a fierce debate. At its heart: whether a single gene should be enough to qualify a population for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.One of the Milky Way’s fastest stars is an invader from another galaxyIn April, the collaboration behind the European Space Agency’s Gaia satellite released a data set containing the motions, and much more, for 1.3 billion stars. Researchers quickly sprang into action to look at the data. Last week, one group reported the discovery of three white dwarfs—the dying embers of sunlike stars—hurtling through the galaxy at thousands of kilometers per second, perhaps flung out from supernovae explosions. Another group reported more than two dozen fast-moving stars, some apparently kicked out by our galaxy’s central black hole. The flood of discoveries has sent astronomers racing to their telescopes to check and classify the swift objects.Tourism is four times worse for the planet than previously believedGoing on vacation may be fun for you, but it’s not great for Earth. The carbon footprint of global tourism is about four times larger than previously recognized, and it accounts for about one-twelfth of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, a new study suggests. Previous analyses typically tallied only carbon dioxide emissions due to air travel. But the new study also includes emissions of carbon dioxide and other planet-warming gases due to the construction and maintenance of infrastructure such as hotels and airports, as well as emissions associated with tourists’ purchases of food, beverages, and souvenirs. Top stories: NASA’s carbon monitoring cuts, a cancer drug flop, and the fight over one salmon gene Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Trump White House quietly cancels NASA research verifying greenhouse gas cutsYou can’t manage what you don’t measure. The adage is especially relevant for climate-warming greenhouse gases, which are crucial to manage—and challenging to measure. In recent years, satellite and aircraft instruments have begun monitoring carbon dioxide and methane remotely, and NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System has helped stitch together observations of sources and sinks into high-resolution models of the planet’s flows of carbon. Now, President Donald Trump’s administration has quietly killed the program, jeopardizing plans to verify the national emission cuts agreed to in the Paris climate accords.A promising new cancer drug has hit a major setback, raising questions about whether the field is moving too fast By Katie LanginMay. 11, 2018 , 5:25 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img

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