Rugby World – February 2014 edition contents

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dan Lydiate – Deep in the heart of Paris, Wales’ destructive flanker has started a new life. We meet him there Who will replace Brian O’Driscoll? – We look at the men vying to take over from Ireland’s fabled greatRichie Gray – We also jet out to see why Scotland’s shaggy-haired lock loves the quiet life in CastresBig in 2013: Ben Smith and Richie McCawReview of the Year – Remember that scandalous red card? Forget about that impressive points tally? Well, we’ve gone over all the big news and sensational events of 2013 in our reviewRichie McCaw – The Kiwi captain sits down and faces a barrage of questions from us and you, the readersHSBC Sevens series in Dubai – We head for the UAE to see what’s happening at one of the world’s most jumping sevens events – accompanied by none other than Will Greenwood2014 Wish List – Stephen Jones tells us everything he is hoping for in the upcoming year of rugby, from England coming back stronger to club changes in WalesDave Ewers – Meet Exeter Chiefs’ Zimbabwean powerhouse at the back of the scrumAdvice sectionPro insight – Gregor Townsend on counter-attackFitness – Begin the new year the right wayPro playbook – Making use of scrum positionsMini rugby – How to play Stick in the MudRegularsRugby focus – All the news from the clubs, schools and women’s circuitsEssentials – The latest books and products Huge names: Brian O’Driscoll, Richie Gray, Dan Lydiate and England captain Chris Robshaw in our latest editionYOU may already be into you New Year, New Me campaign but you can always rely on Rugby World. In the new issue we look back at the year that was 2013, its successes and its big changes while also looking forward to all the delights 2014 can bring.We listen out for Robshaw’s roar as the England captain talks us through his battle to prove the doubters wrong, debate who should take over from Brian O’Driscoll as Ireland’s outside centre when he finally hangs up the boots this year and talk to two Lions who have turned their lives upside down by moving to France – Wales and Racing Metro flanker Dan Lydiate and Scotland and Castres lock Richie Gray. Then there is an exclusive chat with Richie McCaw, with the All Blacks legend answering your questions.Tootling off down memory lane, Gavin Mortimer runs us through his review of the year for 2013 – with all the Lions glory and silly shenanigans – while Stephen Jones gives us his serious (and some not so serious) wishes for the year ahead.This is a list of contents – and you can find out where to buy your copy here or download our free magazine finder app here. Plus, if you have an iPad, download the digital edition here or find out about our android version here.SidelinesWe pick out the biggest fixtures of 2014 coming up, predict who will make the last eight of the Heineken Cup, meet Leicester Tigers new wheelchair rugby team, give you details on buying World Cup 2015 tickets, 30 Minutes withOnce a Shark: Brad Barritt during his time in South AfricaLeicester and England hooker Tom Youngs and more.ColumnistsPaul Wallace – Why are the Irish provinces thriving in Europe?Brad Barritt – Saracens’ centre previews a glamour-tie with South Africa’s SharksJonathan Davies – Welsh rugby’s civil warSpotlightsJared Payne – Ireland’s answer? The Ulster back speaksLiam Williams – The larger-than-like full-back lets us into his mindRoss Rennie – Scotland’s talented back-rower is back on the sceneSamu Manoa – The hard-hitting Saint tells us how his Grandma knocked him into lineFeaturesChris Robshaw – It has been a painfully tough year for the England captain, but he has come through it all during the Rugby Championship match between South Africa Springboks and the New Zealand All Blacks at Ellis Park on October 5, 2013 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Uncovered – Recent retiree Dan HipkissTour Tale – Masking disappointment on tourlast_img read more

Super 15 analysis: Handre Pollard to turn 21 in some style

first_imgSouth African sensation Handre Pollard turns 21 on Wednesday and celebrated with a stunning performance this weekend. We analyse the efforts of the Bulls fly-half. Reaching the coveted milestone of 50 Tests in Paris just over a week ago, George North underlined a trend of modern rugby. Barring the odd anomaly such as Keven Mealamu or Nick Easter, it is truly a game for young men.At 22 years and 321 days old, North, the Wales and Lions wing became the freshest face to land a half-century of internationals. It is easy to forget his debut arrived at the tender age of 18 back in November 2010.Historically, the southern hemisphere superpowers have been more willing to blood their most promising youths. Think South Africa‘s Eben Etzebeth or Wallabies James O’Connor and Liam Gill in recent times. But Stuart Lancaster is a big advocate of fast-tracking too, as a backline featuring George Ford, Anthony Watson and Jack Nowell – a trio of 21 year-olds – demonstrates.The moral of this story is that sometimes talent is simply impossible to ignore. Reigning World Young Player of the Year Handre Pollard is the flagbearer for this category.Already the proud owner of nine Springbok caps including a two-try outing to beat New Zealand last September, the prodigious, precocious fly-half celebrates his 21st birthday on Wednesday. By happy coincidence, he produced a phenomenal all-round performance in a 39-20 victory for the Bulls over the Cheetahs on Saturday.A full house of a try, five penalties, three conversions and a drop-goal comprised his 29-point haul, while there was also an assist, some sturdy defensive work and canny game management. Here is a run-down of Pollard’s display.Defence: organisational authorityAt six foot, two inches tall and weighing 96 kilograms, you would not expect Pollard to shirk much in the way of collisions. Then, given his relative inexperience, he might be forgiven for taking a back seat in terms of directing defensive patterns. Watch this sequence from the first half, and think again:A muscular challenge on Boom Prinsloo stalls the Cheetahs’ momentum comprehensively. It was one of eight tackles Pollard made in the match, without missing one.More impressive though, is the communication. At the previous ruck, Pollard identifies that the Bulls are short on numbers, and gestures in a bid to bring his forwards over to the openside:The response is swift. Obeying their conductor, locks Victor Matfield and Jacques du Plessis skirt around to fill in around the fringes either side of openside flanker Pieter Labuschagne, ensuring the Cheetahs are well marked:The authority and conviction Pollard shows here were mirrored when the Bulls had possession.Exit strategy: thumping downfieldDecisiveness and accurate execution are important in every aspect of a number ten’s armoury, not least when attempting to assert territorial control at a restart. Pollard’s siege-gun right boot – which we will get onto in more detail later – gave the Cheetahs no scope to pressurise or spoil.Here are two examples, both from the second half. One clearance sails from right to left……the other from left to right:Both passed the halfway line and landed in the stands, nullifying any hope of a quick lineout and thoroughly disheartening the Cheetahs.Back-field coverageWith aerial exchanges so prominent these days, a significant part of the fly-half’s role comes away from the gain-line. The Cheetahs boast Willie Le Roux among their ranks, an exceptional full-back who sniffs out space so well, so guarding the back-field was even more crucial on Saturday.This bout of kick-tennis gave evidence of Pollard’s positional awareness:It is worth isolating the moment Francois Hougaard launches his counter and looks to chip over the line of Cheetahs chasers. Notice how Pollard holds his ground, covering the area left empty as Hougaard heads forward:Sure enough, as Le Roux gathers and sends the ball back, Pollard is in a perfect place to collect and assess his options:Seeing tight forwards ahead of him, Pollard carries into midfield, beating second-row Carl Wegner with a step off his right foot and setting up a target for his support runners:Goal-kicking: downright deadlyEven allowing for the fact that Bloemfontein is 1,400 metres above sea level, meaning kicks travel for miles through the thinner air, Pollard hit the ball brilliantly off the tee.Eight successful strikes from eight attempts represented his final return, and some of them were superb. This touchline conversion of Bjorn Basson‘s score (again, more detail shortly) was excellent:Likewise, this 51-metre three-pointer:Such range is a fantastic weapon, not just as a means of ticking the scoreboard over, but also because the opposition know it is a huge risk to concede a penalty anywhere inside their own half. It is a claustrophobic feeling. Phase-play: distribution and drop-goalsStanding at first-receiver is all about selecting options. In terms of passing, timing is the fundamental skill. Sometimes a delayed release will get the job done, on other occasions it is best to shift early in order to ‘feed the speed’ of those wider out.Pollard does exactly the latter in this instance, from another restart return. His wide pass sets a sweeping movement away and full-back Jessie Kriel can make ground close to the left touchline:On the half-hour, the Bulls got in behind the Cheetahs on the back of a barnstorming charge run from hooker Adriaan Strauss. Following up, Pollard again opted to release his pass early in order to make full use of the width available.As Basson went over, his decision was justified:The assist from JJ Engelbrecht is a fine one, but Pollard’s strong, flat ball to Matfield is what injects pace into the attack, forcing the veteran lock to speed onto an outside arc and manufacture a three-on-two:With around 15 minutes to go and the Bulls leading 29-20, Pollard helped take the sting out of a Cheetahs comeback by directing a fluent attack that ended in a well-struck drop-goal.It started as the visitors gleaned a penalty advantage and probed in the outside channel:As the Bulls worked their way up to just outside the 22, Pollard stepped back into the pocket. His forwards come around the corner to hold the Cheetahs defence……but Pollard takes Rudy Paige‘s pass and sends the drop-goal through the middle of the posts:The reverse angle offers a better idea of how true the contact is:This entire sequence demonstrates Pollard’s management of the cadence of this encounter. He commanded its cut and thrust.Gain-line threatAt the beginning and end of the game, Pollard made two interventions directly leading to tries. First, this show-and-go saw him power over with only 10 minutes gone:Examining Pollard prior to receiving Paige’s pass is telling. As the Bulls forwards recycle, he is scanning the defensive line in front of him, searching for potential openings:From behind the posts, we can see the area Pollard attacks, exploiting a mismatch against the slower Wegner. Speeding onto the second-row’s outside, he takes advantage of a weaker arm tackle to dive over:Far later in the contest, in the dying ten minutes in fact, Pollard received the ball in a similar position. Again a try resulted, although this time it came about in a different manner:Undoubtedly aware of Pollard’s ability to crash through himself, Cheetahs replacement centre Willie du Plessis closes off ever so slightly in an attempt – perhaps even a subconscious one – to cover his fly-half Joe Pietersen:The angle of du Plessis’ body makes it difficult to turn and stop the hard line of Jan Serfontein as the Bulls centre steams onto Pollard’s pass: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Cannon: Handre Pollard smashes a punt downfield Pollard is now up to 72 points from four Super 15 appearances this campaign, leading an inexperienced Bulls outfit to two wins. His ability to vary things and produce pieces of magic adds a touch of devil to increasing maturity.Maintain this form, and he is sure to be Heyneke Meyer’s man for the World Cup and way, way beyond.last_img read more

Racing 92 are only halfway through a long and troubled season

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS When Racing returned from Barcelona with the Bouclier de Brennus in June, they were greeted by 1,500 diehard supporters. In contrast more than 50,000 fans welcomed Toulon home when they won the Top 14 title in 2014, similar to the massed ranks of the Yellow Army who brought Clermont to a standstill in 2010 to honour their boys’ first title.With Stade Francais also enduring a torrid season, on and off the pitch, these are troubling times for the capital’s two clubs. Bayonne and Biarritz never managed to co-exist in the top flight, and one wonders how long Stade and Racing are going to keep balancing the books in a city that traditionally prefers more cerebral pursuits. Further to run: So’otala Fa’aso’o of Racing 92 attacks Leicester Allied to that was the absence of some key players in Goosen, the tireless flanker Bernard Le Roux (a long-term injury casualty) and second row Luke Charteris (now at Bath), not to mention the poor form of Dan Carter. “We have not been humble,” said Lorenzetti recently, before tearing a strip of some of his star names for their questionable effort. “When we see the number of matches they’ve played, it’s just not right that they should be tired.”Lift-off: against Munster’s lineoutIn the players’ defence, it must be hard to get up for some games at the Stade Yves-Manoir. It’s a dump. A historical dump, but at a dump, all the same. The club was supposed to move this month to their spanking new location, Arena 92, but the project fell behind schedule and won’t be inaugurated until September. The fear now for Lorenzetti is: will he fill it? Their average gate this season has fallen 12.8% to 8,863, and yet next season they’ll need to find 32,000 bums to put on seats. “A Season in Hell” was Midi Olympique’s headline at the start of this month, and few at Racing 92 would contradict that curt assessment. And that was written before the humiliation of losing 32-7 at home to Munster, and the announcement that the cortisone affair was not yet over with France’s Anti-Doping Agency summoning Racing to their HQ to explain themselves.That hullabaloo, which erupted in early October,  was the first blow to hit the Top 14 champions this season. There have been a few since but there’s a sense that the club, which prides itself on its sophisticated image, has never fully recovered from having the names of Dan Carter, Juan Imhoff and Joe Rokocoko dragged through the mud. The trio were cleared of any wrongdoing at a FFR hearing, the corticosteroids detected in their bodies following last season’s Top 14 final satisfactorily explained.Troubled ten: Dan Carter has been scrutinisedNonetheless, the French press went to town and it clearly upset and unsettled the squad. Little did we know at the time but it was a squad already destabilised by the attitude of Johan Goosen, the gifted South African who last season was voted the Top 14 Player of the Year. His subsequent retirement to work at a stud farm in South Africa – for the time being, at least – was another body blow to a club already struggling to find a rhythm to its season.At least Racing broke its European duck on Saturday, thrashing Leicester 34-3 ( a stroke of luck that they played a side who are enduring a hellish season of their own), but they must conclude their wretched Champions Cup campaign with a trip to Munster. Talk about a hiding to nothing. Coach Laurent Labit didn’t even try to pretend the Thomond Park match mattered when he declared on Saturday: “It’s going to be a new season that starts for us at Lyon”Set-piece tussle: Yannick Nyanga competes in the lineoutRacing, currently ninth in the Top 14 table, play Lyon on Saturday week in the Top 14, and then have matches against Brive and Grenoble. That’s not a bad hat-trick of matches for a team looking to build momentum in the second half of the season, and how they need a winning streak. Club president Jacky Lorenzetti gave Labit and his co-coach, Laurent Travers, the proverbial vote of confidence at the weekend, but it’s hard to conceive how they would keep their jobs if Racing don’t reach the play-offs.So how did it get to this, that the club who last season won their domestic title and reached the final of the Champions Cup, should have come off the rails so quickly? Part of the problem was that the squad, having won the title on that glorious night in Barcelona on June 24, didn’t report back to duty until July 30,  two, three or in some cases, four weeks after their rivals began their pre-season training. Even when the season began it was evident that some of the squad were still mentally on holiday. They scraped a few victories at home, but it wasn’t until the end of October that they beat Bayonne 16-3 to record their first win on the road.last_img read more

Scotland’s Stuart Hogg drops ball over the line against Ireland

first_img— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 1, 2020Sexton showed more from his box of tricks later in the half with a clever 22 dropout. Rather than kick long, he went cross-field to Jacob Stockdale and the winger broke in the Scotland half.A few phases later, Scotland were penalised for offside and Sexton slotted the three points to give Ireland a 10-6 half-time lead.Watch the dropout here…All Scotland’s points came from the boot of Adam Hastings. They had try-scoring chances and stretched Ireland with their quick offloading and recycling, but too many times those chances were squandered as they entered the hosts’ 22.As well as the error from Hogg, they had a great chance in the closing minutes after an initial break from Stuart McInally. Numerous carries from the forwards took Scotland close to the line but yet again they couldn’t find their way over and Ireland were eventually able to clear after winning a penalty at the breakdown. They couldn’t find that clinical edge.The risk was there from Hogg & Co but no reward. Their ambition and inventiveness is illustrated in this move shortly before half-time, but they couldn’t make it across the whitewash… Scotland’s Stuart Hogg drops ball over the line against IrelandJohnny Sexton and Stuart Hogg had contrasting fortunes as they took on the captaincy roles for their countries in the opening round of the 2020 Six Nations.Although there was only one try scored over the course of the 80 minutes at the Aviva Stadium, it was an entertaining game between Ireland and Scotland, with the hosts eventually winning 19-12. The two skippers will reflect on the match with very mixed emotions, though.Hogg had asked Gregor Townsend for the opportunity to lead Scotland and his side came out with an attack-minded game plan in Dublin. However, when given a golden opportunity to score a second-half try Hogg dropped the ball over the line.Hogg was presented with the chance of an easy run-in to the corner from a few metres out after great build-up work from Scotland but he couldn’t keep hold of the ball, as a quick check with the TMO showed… Even the very best make mistakes… You had to feel for Stuart Hogg after this one#IREvSCO #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/cqmw0ZHxVa— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 1, 2020The match could have been very different had Hogg grounded that ball. Instead he will be left to rue the missed opportunity.Reflecting on the incident, Hogg said: “Schoolboy error. But I can’t change what happened, I just need to get on with it. I’ve apologised to the boys.“I’m bitterly disappointed to drop the ball over the line. We got ourselves in a good position, after the forwards’ hard work and effort I’m disappointed I couldn’t finish it off.”In contrast, Ireland captain Sexton scored all of his side’s points in this opening victory, with a converted try and four penalties.The fly-half glided through Scotland’s defence to score the only try of the game after ten minutes. The forwards had retained possession well from a lineout, building pressure with strong carries as they took play across the field. When they came back to the left Conor Murray fired a pinpoint pass to his long-time half-back partner Sexton and the space opened up in front of him to touch down.Watch the try here… Ruled out: Scotland captain Stuart Hogg loses control of the ball as he attempts to score a try (Getty Images) The Scotland captain squanders golden opportunity in Six Nations defeat by Ireland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Intercepts, offloads, sidesteps, 25-yard kick passes – this @Scotlandteam attack has it all!#IREvSCO #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/ny2HH7UC44— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 1, 2020“We’ve talked about expressing ourselves and having fun,” said Hogg. “We stuck to our detail in attack and stood firm in defence, we played with confidence and ambition. We’re disappointed not to come away with a positive result but we feel we’re in a good place and it’s about kicking on and learning from today, so we’re better come next Saturday.“We’ve talked about our conversion rate in attack, getting to the 22 and coming away with points. Unfortunately we came up short there. We got into good situations and should have finished them off. Credit to Ireland’s defence; they were a nightmare for us at the breakdown.”Improve their execution and they will likely trouble England’s defence next weekend. The March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine – a Six Nations special – is on sale now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Slick as you [email protected] scores @IrishRugby’s first try of the Championship with a beuatifully executed play #IREvSCO #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/YBhf06kzpslast_img read more

Six Nations Ireland v France preview

first_img Six Nations Ireland v France previewIreland could not have shown more heart as they went down swinging against Wales last week. However, they desperately need strong leadership as they host France on this Six Nations Sunday.Neither Johnny Sexton or James Ryan have been cleared to take part after undergoing return to play protocols following brain injuries against Wales. Peter O’Mahony is banned after a red-card worthy shocker in Cardiff. And Conor Murray is out too.So as Ireland set out on a collision course with much-vaunted France and their red-hot talents, the hosts must steal themselves.Related: Aaron Smith hails Antoine Dupont as world’s bestUp steps Iain Henderson to skipper the side.And while lineout perfection is a must for Henderson’s horde this weekend, Ireland’s big personalities must learn to make the most of whatever situation they find themselves in. They cannot have any hangovers from last week, either. Because fly-half Billy Burns will be under an intense glare as he tries to navigate his side around their 80-minute journey – he cannot flinch at all with flashbacks of last week’s horror stab at touch.Having played the majority of the match with 14 men following O’Mahony’s 14th-minute red card for dangerous play, Ireland were somehow setting the stage for one of this tournament’s greatest ever comebacks. At the death, they had a penalty, enough time for a final lineout. But substitute fly-half Burns tried to bite off too much and overdid his kick as he aimed for the 5m-line. No lineout; no comeback.It must have felt like Ireland walked under umpteen ladders on the way to the Principality Stadium last week, stepping on black cats all the way.Meanwhile, everything was coming off for France against Italy. Blind, over-the-shoulder offloads from Antoine Dupont were not only setting up tries, but they were expected. The scrum-half was in bullying form, terrifying Italy almost at will. The whole French attack felt fluent throughout the contest.Just this week, former England and Lions prop Alex Corbisiero said on NBC in the States: “If France win (this) game then I’m pretty confident that they will go on and win the tournament – that’s how big a game it is.”The enemy is at the gates for Ireland. They need leaders to stride out and defend their honour. There is a slide to arrest and pride to resuscitate. No wheezing or windmilling will do; you cannot kill off this French side so easily anymore. And given half a chance, they will strike.Here are the competitors.What’s the big team news?Ireland have made four changes to the starting team.With Murray out due to a hamstring injury and no Sexton, Billy Burns lines up at fly-half with Jamison Gibson-Park his half-back partner.Captain Henderson comes off the bench to start and Rhys Ruddock lines up with six on his back. There are further changes on the bench as Ed Byrne, Ultan Dillane, Ross Byrne and uncapped nine Craig Casey coming in.For France, Damien Penaud starts on the wing and Anthony Jelonch comes into the back-row as Fabien Galthie makes two changes to his starting team. Teddy Thomas and Dylan Cretin fall to the bench.The reserves section is where more changes come, with prop Hassane Kolingar replacing the injured Jean-Baptiste Gros and hulking Uini Atonio named ahead Dorian Aldegheri. With a five-three split on the bench, Anthony Bouthier also comes in as Louis Carbonel falls out of the squad completely.Ireland head coach Andy Farrell(Getty Images)What have the coaches said?Ireland head coach Andy Farrell hopes Billy Burns can put last week’s error behind him, saying: “He’s been great. He’s strong, Billy. He’s a proper footballer. Everyone makes mistakes and, at international rugby, he understands the extent of that. But he’s a true professional, his team are right behind him.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Ireland v France, Sunday 14 February, Aviva StadiumThe match kicks off at 3pm and will be broadcast live on ITV in the UK and on Virgin One in Ireland, with commentary also on BBC Radio 5 Live and BBC Radio Ulster as well as RTE radio.If you’re outside the UK and Ireland, check out our guide to Six Nations coverage around the world.An all-RFU team takes charge of officiating this one in Dublin. Luke Pearce is the match referee, with Wayne Barnes and Christophe Ridley the assistance. TMO duties will be taken on by Tom Foley.What are the line-ups?Ireland: Hugo Keenan; Keith Earls, Garry Ringrose, Robbie Henshaw, James Lowe; Billy Burns, Jamison Gibson Park; Cian Healy, Rob Herring, Andrew Porter, Tadhg Beirne, Iain Henderson (captain), Rhys Ruddock, Josh van der Flier, CJ Stander.Replacements: Ronan Kelleher, Ed Byrne, Tadhg Furlong, Ultan Dillane, Will Connors, Craig Casey, Ross Byrne, Jordan Larmour.France: Brice Dulin; Damian Penaud, Arthur Vincent, Gael Fickou, Gabin Villiere; Matthieu Jalibert, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Bernard Le Roux, Paul Willemse, Anthony Jelonch, Gregory Alldritt, Charles Ollivon (captain).Replacements: Pierre Bourgarit, Hassane Kolingar, Uini Atonio, Romain Taofifenua, Dylan Cretin, Baptiste Serin, Anthony Bouthier, Teddy Thomas. Antoine Dupont is tackled by Jamison Gibson Park(Getty Images) Everything you need to know as France head to Dublin France boss Fabien Galthie said: “We will have to block them at the ruck exits because Gibson Park likes to carry the ball. Burns is of the same calibre. This team is experienced. Just a quick note for those absent – Sexton and Murray among others – to whom we wish the fastest of recoveries.”What are the odds?France are favourites for this match, with odds of 8-13 on Bet365. An Ireland win is 11-8 while a draw is 20-1.If you fancy putting some money on the fixture, Bet365 have a welcome bonus of up to £100 in Bet Credits.Min deposit £5. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit. Min odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. Returns exclude Bet Credits stake. Time limits and T&Cs apply.Over-18s only. BeGambleAware.Any interesting statistics?2011 was the last time France won in Dublin.Cian Healy’s 106th cap means he overtakes John Hayes as Ireland’s most-capped prop.Last week against Italy was the first time Antoine Dupont had won a Man of the Match award in a Six Nations match.Dupont set-up three tries in the first half last week and went on to score one himself.France have won five of their last six Test matches while Ireland have won 50%.21 – Tadhg Beirne made the most carries in the opening round of the Six Nations, with 21.12 – It has been suggested this week by La Rochelle coach Ronan O’Gara that in training, France’s assistant coaches get 12 minutes each to drill their area of the game, so everything is done at a pace and maintains a level of intensity.The last time Ireland ran out without either Murray or Sexton starting was in March 2011, according to Russ Petty.last_img read more

Lessons learned at St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Vicki R. FitzsimmonsPosted Jun 28, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 28, 2012 at 11:10 pm While a visitor at St Andrews, i saw some of the work done , and the smiling faces. Also saw the smiling faces creating more smiling faces! Truly a blessing. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mary Elizabeth Landrum says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Vicki Fitzsimmons[Episcopal News Service] On the first Thursday of each month (except July), St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Nogales, Arizona, is transformed into St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic. Here, children living in Mexico (not the U.S.) come for free, specialized medical care; for some it is their last hope. God is at work through volunteers providing health care for children with serious medical conditions, such as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, vision loss, Down syndrome, etc. The parents cannot afford the needed medical care, or Mexican doctors have given up on the patients.St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic was founded in 1973 by a group of mothers in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. They had children with cerebral palsy and wanted to know how to help them. One of them knew a therapist in Tucson. When she came to show them how to work with their children, she noted that some could be helped with orthopedic surgery. She invited Dr. Frankel, an orthopedic surgeon in Tucson, to accompany her on her next visit. From this beginning, word spread that these children were being helped in neighbors’ homes. The number of patients became larger, and the informal clinic was moved to a nearby orphanage. When Mexican doctors became concerned about American doctors practicing medicine in Mexico, Dr. Frankel looked for a site across “the line” in Nogales, Arizona. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and its parishioners welcomed the small clinic.Dr. Frankel brought in a specialist to fit braces and prostheses. An audiologist was recruited when it was noted that many children did not hear well. Word of mouth increased both the number of patients and number and variety of health professionals who volunteered. In 1977 the clinic began a partnership with Shriners hospitals in Spokane and Sacramento to provide needed surgeries. Doctors and nurses from these hospitals come to each clinic to assess children for surgery at their hospitals and to do follow-up on their patients. The clinic arranges and finances transportation for each patient and one parent.In 1990, St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic, Inc. received its 501(c)(3) status. The board of directors appointed the Rev. Ed Gustafson, an Episcopal priest, as its first executive director. The clinic has continued to grow and has stabilized to approximately 200-250 patients per clinic day. The health departments staffed by volunteers are audiology, cardiology, dermatology, nutrition, occupational therapy, orthotics, orthopedics, Reiki therapy, pediatrics, physical therapy, psychology, speech therapy, and  vision. Specialists fit children with special shoes, wheelchairs, strollers, and walkers. All is provided free to the patients.I was invited to visit the clinic by friends I knew from attending St. Francis-in-the-Valley Episcopal Church in Green Valley, approximately 30 miles north of Nogales. I went, had a tour, felt that I could do something, and returned the next month to volunteer in the kitchen. At the time, I was spending the summer doing research and writing in our vacation home in Green Valley. While at the clinic, I felt this wonderful presence in the church, so I went to church services on Sunday and was welcomed by the parishioners. When my husband Jim returned to take me back to Illinois, I told him that I had changed churches and hoped he didn’t mind.I returned to the University of Illinois for the academic year where I taught personal finance. My mind kept returning to the clinic. I was also preparing for retirement and wondering what I would do in retirement. I prayed for direction, and the answer was that I hadn’t seen a newsletter for the clinic. Since I wrote a personal finance newsletter for high school teachers, I thought this would be a good fit. When we retired and met with Fr. Ed about what we could do for the clinic, I told him what answer had been given to my prayer. He said, “And I’ve been praying for a newsletter editor.” Incidentally, Jim became involved too, first driving the van to transport patients and families between the border and the church on clinic day, then helping to transform the church to a clinic and back, and now treasurer and clinic board member.Now I write the quarterly newsletter, take photos for the website as well as for the newsletter, and handle any needed publicity for the clinic. In this role, I go to all the departments throughout the church and preschool building, even the rector’s office, on clinic day and interview doctors, patients, and parents. Sometimes I have an interpreter working with me; sometimes not. I speak a little Spanish, which helps.What I do is a labor of love -I am a volunteer. I have learned that it’s not about me and what I do; it’s about the children who come to our clinic. Their smiles as they receive needed care or a new wheel chair makes all my time and energy worthwhile.Angela, born with only partial legs, shows her new prosthetic feet. Photo/Vicki FitzsimmonsI get to see the wonderful work that our volunteer doctors and health care practitioners do at every clinic. Veronica was born with a severely deformed foot, one she would never be able to walk on. She went to Shriners Hospital for amputation of her foot. To do a story for the clinic newsletter, Jim and I went to Tucson to see the preliminary fitting of her new prosthesis. What joy on that child’s face! Three years later, her mother showed me a prized possession – a gold medal Veronica won in a race using her prosthetic leg. Her mother was so proud of her daughter.Angela was born with no feet and partial legs. She, too, had surgery to amputate her legs. When she was seven, we took her to a presentation of funds to charities. Angela walked and danced her way to the front of the room on her “stubbies” (precursors to prostheses) so she could receive the check for the clinic. She smiled from ear to ear. There was not a dry eye in the room. What courage and stamina in such a small child!There are lots of stories I could share with you, but there is no space here. Please go to our website to learn more about this heart-warming clinic.I also raise funds for clinic patients who cannot speak but can use an alternative communication device such as the SpringBoard, which can be programmed to “talk” with family, friends, and teachers when the child touches parts of the screen. I feel a special bond with these children because I could not talk until I was four years old. Fortunately, I had an easy “fix”; I was tongue-tied. The doctor clipped the membrane holding down my tongue, and I started talking paragraphs. My family says I have never stopped talking since!To raise these funds, once a year I perform a voice recital. Singing is my hobby, and I have taken voice lessons for several years. I enjoy putting together the program, which includes showing an eight-minute video about the clinic, available on our website. Donated funds are targeted to pay for a communications device for a selected child. In March, José Luís got his device and when he saw it, his eyes lit up. He went right to it and started putting phrases together. He had been watching the other children work with their SpringBoards each month while he waited for his device so he knew exactly what to do. What joy I felt watching him communicate more fully for the first time!In the 11 years that I have been involved with this wonderful clinic, I have learned many things: (a) knowledge of a variety of medical problems that were new to me, (b) a greater understanding of Mexican culture and peoples, (c) the joy of being able to communicate with patients and parents in my limited Spanish, and (d) patience. I have watched patients and their parents wait for several hours to see different doctors and therapists. Many of them have traveled 3 to 15 hours or more to arrive at our clinic and waited in line to be processed through Immigration at the border. And, at the end of clinic day, they will travel many miles again before arriving home. And they never complain. When I have to wait in line at the bank, post office, or grocery, I think about all the patience I have seen demonstrated at the clinic, and I wait, patiently.— Vicki R. Fitzsimmons, Ph.D., is a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Nogales, Arizona. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Children Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (1) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Lessons learned at St. Andrew’s Children’s Clinic Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Consagraciones, elecciones y consentimientos de septiembre a diciembre de 2012…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Posted Aug 20, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Consagraciones, elecciones y consentimientos de septiembre a diciembre de 2012 en la Iglesia Episcopal El Gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal: Esta información es otra de una serie continua sobre el gobierno de la Iglesia Episcopal Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [20 de agosto de 2012] En los próximos cuatro meses del 1 de septiembre al 31 diciembre la Iglesia Episcopal será testigo de las consagraciones de seis obispos y la elección de un obispo.ConsagracionesSeis consagraciones de obispos están programadas de septiembre a diciembre. La Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori oficiará en los servicios de ordinación.6 de octubre: Diócesis de Texas, Sufragáneo: El Rdo Jeff W. Fisher, elegido el 2 de junio13 de octubre: Diócesis de Atlanta: El Muy Rdo Robert C. Wright, elegido el 2 de junio20 de octubre: Diócesis de Pittsburgh: El Rdo Dorsey WM McConnell, elegido el 21 de abril17 de noviembre: Diócesis de Rhode Island: El Muy Rdo Nicholas Knisely, elegido el 2 de junio1 de diciembre: Diócesis del Oeste de Massachusetts: El Rdo Doctor John Douglas Fisher, elegido el 2 de junio15 de diciembre: Diócesis de Lexington, El Muy Rdo Douglas Hahn elegido el 18 de agosto, en espera de un proceso exitoso de autorización canónica.EleccionesDe septiembre a diciembre, hay una elección de obispo prevista:El 10 de noviembre: Diócesis de Eau ClaireProceso de consentimiento canónicoNo hay ningún proceso de consentimiento canónico en curso. Sin embargo, el proceso de consentimiento canónico se espera que comience en septiembre por el candidato elegido el 18 de agosto en la Diócesis de Lexington.Resumen del procesoTras la elección, el candidato elegido es un obispo electo. Después de algunas cuestiones de procedimiento, incluidos los exámenes, se envían las notificaciones oficiales a los obispos con jurisdicción (solamente a obispos diocesanos) con avisos separados a las comisiones permanentes de cada una de las diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal. Estos avisos requieren sus propias medidas y firmas.Para que un obispo electo pueda convertirse en obispo, en virtud del canon III.11.4, 6 de la Iglesia Episcopal, la mayoría de los obispos con jurisdicción y la mayoría de los comités permanentes diocesanos deben dar su consentimiento a la ordenación del obispo electo como obispo dentro de 120 días de haber recibido el aviso de la elección. Estos pasos se dan por separado.Una vez que el Obispo/a Presidente recibe los consentimientos necesarios, deberá “sin demora” notificar a la diócesis que ha elegido y al obispo electo, sin esperar a la expiración del plazo de 120 días, y “deberá”, tras la aceptación de la elección por el obispo elegido, “tomar medidas para la ordenación”.Sin embargo, si la mayoría de los obispos diocesanos no da su consentimiento, y/o la mayoría de las comisiones permanentes no da su consentimiento, el Obispo/a Presidente, en conformidad con el Canon III.11.5, está obligado a declarar la nulidad e invalidez de la elección. En esos casos, una persona elegida por la diócesis no será ordenada. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Living in Egypt through revolution, protests, new opportunities

first_img Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John-Albert Dickert says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Sep 24, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group John Smylie says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler is an Episcopal priest living in Egypt. He has served since 2003 as rector of St. John the Baptist Church in Cairo. In this ENS interview, Chandler reflects on the changes in Egypt over the past two years and speaks about the recent protests triggered by a film containing anti-Islam content.ENS: Egypt has seen some major transformations in the past two years. How would you describe the country’s current political landscape and infrastructure to someone who doesn’t really understand the context?P-GC: Where does one start, when it comes to Egypt over the last 18 months, let alone the last few weeks, even days? Each day is so full of surprise that it is hard to stay up with it all.Obviously, after more than 60 years of authoritarian rule, and decades of being a police state, Egypt is experiencing what might be called “growing pains.” However, it has to be said that in the most democratic elections since 1952, the Egyptians did freely select their leader, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood, who won 51 percent of the vote. The famous Tahrir Square went crazy with joy when the announcement was made. Many were jubilant because a proponent of conservative Islam had won. Others, not so excited about this and even concerned about the agenda of the Muslim Brotherhood, nevertheless rejoiced in the revolution’s true victory.One of the main challenges right now is related to the basic infrastructure of the country, let alone the economic issues. These challenges are really starting to pile up. There is excessive trash everywhere, less security (the police force is minimal), electricity goes off more and more, less medicines are available at pharmacies, wheat is thought to perhaps soon run out, there are shortages of bottled water, etc.One respected political analyst here described the current state of Egypt, well with these words: “Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity…”However, in the midst of it all, we see so many positive signs that are critical for Egypt’s future health, and recognize that one must have a long-term perspective. So we are rooting Egypt on and are immensely proud of the Egyptians.ENS: What have these changes meant for the country in general, and for Christians in particular?P-GC: Those most concerned at Morsi’s victory were the Coptic Christians. Yet the concern was largely based on fear of the unknown. The familiar, even if undesired, always feels more secure. Rumors started proliferating against Morsi, and not only did he try to dismiss their claims, during his victory speech Morsi sought to allay the fears of the Copts. “We as Egyptians, Muslims and Christians … will face together the strife and conspiracies that target our national unity…. We are all equal in rights, and we all have duties towards this homeland.” He even officially resigned from the Muslim Brotherhood following his victory speech. Nevertheless, some Copts are not convinced, instead believing the country has been slowly but surely manipulated into Islamist rule. Egypt is a country of rumors!One of the first actions of President Morsi was to invite the heads of all the Christian denominations to the Presidential Palace. He warmly received them and assured them that Christians are equal citizens in Egypt and it is his duty to make sure that every citizen receives his or her rights. The president also told them stories from the history of Islam of how Muslim leaders were very keen to ensure the right of citizenship of all Christians in Egypt. The president promised to do his best to ensure the rights of Christians, especially in regard to building churches. The Christian leaders came out of the 35-minute meeting very encouraged.Quite remarkably, President Morsi invited the heads of the denominations in Egypt to meet with him last month, for a second time. Twice in less than two months to talk and listen them. This had not happened in Egypt in the last 30 years. President Morsi assured them that his Islamic faith commands him to be gracious and just with people of other faiths. They left the meeting very encouraged and determined to do their best in order to see the Egypt that we all dream of.Where I serve, at St. John’s Episcopal Church in southern Cairo, the unique opportunities for ministry have grown exponentially in this “new Egypt,” with far more religious freedom than before the revolution. We soon host our fall Abraham Forum that brings Christians and Muslims together around a theme relevant to the country. Our special speaker is Jeffrey Fleishman, the Cairo bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times, novelist, and Pulitzer Prize finalist. Nevertheless, regardless of what the reality is, more and more Coptic Christians desire to emigrate. There is too often this inherent fear of the “other.”ENS: What is the latest on the protests in Cairo? Who is protesting and why? Are the protests just a response to the anti-Islam film or is it more complicated than that? P-GC: I know many have been following in the Western media the unrest that has been taking place in Egypt and other parts of the Middle East as a result of the immensely disgraceful film produced by an Egyptian man of Christian background living in the U.S., whose 13-minute film trailer was released on YouTube.We were actually very safe. Most of the unrest was very localized, just around the U.S. Embassy downtown, and though it started out with a couple thousand protesters, it ended up very quickly as a relatively small group. In some other countries, like Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, the protests have ended up with more serious consequences. However, here in Egypt, it has to date been largely a mixture of different groups grasping the chance to serve their own interests, settle scores and express their frustrations. In Egypt, the recent unrest has largely not been from Islamic fundamentalists as portrayed in the media.In this sense, the U.S. Embassy area and nearby Tahrir Square became the battlefield for disgruntled people, and not just a protest against the film. According to the respected Egyptian political analyst and journalist Ayman El-Sayyad, “…people grasped the chance to vent their anger.”As to who these people are, well, it is quite a motley crew, all with differing reasons for demonstrating violently. El Sayyad expressed it well: “It’s…Islamists against the U.S. administration; revolutionaries against [Egyptian] security forces; Salafists [a fundamentalist Islamic group] against the Muslim Brotherhood [who are much more moderate]; and the marginalized [i.e. unemployed] against the reality in which they live.”ENS: How have the president and other political leaders responded to the protests given their commitment to building a more democratic society in Egypt?P-GC: Thankfully, President Morsi, while condemning the dishonorable film, also strongly condemned violence of any kind in demonstrations. This public denouncement of violence helped to dissolve a lot of potentially violent protests.As covered in the New York Times, Khairat El-Shater, the deputy guide of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, said: “Our condolences to the American people for the loss of their ambassador and three members of the embassy staff in Libya.” He went on to highlight that he did not hold the U.S. government or its citizens responsible for the acts of “the few” that abuse the right to free expression, despite his disapproval over this anti-Islam film. He also condemned the “breach of the U.S. embassy premises” by Egyptian protesters, which he described as illegal under international law. He described the current state of Egypt well with these words: “Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity, and public anger must be dealt with responsibly and with caution.”So in short, we are safe and the vast majority of Egyptians continue to be extremely magnanimous in all ways toward guests in their country. While the media often gives the opposite impression, nothing could be further from the reality we experience here.ENS: Some of the justification for producing this anti-Islam film has been based on America’s rights for freedom of speech and expression. What about instances where freedom of speech and expression cause offense to millions of people?P-GC: It is very difficult to explain the concept of freedom of expression in a context like this. The worldview starting point is completely different than in most Western cultures. In a shame culture, which is prevalent in the Middle East, preserving honor is the highest priority. People in different parts of the world react differently, especially when it comes to matters of faith.One thing that is interesting is that the four Episcopal/Anglican diocesan bishops recently sent a joint letter to the Secretary General of the United Nations suggesting “that an international declaration be negotiated that outlaws the intentional and deliberate insulting or defamation of persons (such as prophets), symbols, texts and constructs of belief deemed holy by people of faith.” Their motivation in doing so is that they believe that this might help to avoid the possibility of further violence – between people from different cultural or philosophical backgrounds or followers of different faiths.Whether one believes this is the proper response or not, it does show how seriously local church leaders here are taking all this.[The four bishops are the Most Rev. Mouneer Hanna Anis, bishop of Egypt and president bishop of the Episcopal/Anglican Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East; the Rt. Rev. Michael Owen Lewis, bishop of Cyprus and the Gulf; the Rt. Rev. Bill Musk, area bishop for North Africa; and the Rt. Rev. Grant LeMarquand, area bishop for the Horn of Africa.]ENS: You have said it’s not just Islamic fundamentalists who are protesting. But in some countries, the protests have largely involved people associated with extremist groups have they not, or is that misrepresentation in the media?P-GC: To be very honest, each country’s context is so completely different that it is hard to answer this with any accuracy. One of the challenges we face here is that West often sees the “Muslim World” as this monolithic body, almost as if they are one political and religious entity. However, the issues in one country are as different from those in another country as would be the issues in the U.S. from Denmark, for example, both seen as “Christian countries” in Muslim eyes.ENS: How damaging are the inaccuracies reported in the media?P-GC: First of all, I am not so sure that the Western media necessarily is intentional in mis-portraying the situation. It is most likely that there is a general lack of understanding in order to present the news within the correct context, and also that the very nature of the news media focuses on reporting controversy, which often magnifies what is happening out of proportion. As a result the damage done is that it tends to reinforce negative stereotypes of people in this region based on misinformation.ENS: What does the world need to learn from this series of events?P-GC: I believe all of this is a powerful reminder of how important it is for all people (including those in the media) to be responsible and self-restraining in expressing or promoting insulting or malevolent opinions with regard to religion. Instead, we need to focus on waging peace on all people. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Middle East TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Living in Egypt through revolution, protests, new opportunities An interview with Episcopal priest Paul-Gordon Chandler Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (5) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service September 24, 2012 at 10:04 pm To Our Brother Paul and all In G-d”s Love,I just can’t get the phrase “You will know us by our love” out of my mind. During this Yom Kippur you and all our brothers and sisters will be in my thoughts and prayers. I cannot thank you enough for your shared thoughts and insight into the peoples of Egypt.As Always,John-Albert DickertChrist Church CathedralCincinnati, Ohio USA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Chris Morgan says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 9, 2012 at 5:21 pm Never apologize for our freedom of speech. Some kook someplace, whether in the US or elsewhere will do something, say something, at some time, that offends Muslims. Tell me how you stop that. It is impossible and we look weak when we fail to point this out. To say this film was the cause of the unrest simply demonstrates the cultural problems of Islam. When Islam was the center of intellectual strength and political power, say 500-1000 years ago, no slander or libel of the prophet would have caused a ripple. There is a deep sense of inferiority that permeates the Muslim middle east that can only by remedied with jobs, maturation of political institutions and the rule of law that can be counted on. In other words, growth in the confidence of self. Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing September 24, 2012 at 5:13 pm Thank you for this informative article designed to enlighten not to enrage. September 24, 2012 at 4:35 pm Great article and interview. Thank you for sharing your valuable insights on this issue. September 24, 2012 at 6:12 pm Paul-Gordon, Thank you for your on the ground, reasoned perspective and thank you for your faithful presentation of the gospel. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Ben Badgett says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Elizabeth Marcotte says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

Advent and Christmas resources from Episcopal Relief & Development

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Dec 3, 2012 Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal Relief & Development] This Advent, Episcopal Relief & Development offers a variety of ways to mark the season of anticipation and celebrate the birth of Christ, who heals our hurting world.“Advent is a season to strive toward the coming of Christ, and to further God’s kingdom on earth,” said Rob Radtke, the organization’s President.  “When we take action to seek and serve Christ in others – in our family, our hometown or halfway around the world – we are preparing the way of the Lord.  I hope that Episcopal Relief & Development’s friends and supporters will be inspired to take advantage of the opportunities in their lives to engage joyfully with the spirit of Advent this year.”Episcopal Relief & Development’s 2012 Advent Calendar features reflections, prayers and gift ideas inspired by the organization’s Gifts for Life catalog.  Special “Gifts for Kids” suggestions like nutritious food, quality education and essential health care can help children learn about stewardship, generosity and global needs and concerns.  The online calendar and a downloadable PDF can be found at www.er-d.org/advent.“We invite congregations and individuals alike to walk with us this Advent,” said Judy Sawler, Episcopal Relief & Development’s Manager for Direct Response Marketing. “This year’s Advent calendar calls us to reflect on what we can do to share God’s love with others, and particularly with people in need worldwide.  Our Gifts for Life program is a great way for people to engage with our mission that’s fun and spreads holiday warmth to friends and family.”Gifts for Life are available year-round, but Christmas is the perfect time to give a gift with lasting impact.  New to the catalog this year are rainwater harvesting systems, memberships in women’s literacy groups and vocational training for young and disabled people.  Popular items include goats and chickens, which provide families with a source of milk or eggs, enriching the household diet and helping to generate income.  High-impact gifts like communal wells and vegetable gardens can improve health and wellbeing for an entire community.  And “green gifts” like energy efficient cook stoves and trees for reforestation promote sustainable solutions that protect and nurture the environment.Purchasing Gifts for Life is easy and secure – via mail, over the phone or through the online catalog at www.er-d.org/GiftsForLife.  Printed copies of the catalog can be ordered through Episcopal Marketplace.  Children will love the colorful photographs and engaging stories of how each item makes a difference, making Gifts for Life a wonderful family or Sunday School project.  Gift givers can choose a printed card or a customizable e-card to send to the person in whose honor the purchase was made.For further enrichment, Episcopal Relief & Development has published a set of six Children’s Chapel liturgies that provide an opportunity for children to give thanks for essential gifts of Light, Water, Seeds, Soil, Animals and New Life.  These modules can be used separately or as a series to help children think about basic needs and what they can do to help families move from poverty to prosperity.“Advent is a great time to reach out to kids because they get excited about the holidays,” said Pamela Penn, Program Officer for Church Engagement.  “The idea of gift giving is on a lot of people’s minds, and it’s easy to tie in lessons about generosity, thankfulness and thoughtfulness about what’s really important.”For those with a coffee drinker on their gift list, Episcopal Relief & Development is offering two Bishops Blend Christmas Boxes through its coffee partner, Pura Vida Create Good.  The Coffee Box includes smooth and rich Bishops Blend Regular Roast, extra-dark Kaldi’s Roast and Café de la Paz.  The Coffee and Chocolate Box delights with Bishops Blend Regular Roast, Bishops Blend Decaf and three bars of Single Origin Guatemalan chocolate.  The boxes are $29 each, and are shipped with a personalized message for the recipient.  A portion of Bishops Blend sales helps to sustain Episcopal Relief & Development’s work worldwide.  Visit www.er-d.org/BishopsBlend to order or learn more.Episcopal Relief & Development is the international relief and development agency of the Episcopal Church and an independent 501(c)(3) organization. The agency takes its mandate from Jesus’ words found in Matthew 25.  Its programs work towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Episcopal Relief & Development works closely with the worldwide Church and ecumenical partners to help rebuild after disasters and to empower local communities to find lasting solutions that fight poverty, hunger and disease, including HIV/AIDS and malaria. Episcopal Relief & Development Advent, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Advent and Christmas resources from Episcopal Relief & Development Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

‘One church in Europe’

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA October 26, 2013 at 7:14 am An interesting idea, but are either of these jurisdictions actually growing? Rector Tampa, FL October 26, 2013 at 12:11 pm Perfectly stated ! October 31, 2013 at 6:51 pm What wonderful news! The overlapping Anglican jurisdictions in Europe are a source of confusion, especially to the numerous visitors to the Continent. Even a common directory, or computer listing someplace would be a help. When I’m on the Continent, I usually stick to the Convocation of American Churches, or the Church of England parishes. (When I’m really stuck, I go to a Roman Catholic church where, lamentably, I can’t receive Communion.) Keep up the momentum and the good work!Now, if only we could lure the Church of England’s Diocese of Europe into this partnership… October 23, 2013 at 9:02 pm I pray that the Holy Spirit will continue to work in the world’s churches for unity! The Body of Christ cannot be separated. It is one; each part has a different function in the body, but they work together for the good of the whole. Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 23, 2013 at 4:25 pm Go! Go! Go! Rector Collierville, TN November 5, 2013 at 1:22 pm I was privileged to work with Old Catholic churches, Convocation churches and the Bishop for the Armed Forces both in 1981-83 while living in Germany and 1992-94 while living in the Netherlands. There were some shared activities then, but I have been praying for this for a long time. I was invited to celebrate the Eucharist in German in Wurzburg in June 1994 for the Old Catholic congregation there. October 26, 2013 at 11:45 am People grow spiritually if they grow at all. Numbers don’t matter. All churches today are losing membership. No one really knows the reason except we live in a modern world of technology that enables people to communicate through technology, not always with one another face to face. Christ’s goal for the “church” is that all will become one as the Father and I are one. Every step towards unity wherever it happens and to whom is a step forward, not backward. That is my belief. October 24, 2013 at 12:11 pm This is true Walt. There are many independent catholic churches in the US claiming to be “Old Catholic” but who have no connection to Utrecht at all. Sadly, some of these groups are very much on the fringe theologically and are trying to claim legitimacy by claiming to be “Old Catholics.” Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI October 24, 2013 at 4:48 pm I lived in Germany 1960-63 and often attended Old Catholic services, met Bishop Steinwachs – a marvelous old apostle – and attended an Old Catholic retreat. In spirit and letter, both these communities seemed virtually identical, although they come out of different experiences, vis a vis the Papacy. I thought we were in full communion then? It’s wonderful to see the two developing closer ecclesiastical ties. We’ve been soul-mates for a long, long time. Comments (16) Rector Shreveport, LA October 27, 2013 at 5:27 pm I have been an Old Catholic Priest since 1977 and a Bishiop since 1979. I am presently pastoring a Lutheran Church in Canada and am looking to get involved with the Church in Europe. I am of Jewish parentage, ergo Jewish born, and would on behalf of the Church get preaching assignments throughout Europe preaching against the Nazi movement that is proliferating throughout Europe. Please answer New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY David Cornell says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC October 24, 2013 at 2:12 am Yes, the Old Catholic churches of the Union of Utrecht already ordain women to the priesthood. The Polish National Catholic Church is no longer a member of the Union of Utrecht, having left it precisely over the issue of its sister churches’ decisions to ordain women (and their general liberalization). Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Joyce Ann Edmondson says: By Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 23, 2013 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ecumenical & Interreligious Fr. Gaylord Hitchcock says: The Rev. Linda Baker Pineo says: Featured Events November 4, 2013 at 10:09 am So when they state Full communion are they meaning that all Old Catholics even the ones in the United states will be in Communion? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Barbara Harris says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Walt Kindergan says: November 12, 2013 at 5:08 am There are also many Independent Catholic jurisdictions in the United States which do not claim to be “Old Catholic” that do, however, possess valid apostolic succession and whose theology is certainly not “on the fringe”. We, in The National Catholic Church of America, are part of the apostolic heritage of the late Bishop Carlos Duarte Costa, former Roman Catholic Ordinary of the Diocese of Botucatu, Brazil who broke with Rome in 1945 and began the establishment of national catholic churches.The NCCA has, from its inception, ordained men and women without the obligation of celibacy, married same sex and opposite sex couples, invited all baptized Christians (including those divorced and remarried) to receive the Body and Blood of Christ at our Eucharistic Table as well as encouraged individuals to make responsible moral decisions in the light of the gospel. We share the same statements of belief (The Apostles Creed and The Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed) share by most churches of apostolic derivation. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img [ooyala code=”93bWg5Zzqa4k_2BmrPimkACgjDMIB5hq” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″][Episcopal News Service] Old Catholics and Episcopalians in Europe have agreed to enter into deeper communion, seeking new ways to collaborate, preparing a common structure, and leading the way towards the ultimate goal of becoming one church in Europe.The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe passed two resolutions during its Oct. 17-20 convention in Rome following a charge delivered by Old Catholic Archbishop Joris Vercammen, in which he encouraged the churches to “overcome our borders” and become “agents of transformation.”One resolution commits the congregations of the convocation to seek to collaborate with their neighboring Old Catholic congregations by developing mutual ministries in worship, program and outreach, and by increasing knowledge and awareness of each other’s traditions.Another resolution supports the bishop-in-charge of the convocation and the archbishop of Utrecht “in their joint efforts to foster and develop our common life in Christ.”The Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht is the Episcopal Church’s longest-standing full communion partner, dating back to the Bonn Agreement of 1931.“The work of full communion is meant for fuller communion than we can envision,” Vercammen told the delegates Oct. 18 at the convocation’s convention. “I hope I am able to seduce you to the freedom for which the Holy Spirit wants to open our minds.”The Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop-in-charge of the convocation, said that Vercammen had planted a seed “for us to pray about who we are together … [and to] determine that we no longer consider ourselves separate churches … We need to think outside ourselves.”Whalon told ENS that there is a strong desire to form “a communion of churches that can have a common witness in continental Europe” and that such a communion would bring the Old Catholic Church and the Episcopal Church “as close as possible to full visible unity without giving up local autonomy of individual jurisdictions.” The deepening of relationships between Old Catholics and Episcopalians, he said, might encourage other Anglican churches and full communion partners in Europe to work more intentionally towards unity.The Church of England’s Diocese in Europe also includes parishes throughout the continent. The Reformed Episcopal Church of Spain and the Lusitanian Church of Portugal are the two other Anglican jurisdictions in Europe.“On the very long term it could be the aim to have only one ecclesiastical structure that would be really both Old Catholic and Episcopal,” Vercammen said. “For the time being we have to organize the steps we have to take in order to realize this long term goal.”“I’m guessing the Old Catholics might help us to become new Episcopalians,” President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings said in her address to the convention, meeting at St. Paul’s Within-the-Walls, an Episcopal church in the center of Rome. She described Vercammen’s proposal as “a radical form of community, a new way to be church, the church we’re called to be.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, after hearing news about Vercammen’s appeal and the convocation’s response, told ENS that she is “deeply grateful for the growing awareness of the possibilities of full communion in Europe, and the increasing commitment to make it a greater reality.“Imagine the missional witness and possibility of a seamless Anglican-Episcopal-Old Catholic-Lutheran Christian community!” she added. “The strong and deepening relationship between Old Catholics and Episcopalians in Europe is the forerunner, which just might lead other parts of the Body of Christ into greater partnership.”Jefferts Schori was a guest of the Old Catholic Church in 2011 when she visited Utrecht and delivered the Quasimodo Lecture, an annual event that explores issues of faith in contemporary society.Vercammen, during his remarks to the convocation’s convention, quoted from that lecture, during which Jefferts Schori said that ecumenism “is basically housekeeping work – cleaning up the household, setting it in order, so that it can be a home … Ecumenical work begins in the baptismal vision of a restored body of Christ, but it cannot stop at any limited version of what God’s body includes. We are here to help the whole, and that’s the future I want to point toward in being catholic beyond borders.”Following that lecture, Vercammen told ENS that more creativity is needed in dealing with overlapping jurisdictions.“We need more concrete initiatives,” such as common searches for church leadership to serve across jurisdictions, he said, “and then we can really build a nucleus of church where Christians of all origins can come together. We have a unique opportunity and it would be a pity if we were not to use it.”The Episcopal Church entered into full communion with the Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht in 1934 on the basis of the Bonn Agreement three years earlier. The Old Catholic Church includes about 200,000 members in several national churches in Europe, located in the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, France and Italy. They separated from the Roman Catholic Church because they could not accept the definition of papal infallibility presented by the first Vatican Council in 1870.The Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe serves a culturally diverse demographic of Christians in 20 parishes and missions throughout Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland.In addition to the Old Catholics, the Episcopal Church is in full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Mar Thoma Syrian Church of Malabar, India, the Moravian Church in North America and the Philippine Independent Church.Churches in full communion formally recognize that they share essential doctrines, including Baptism and Eucharist; agree to accept the service of each other’s clergy; and pledge to work together in evangelism and mission. The churches become interdependent while remaining autonomous.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Daniel McKenney says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rt Rev Peter J Sterling says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Father Les Singleton says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anjel Scarborough+ says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ ‘One church in Europe’ Old Catholics, Episcopalians commit to deeper communion Joyce Ann Edmondson says: Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY October 23, 2013 at 10:09 pm What happens in America. In 1946 the Episcopal Church and the National Catholic Polish church had full communion…. that lasted until the Episcopal church had women priests.Are there women priests in the Old Catholic church? could there be??? Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Most Rev. Richard G. Roy, OSJD says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Duane Alexander Miller says: October 23, 2013 at 6:23 pm God’s grace continues to work miracles. May it come to pass in my lifetime, Amen! Rector Martinsville, VA john neir says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 23, 2013 at 7:37 pm I have heard that we are NOT in full communion with the Old Catholics in the United States because they are affiliated with the Polish National Catholic Church and have withdrawn from the Union of Utrecht. Is that true? I think many do not know this. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tony Price says: David L. Veal says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more