Day 4 of Raiders training camp: A small dose of Antonio Brown

first_imgNAPA — The Raiders got a glimpse of life with Antonio Brown Tuesday, and the perennial Pro Bowl receiver left coaches and teammates wanting more.That’s just a little preview, a little taste, so imagine him being in on every play with (Derek Carr) back there,” wide receiver J.J. Nelson said. “It’s going to be fun. It’s going to be exciting. I’m looking forward to lighting up the scoreboard.”Brown went through warmups and drills in full pads, and then through one session with receivers …last_img

LEED Gets Tougher Energy Requirements

first_imgAs indicated above, the referenced energy standard and modeling requirements do not change and still require the applicant to calculate the baseline building performance rating according to the building performance rating method in Appendix G of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda 25) using a computer simulation model for the whole building project. This is not a move to the newer 2010 version of the ASHRAE 90.1 standard.You can read the specific changes in the USGBC’s Rating System document.Note also that new point thresholds are provided for different building types (e.g., health care) to align the effective percentage increase in performance. Each of those is best identified in the Summary of changes. The move may be destabilizingIt is difficult to argue against increasing energy efficiency, but this change to LEED 2009 may have a destabilizing effect, since it changes a rating system in midstream, with little advance notice, cutting against the certainty that the real estate industry craves (even in this instance when the effective window will only be for those projects registered through October 31, 2016).Given that most building projects are budgeted, programmed, planned, and designed over a period of years, to propose a substantive change that will have significant first cost impact, to be effective in a matter of weeks, will reverberate throughout the building industry and no doubt expose participants to increased liability for this unexpected change. Additionally, projects attempting to comply with governmental mandates or contractual obligations for LEED certification may have problems complying.You are urged to consider the impact this may have, in particular for projects not yet registered, with the thought that all projects pursuing LEED 2009 should now be registered by April 7, 2016, in advance of the effective date of the change.Everyone involved with LEED projects should promptly review their contracts to determine the implications of this change in LEED and what amendments to contracts may be necessary. RELATED ARTICLES The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has announced that beginning on April 8, 2016, all new projects registering for LEED 2009 will need to satisfy increased minimum energy performance thresholds.According to USGBC, the results of a recent ballot show that 78.6% percent of the consensus body voted in favor of this change to the 7-year-old rating system. By LEED rules, a minimum of two-thirds approval was needed for any balloted measure.With this change, projects must now earn a minimum of four points in the Energy Performance credits. The referenced energy standard and modeling requirements in LEED 2009 will not change; buildings falling under the proposed change can use the same methodologies and referenced standards, but will need to earn additional points in order to achieve certification.This change is significant. The requirement that LEED projects will need to satisfy increased energy performance requirements will no doubt increase first costs. This is a change to a longstanding rating system that is the benchmark in green building laws, construction contracts, and more. Looking at the Costs of LEED v. 4What One Change Would You Make to LEED?What LEED Credit Is Almost Never Achieved?LEED Can Help Fix the Water ProblemAre LEED-Certified Buildings Energy-Efficient?Recent Changes to LEED for Homes — Part 1GBA Encyclopedia: LEED for Homes Change applies for the short termRecall that Rick Fedrizzi, retiring CEO of the USGBC, announced on October 29, 2014 that LEED users would be able to register projects under the LEED 2009 rating system until October 31, 2016. That extension was occasioned by the delay in LEED v4. Thus, this change will apply to LEED 2009 projects registering between April 8, 2016 and October 31, 2016 (the last day to register a project under LEED 2009).Today, the Minimum Energy Performance prerequisite, using Option 1, Whole Building Energy Simulation, requires that the applicant:Demonstrate a 10% improvement in the proposed building performance rating for new buildings, or a 5% improvement in the proposed building performance rating for major renovations to existing buildings, compared with the baseline building performance rating.The changed credit language is:For projects that register after 04/07/16 and are subject to the four point mandatory minimum, demonstrate an 18% improvement in the proposed building performance rating for new buildings, or a 14% improvement in the proposed building performance rating for major renovations to existing buildings, compared with the baseline building performance rating. Stuart Kaplow is an environmental attorney and a frequent contributor to GBA. This column was originally posted at Green Building Law Update. Kaplow is legal counsel and past chair of the U.S. Green Building Council Maryland.last_img read more

On Basketball: Kyrie gets a new address, but Cavs win trade

first_imgRegardless of all these Celtics-Cavaliers fireworks, it’s still Golden State’s world and probably will be for a long time. This deal didn’t change that.The Warriors will still be the favorites to win the last game of next season.The first game of next season, as luck would have it, just happens to be Boston at Cleveland.And just like that, the NBA has drama again.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ All good things, all edge to Cleveland.Give the Celtics credit for being bold. Danny Ainge knew winning the Eastern Conference’s regular-season crown last season was meaningless, so he completely blew up a team that was a No. 1 seed and got hammered by the Cavaliers in the East finals. Sure, the Celtics played most of that series without Thomas, but that wasn’t going to matter. The Cavs weren’t losing that series.So Ainge goes out and gets an All-Star point guard in Irving, after he hauls in Gordon Hayward during free agency and adds probable rookie of the year front-runner Jayson Tatum to the mix in the draft — plus gets another draft pick in either 2018 or 2019 for his trouble.It’s not a bad deal for the Celtics. They get Irving. It’s his team. A storied franchise is in his hands and he will savor that.It’s just a better deal for Cleveland, at least right now.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim There are many ways to claim victory in the deal made Tuesday night. Kyrie Irving wanted his own team and got it, so he wins. Isaiah Thomas gets to play with LeBron James, so he wins. The Cavaliers got rid of a supposedly disgruntled star, so they won. The Celtics now won’t have to decide if Thomas is worth something like a $180 million deal next summer, so they won. It’s all semantics.But look past all that.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingIn the end, Cleveland won. James won, too.Here’s a few reasons why James will be celebrating this deal: He’ll still have a high-octane point guard; he’s getting an absurdly good defender in Jae Crowder (he could have helped the Cavs’ cause against Golden State in The Finals); he won’t be going into the season dealing with drama about Irving’s Cleveland future; this trade might even reap the Cavaliers the No. 1 pick in next year’s draft. NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul FILE – In this June 7, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers guard Kyrie Irving (2) is guarded by Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) during the first half of Game 3 of basketball’s NBA Finals in Cleveland. Irving gets his new address and Isaiah Thomas gets to play with LeBron. They both can say they won in this Celtics-Cavs blockbuster deal. But the sum of the parts says Cleveland got the better of Boston in this swap of All-Star point guards. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, File)MIAMI— It’s not the principals that will define the blockbuster trade between Cleveland and Boston. Great point guard leaves one city for another. That seems fair.All the other parts, they will tell the story.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LATEST STORIES Minnesota never offered Andrew Wiggins. Miami never offered half its roster. Portland wasn’t giving up Damian Lillard. In the end the Cavs still got a star for a star, and since Thomas is only making about $6.3 million next season they got plenty of bonus parts as well to make the trade work.It also solved one big Cleveland problem.James’ only motivation is rings, and this move gives him just that.He will be looking to go to the Finals for the eighth consecutive year. Only three teams in NBA history have been to four straight finals — the Lakers, the Celtics, and the Miami Heat when James was with them. Golden State will be heavy favorites to join that club next June. The Cavaliers won’t surprise many if they join them.James will show up at camp in a couple of months and begin plotting ways to get his team back to the Finals. Had Irving still been there, James surely would have been wondering if they could make it work again. With Thomas, there won’t be a question. James and Thomas already have great respect for one another, and Thomas runs on the same prove-people-wrong gasoline that James uses.Cleveland has been through the free-agency-is-looming dance with James before, of course. If the Cavs want to keep him next summer, they simply have to go all-in to make him as happy as possible. This trade probably wasn’t a bad start on that front.In Boston, the Celtics will look very different this season.Irving and Hayward are in; Thomas, Crowder, Avery Bradley, Kelly Olynyk and Amir Johnson are out — meaning five of Boston’s seven top scorers from a No. 1 seed now play elsewhere.The Cavs weren’t overhauled; Irving is gone, Thomas, Derrick Rose and Jeff Green arrived.From a continuity standpoint, obvious edge to Cleveland as well. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side View comments LeBron James heads to Manila again on September 2 Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

HubSpot.TV Beta – Live Marketing Experiment Today

first_imgBelow are our actual show notes from Episode #1. They might not mean much to you, but maybe you can follow along, use the links, etc.  It also helps search engines index the content more easily, since they can’t tell what we’re saying in the video. Introductions – Karen Rubin and Mike Volpe from HubSpot We’ve been experimenting with a new concept… “live TV” at http://HubSpot.tv.  We all know that on the Internet, anyone can be a publisher with a blog, and it is easy to publish a video or audio podcast.  Now, you can even stream live video from your computer or even cell phone.  So we’re giving it a shot.  Karen Rubin (HubSpot Inbound Marketing Consultant) will be joining me for a rundown of recent marketing news.  And because this is web2.0, you can chat live with us and ask us questions, so you’re part of the show.  If you want a sample, we recorded our first (alpha) show for your viewing pleasure.  Check it out below, along with our show notes and links.Tune in today at 4:30pm EST at http://HubSpot.tv to our live broadcast and tell us what you think.Recorded HubSpot.TV – Episode #1 – August 8, 2008 Topics: Search Challenge Email as Most Popular Online Activity –http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/08/06/search-challenges-email-as-most-popular-daily-online-activity/ Olympic Marketing Tips from Colleen Coyne – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itFC-SkacFQ — http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/4261/8-Marketing-Tips-From-An-Olympic-Gold-Medalist.aspx Originally published Aug 14, 2008 2:30:00 PM, updated October 01 2019center_img Marketing News – McCain Campaign Ads go viral – “Obama Celebrity” ad gets 2m+ views http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHXYsw_ZDXg – Newer “Obama = God” ad up to almost 1m views http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mopkn0lPzM8 –Paris Hilton response to McCain ad… (as a promo for Funny or Die) –http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/64ad536a6d — BUT, is it having an effect?  What is it saying, really?  Is making fun of someone hurt them… or maybe help them? Sign off – What are you doing this weekend? Marketing Tip of the Week — Start a LinkedIn Group Forum Fodder — LinkedIn Groups – Are they great? Should you have one? How are we using them? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

7 Reasons Businesses Are the Future of Publishing

first_img Inbound Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack 5. 75% of U.S. Adults Unwilling to Pay For Online News- About three-quarters of respondents to the survey of 2,251 U.S. adults said they wouldn’t be willing to pay anything for online news if their newspapers failed to survive. ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) 2. Adults Don’t Pay for News On Tablets and Mobile Devices How people consume news and information is fundamentally changing. In a week that saw Twitter celebrate its fifth birthday and LinkedIn welcome its 100 millionth member, we take a look at the shifting information landscape and its implications for marketers. Photo Credit: 3. 47% of American Adults Get Local News On a Mobile Device- Nearly half of all American adults (47%) report that they get at least some local news and information on their cellphone or tablet computer. ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) Topics: 6. 65% of Mobile Connected American Adults Feel It Is Easier to Keep Up With News- 65% feel that today it is easier to keep up with information about their community than it was five years ago (vs. 47% of nonmobile connectors) ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) moriza This newest data continues to illustrate not only the rise of online media consumption, but also highlights its ubiquity thanks to mobile devices like smart phones and tablet computers. However, in a time when information is becoming an omnipresent commodity, something becomes scarce. In today’s online information age, attention is the new scarce resource. With news always around us, it is easy for people to experience an information overload. This scarce resource introduces new challenges and problems for marketers. – The graphic below illustrates the disconnect between adults that are currently paying for news and the growth of news consumption on mobile devices. This data shows that payment for news and information isn’t keeping pace with consumption. ( floor has dropped out 7. 47% of American Adults Use Their Cellphones and Tablet Computers to Get Local News and Information- ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) Marketing Takeaway Information consumption habits are clearly shifting. How islast_img read more

How to Use Hashtags on Twitter: A Simple Guide for Marketers

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack I’d pet a million stray pit bulls before I’d eat a single pink-slimy McBite. #McDStories bit.ly/wd0BDe— Laura Goldman (@lauragoldman) February 4, 2012 The takeaway here is to consider the other ways people could possibly interpret your hashtag. A fast food chain, especially one that has experienced controversy and negativity toward its brand in the past, should understand that it probably has quite a few naysayers willing to speak out against their brand.Step 4: Promote the Hashtag by Incorporating it Into Other Marketing ChannelsA hashtag is only useful if people know about it. So to start generating conversations through your hashtag, start adding it your existing resources and channels. For instance, every time we have a webinar, we add the event hashtag to our email reminder or follow-up communication, and the presenter reminds attendees of the hashtag at the beginning of the live webinar as well. Similarly, we add the hashtag to the social media sharing links we include on landing pages.Step 5: Don’t Hijack Hashtags for Sensitive Situations As we’ve covered in a previous blog post, hijacking hashtags designed for serious and sensitive issues can lead to some pretty bad consequences. Designer Kenneth Cole, for example, tried to insert his brand into conversations about the Egypt uproar by tweeting the following: Through this tweet, Kenneth Cole tried to hijack the #Cairo hashtag in attempt to promote his spring collection. His message was received with strong public disapproval and media criticism. As David Meerman Scott says, “Don’t attempt to piggyback on news when it conveys extremely negative information, such as people’s deaths.”Below is Twitter’s official stance when it comes to hashtag abuse. As you can see, there’s more at stake than just PR backlash …”The following behaviors and others like them could cause your account to be filtered from search, or even suspended:Adding one or more topic/hashtag to an unrelated tweet in an attempt to gain attention in search.Repeatedly tweeting the same topic/hashtag without adding value to the conversation in an attempt to get the topic trending/trending higher.Tweeting about each trending topic in turn in order to drive traffic to your profile, especially when mixed with advertising.Listing the trending topics in combination with a request to be followed.Tweeting about a trending topic and posting a misleading link to something unrelated.” Hashtags Topics:center_img Step 6: Keep it ShortBe sure to keep your hashtag short and easy to remember. Remember that Twitter users are only allotted 140 characters in each tweet, with or without a hashtag. By keeping the hashtag brief, you’ll save your audience some room to include more commentary about your content.What are some of the lessons you’ve learned from using Twitter hashtags? Share them with us in the comments! Every time we host live webinars (and as this long list suggests, that is quite often), quite a few attendees get confused about what to do with the hashtag we provide. What is it? What does it do? How do you create one? Let me explain!Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.What is a hashtag?A Twitter hashtag is simply a keyword phrase, spelled out without spaces, with a pound sign (#) in front of it. For example, #inboundchat and #ILoveChocolate are both hashtags.What does a hashtag do?A Twitter hashtag ties the conversations of different users into one stream, which you can find by searching the hastag in Twitter Search or by using a third-party monitoring tool such as HootSuite.So, if Twitter users who are not otherwise connected talk about the same topic using a specific hashtag, their tweets will appear in the same stream. In that way, Twitter hashtags solve a coordination issue and facilitate a conversation. Popular hashtagged words often become trending topics — topics so many people are talking about that they are a “trend.”Hashtags are great for centralizing conversations around live, in-person events or conferences, live webinars, or other marketing campaigns you’re running.How do you create a hashtag?Contrary to what you might think, you don’t need any tools to create a hashtag. Hashtags are simply text, and they can be placed in the beginning, middle, or end of a tweet. Just decide on the keyword you are targeting, place a pound sign in front of it, and you are all set! See the image below for an example:How to Use Hashtags on TwitterStep 1: Check If It’s NewAfter you decide on a keyword or a phrase, search for it. Visit Search.Twitter.com and enter your preferred hashtag in the search box. Did you get any results? Is someone else already using that hashtag for their event or campaign?If there is a lot of conversation around it already, you might want to revisit your decision and pick something that isn’t as frequently used. In that way, you will reduce the chances of people who are not a part of your target audience entering/diluting the conversation you want to take place.Step 2: Pick Industry or Brand KeywordsHashtags can also help communicate a message to those not actively searching for them. For example, if someone you’re following is tweeting about an event using a hashtag, you will still be able to see their updates in your main Twitter feed without accessing the entire hashtag conversation. In other words, you’ll be able to catch a glimpse of what they’re tweeting about and quickly connect the content of the tweet to the hashtag they’re using. And if the hashtag reflects an industry or branded keyword that is interesting to you, you might be inclined to check out the rest of the conversation happening around that hashtag, a win for the marketer who created it!Step 3: Be Careful With SentimentsA lot of politicians and big brands have experienced Twitter failure by choosing hashtags that include the word “love” in them. Love is a strong word, so if you are putting it in the mouth of your followers, make sure they really love you. Otherwise, they might turn against you and cause a major PR controversy. For instance, theMitt Romney Twitter campaign that sought to wish him a happy birthday also attracted quite a lot of critical comments. If you are just starting out, pick something neutral that simply reflects your topic or campaign.Furthermore, beware hashtag campaigns that have the potential of getting abused by users. The McDonald’s #McDStories hashtag campaign, which was launched as a way to share fun stories about people’s experience at McDonald’s, is a great example of a hashtag choice gone wrong. What McDonald’s didn’t foresee was people sharing negative stories about the McDonald’s brand, and that’s exactly what happened. Anyone who searched for “McDStories” were immediately met with thousands of tweets similar to the one below, which described awful experiences users had with McDonald’s. Originally published Apr 24, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017last_img read more

How Marketing Evolved Into Something People Actually Love [VISUAL]

first_img(Click on the visual for a full-sized version.) Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jul 26, 2012 12:30:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Inbound Marketing Topics: Marketing has come a long way. It used to be that we marketers had to rely on interruptive, outbound media like TV advertisements, billboards, cold calling, direct mail, and spammy email blasts to deliver our marketing messages.But the times … they’ve been a-changin’. With the evolution of the internet and other technologies to help consumers block out marketing messages that annoy and interrupt, those outbound strategies have lost their effectiveness. So today, savvy marketers rely on permissive, inbound techniques like remarkable content, search engine optimization, social media, and targeted email marketing to attract, nurture, and covert qualified prospects into customers. The result — and upside — of all this rapid change? Marketing that people actually love.And to illustrate exactly what we mean, we’ve whipped up this new visual. Check it out! Are you creating marketing that people love? Now’s as good a time as any to get started! last_img read more

Before & After: How to Fix These 7 Horrible Headlines

first_img Originally published Nov 15, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Blog Headlines Crafting headlines is the hardest part of the entire writing process. You’ve got to be descriptive, yet concise. Attention-grabbing, yet factual. Seach-engine friendly, yet catchy. Oh, and alliteration works well. And you’ve probably overused the word “awesome” or “amazing” — so find something better than that. To top it all off, it should also fit in under 140 characters so it’s easy to tweet. Yup, that’s hard. It’s so hard that my teammates and I on HubSpot’s blogging team never publish a post without brainstorming a headline with each other first. And even then, we might not get it right. So when I see a horrible, terrible, no-good headline published, I feel for the author or editor who labored over publishing it … but that doesn’t mean we can’t learn from their mistakes to make our own headlines better.To make this a learning experience — not a finger-pointing-fest — I compiled seven pretty bad headlines into the post below. We’ll dissect them and figure out why they’re ill-advised, and then make mental notes to avoid them in our own writing.  1) “15 Fears Everyone Has and No One Talks About”That was the headline I clicked on when I landed on the BuzzFeed homepage. I’m a huge scaredy-cat, so I was excited to see what other common fears people secretly shared based on the headline. I landed in the post and immediately started scrolling — I want to have my fears validated! This is what I see:And then they kept getting weirder and weirder. The fear of being left handed. The fear of beards. The fear of chins. What the heck? I thought these were supposed to be “fears that everyone has” — that’s what the headline promised me would be here.Annoyed, I scroll up and confront the headline on the article page: “12 Things You Won’t Believe People Are Afraid Of.” That’s completely different than what I was promised.In your own titles, don’t pull the headline bait-and-switch — even if it’s unintentional. I like to ask myself one question before publishing: “Is that really what the article is about?” If yes, I hit publish. If not, I go back to the headline drawing board. 2) “Ryan Seacrest to Go Viral All Over Kids With New Nickelodeon Show”When I first saw this title, I laughed out loud — and that’s not because Ryan Seacrest will be hosting a new game show where kids will be competing to win prizes by watching viral videos. Nor is it the fact that the phrase “go viral” is in the headline.Take a look at what follows “go viral” … what the heck is “going viral all over kids”? I thought it must be a weird pun that would be addressed in the article, but it wasn’t. It’s just this random phrase tacked on to the end of “go viral” that no one says … ever. And now that it’s been added on to the end of “go viral”, the whole title sounds grotesque and inappropriate. When you’re writing titles, be 100% sure what you’re saying actually means what you’re saying. Certain words and phrases mean certain things in certain contexts. If you really need a gut check, IM or email a coworker with the title and zero context and ask them what their thoughts are. Better safe than sorry.3) “MagicMomentsProm.com Advises Teens to Look to Celebrities for the Perfect Prom Dress Styles and Where to Turn for a More Affordable Choice”One of the best grammar lessons I learned was about parallel structure. Basically, if you’re going to have two phrases in a sentence, they should follow the same structure. It’s mostly about having the same verb tense, but you can get fancier by aligning other elements of the phrase. When you break the parallel structure rule, compound sentences end up sounding awkward … like really awkward. Take the above title from a press release, for example. Read it one time and tell me what the article is going to be about. Teens should take celebrity advice for prom dress styles? Teens should find someone to help them find a cheap prom dress? It’s super confusing because the article is supposed to address both.Here’s how I’d rewrite the title to get that dual message across: “MagicMomentsProm.com Advises Teens To Look To Celebrities For The Perfect (and Affordable) Prom Dress Styles.” Much clearer, right?You’ve heard this lesson for your entire life, and you’ll hear it again in this blog post: Grammar is important. It’s not the be-all-end-all of content creation, but it should be used to help clarify your message, not muddle it.4) “Under Investigation”I’m going to let you try this one on your own. The header above was the headline I saw, and here’s the context in which I saw it in the sidebar of The Huffington Post: What the heck is that post about? Who is under investigation? And what for? Glenn Greenwald? Maybe it’s just me being ignorant of what’s happening in the world, but I don’t even recognize who the man in the picture is.Here’s what the title is once I click through: UK Pursuing Criminal Investigation Into Guardian Leaks. OH. Now that makes sense!Lesson for us: Never sacrifice the meaning of your headline for being concise. I had no clue what that post was about and I definitely wouldn’t have clicked through unless I was writing this blog post about confusing titles. Don’t assume that your readers will just get it — I’d bet that 9/10 times, they’re going to keep scrolling. 5) “Facebook Like Button, Viewed 22B Times a Day on 7.5M Websites, Gets a Redesign”This title from TechCrunch isn’t one of the worst I’ve ever seen — it’s pretty straightforward and clickable. But it does have one pretty giant weak spot.Check out that descriptive phrase right smack dab in the middle of the headline: “Viewed 22B Times a Day on 7.5M Websites.” Yep, those numbers are impressive … but they’re describing Facebook, the biggest social network of our age. We don’t really need a qualifier to understand how gargantuan Facebook is — so cut it from your headline. If you’re adding data, adjectives, or any clarifier to your titles that don’t really need to be there, cut it out. Since you have limited space in your title for it to appear in search and social networks, use it wisely. 6) “California Pinots to Beat Blockbusters: John Mariani”Is this a spam post randomly compiling words together like the “What would I say app?” that’s been taking the internet by storm? And who the heck is John Mariani? This article is on Bloomberg — shouldn’t it be good? I was just really confused when I saw this.The main problem with this headline is that it comes across as quite randomly put together, and name drops someone who isn’t recognizable to someone who’s a big wine fan (cough me cough). Instead, Bloomberg should remove Mariani’s name from the title, and try to position the California Pinots as the underdog so that “beating blockbusters” makes sense — and makes you want to click. It also confuses a reader by having two recognizable names — “pinots” and “blockbusters” — close to one another but with no discernible relation. Are Pinots and Blockbusters in a fight? Why is wine fighting with an old video rental chain? The problem is compounded because “beat” can be used as both a noun and a verb. Are the pinots beating up the video store? Or are “Beat Blockbusters” a thing I should know about that lie on a spectrum which runs the gamut from “California Pinots” to “Beat Blockbusters”?If i was going to redo this title, I’d probably nix the word “blockbusters” entirely, as it takes the mind to another place that the article doesn’t intend you to go. (And it’s not the right place.)7) “Stop Wasting Away Your Workday With These Productivity Tools and Techniques”And of course, we couldn’t end this post without adding one of our own titles into the mix. Like I said before, it happens to all of us. So here’s a title of a recent post that flopped.It’s confusing … right? It seems like we were telling you to NOT use these productivity tools and techniques because they make you waste time, but in fact, we really wanted you to use them to save time. The reason it’s confusing is the word choice, “with.” Once we realized our mistake, we switched up the phrasing to say, “Productivity Tools and Techniques to Stop Wasting Away Your Workday.” Clearer, right?The lesson: Really think about your word placement — something as simple as switching the phrases in a headline can add clarity, or mystery, to your headline. If you’re straightforward yet compelling, you’re going to be set for any headline you write. Think about what you’ve said in the post (yup, I’m recommending writing your title after you write your post) — and think about how you’d get your buyer persona to read the article in five seconds or less.What terrible headlines have you seen, and how would you fix them? Share them with us in the comments.  Topics:last_img read more

How to Lose Money on Your Ecommerce Site This Holiday Season

first_img Originally published Dec 20, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 This post originally appeared on Inbound Ecommerce, a new section of Inbound Hub. Subscribe here to read more content like this from Inbound Ecommerce.With your marketing dollars driving traffic to your ecommerce site this holiday season, you may think you can sit back and watch all the new customers roll in.Early estimates suggest $82 billion will be spent this year for online purchases alone. With so much money funneling toward ecommerce, losing money seems impossible. If, however, you’re determined to experience a loss this season, here’s how to do it.Guaranteed Ways To Lose MoneyForget PersonalizationPour money into a website that doesn’t capture customer information through cookies or registration forms. If your only goal is to get customers to your site for the holiday season, there’s no reason to follow up with them anyway, right? Who cares about personalization when those customers will only see your site once?Everyone who’s going to buy is going to buy on their first visit, so there’s no need to make the experience grow more valuable over time.On With the SpamCreate broad, follow-up email messages to send to any customers who managed to leave their email addresses.Without capturing any information on your site, you won’t know what your customers purchased anyway, so how could you possibly segment the emails and send out targeted messages … right?More Customers, Less SatisfactionPut plenty of money into PPC ads but never mind about retargeted ads. If you’re only worried about getting people to your site the first time (and 73% of ecommerce conversions come from first-time visitors, so you can bet you’re not alone), a retargeted ad won’t be much help. Don’t Dare to Be DifferentFocus more on driving customers to your page than on providing your unique value proposition.There may be plenty of competitors out there selling the same thing you’re selling, but you don’t need to convince buyers that your company is better at service and quality, as long as you’ve got more visitors coming along later.Give It AwayPay no attention to the cost of your offers. By giving free shipping for every customer who makes a purchase, you’ll sell more than any of your competitors.Buyers are more likely to abandon a shopping cart if the price of shipping is too high, so you should simply eliminate shipping costs for customers altogether, regardless of how much you’ll pay in the end.Set Them FreeIf a potential customer abandons their shopping cart, just let them go. If they come back to you, it was meant to be. At least, that’s how over 80% of the top 1,000 companies feel. If this mentality is good enough for them, it’s good enough for you, too.Contact Forms Protect Your PrivacyDon’t worry about providing contact information on your website. If people want to get in touch with you, they can just fill out another contact form. After all, if they’re trying to get in touch with you, it probably means they have a complaint, and complaints often mean returns and refunds.With this plan in place, you’ll be well on your way to logging a 9% loss. Never mind the fact that 99% of first-time visitors don’t plan to buy anything anyway. Those who do make a purchase cost you so much money just getting them there that you have no way to recover the loss.The above was all written with tongue firmly in cheek — but that doesn’t mean it’s untrue. By focusing all your attention on traffic and first-time sales, you could actually lose money.Without customer retention, it’s easy to see how you could lose money this holiday season — even with $82 billion spent for online purchases. So what can you do to see revenue growth?Now Let’s Make MoneyThe key to turning a profit with your ecommerce site is customer retention. Getting that first sale is great, but you want to develop and foster a great customer relationship.As you can see from the chart below, repeat customers average higher orders and cost nothing for acquisition. You do, however, need to focus your attention on a few things to make sure those customers want to return for future purchases.Keep Your PromisesWhen convincing those buyers to make their purchases from your ecommerce site, you likely made plenty of promises. You better deliver a quality product as quickly as you can, without any hidden fees or tricks. Be Available Whether it’s by email, social media, instant chat, or phone, make yourself available to all customers. Your customer service at this time is more important than any of the tactics you used to get those customers to your site in the first place.Give Buyers a VoiceReach out after the sale to ask for reviews. Those reviews can help in more ways than one. You give your buyers a voice when you allow them to share their experiences on your site, which makes them feel important. They will appreciate that chance to tell others about their experience.You’ll also have that social proof that first-time visitors look for when visiting your site. As an added bonus, reviews and testimonials help your SEO by directing buyers to your site for information instead of a third-party site.Go After Abandoned CartsYou don’t have to be like 80% of the companies out there. If you send out those emails, 72% of those who return to make a purchase will do so within the first 12 hours. Within two weeks, 100% of those who return with the intention of making a purchase will do so. That means you still have time to recover those buyers before the big day.Be RelevantYour email campaigns should include only relevant material. Show your first-time customers that you’ll be responsible with the information they shared when making their purchase.Segmentation of your contact lists is the only way to make sure buyers are getting emails that appeal to them instead of broad topics that will be counted as spam.Show ThanksMost of all, thank your buyers for the sale. You may be surprised at how far genuine appreciation can go.Why is all this customer service so important? Because repeat customers are the only way you’ll make money off this holiday season. We all want to see big numbers for holiday spending this season, but if you’re not recovering your investment into customer acquisition, those numbers will mean nothing for your company’s success.What are your thoughts on these tips to capitalize this holiday season? Got any tips of your own? Share ’em in the comments below! Ecommerce Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! 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