Finally! Google Updates PageRank: Here’s The Real Scoop From 139,000 Websites

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 25, 2007 11:54:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Google Updates If you’re involved in Internet Marketing, chances are, you have read the news about the recent updates Google has made to it’s Toolbar PageRank number (this is the publicly available PageRank number). Much of the current discussion has been the loss of PageRank by some high-profile sites in articles like “Digg Favorites Slapped by Google” and “Google changing the PageRank Algorithm?”  There has also been a fair amount of speculation as to the cause of this PageRank loss for these popular (and in many cases, highly regarded) websites.(For those of you who don’t know what Google PageRank is, check out The Importance of Google PageRank.)The most common speculation is that these sites lost PageRank because they were selling links, and that this is a “penalty” being imposed by Google rather than just a “normal” update of PageRank. I don’t have a strong opinion (yet) as to whether this was indeed the cause, but I do have some facts related to this recent news. As it turns out, we have access to the Google PageRank data for over 139,000 websites.  This data was collected via our free SEO tool called Website Grader.  Website Grader looks at a number of factors about a website as part of its evaluation — including Google PageRank.So, here are some of the insights drawn from this database. Disclaimer: The following was derived from some quick database queries and should be used for amusement purposes only. I’m not going to try and defend the points below. You don’t have to believe me.  Also, I’d suggest using some of the numbers shown as relative measures indicating trends — not absolute numbers you’d hang your hat on.What You Can Learn About PageRank From 139,000 Websites1) Contrary to what some believe, this recent update did not just reduce PageRank for some number of websites. There were sites that have increased in PageRank as a result of the recent update. A quick scan showed at least a handful of sites with PR5 or higher than rose to PR6 or higher. (As you would expect, there were also improvements in PageRank for a lot of lower ranked sites as well).2) Overall, the average PageRank (across all sites) seems to bounce around a little. If we ignore sites with PageRank 0, the average PageRank for the home page of websites submitted to Website Grader was around 4.59 in March 2007. This increased to about 4.77 in April 2007. Coincidentally, there was a Google PageRank update in that month. I always suspected that the April update was reasonably “liberal” in its allocation of PageRank, now the data seems to back it up. Note: Technically, PageRank is assigned to individual URLs (not websites). What we tracking is the PageRank of the home/default page of a website as that is what most people talk about as a measure of the overall weight of their website with search engines.3) Currently, the average PageRank is about 4.22 in October 2007  (it was 4.16 in September 2007). So, it would seem to me that there has been a drift downward in PageRank overall since the peak back in April.Dharmesh Shah contributed heavily to this article.  In fact, he might have even posted it himself if he were not locked in the basement writing code for HubSpot right now.  (To any law enforcement officials reading this, don’t worry, he is not being held captive against his will.  He has a big smile on his face and is working on “really cool stuff”.) Topics:last_img read more

HubSpot.TV Beta – Live Marketing Experiment Today

first_imgBelow are our actual show notes from Episode #1. They might not mean much to you, but maybe you can follow along, use the links, etc.  It also helps search engines index the content more easily, since they can’t tell what we’re saying in the video. Introductions – Karen Rubin and Mike Volpe from HubSpot We’ve been experimenting with a new concept… “live TV” at http://HubSpot.tv.  We all know that on the Internet, anyone can be a publisher with a blog, and it is easy to publish a video or audio podcast.  Now, you can even stream live video from your computer or even cell phone.  So we’re giving it a shot.  Karen Rubin (HubSpot Inbound Marketing Consultant) will be joining me for a rundown of recent marketing news.  And because this is web2.0, you can chat live with us and ask us questions, so you’re part of the show.  If you want a sample, we recorded our first (alpha) show for your viewing pleasure.  Check it out below, along with our show notes and links.Tune in today at 4:30pm EST at http://HubSpot.tv to our live broadcast and tell us what you think.Recorded HubSpot.TV – Episode #1 – August 8, 2008 Topics: Search Challenge Email as Most Popular Online Activity –http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/08/06/search-challenges-email-as-most-popular-daily-online-activity/ Olympic Marketing Tips from Colleen Coyne – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itFC-SkacFQ — http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/4261/8-Marketing-Tips-From-An-Olympic-Gold-Medalist.aspx Originally published Aug 14, 2008 2:30:00 PM, updated October 01 2019center_img Marketing News – McCain Campaign Ads go viral – “Obama Celebrity” ad gets 2m+ views http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHXYsw_ZDXg – Newer “Obama = God” ad up to almost 1m views http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mopkn0lPzM8 –Paris Hilton response to McCain ad… (as a promo for Funny or Die) –http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/64ad536a6d — BUT, is it having an effect?  What is it saying, really?  Is making fun of someone hurt them… or maybe help them? Sign off – What are you doing this weekend? Marketing Tip of the Week — Start a LinkedIn Group Forum Fodder — LinkedIn Groups – Are they great? Should you have one? How are we using them? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

The Science of Social Media [Video]

first_img Stuff like ‘engage in the conversation’ or ‘hug your followers.’ It’s good sounding advice, and hard to disagree with. He says, “I am not going to tell you to punch your customers in the face. The problem is that it’s not based on anything more substantial than what ‘feels right’ typically”. Dan likes to get beyond the unicorns and rainbows, into the real data, the real social media scientist, Dan Zarrella visited Harvard this week and shared some of his research about Originally published Jan 28, 2011 3:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 HubSpot on as it applies to marketing.  Dan attends many events where  people share social media advice and most of it is what he calls ‘unicorns and rainbows.’ Vimeo the science of social media Check out the video below for Dan’s full presentation at Harvard. What do you think about the data he presents? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img Topics: . about why people behave the way they do online and how marketers can leverage that behavior. from HubSpot’s The Science of Social Media Social Media Video science of social medialast_img read more

7 Reasons Businesses Are the Future of Publishing

first_img Inbound Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack 5. 75% of U.S. Adults Unwilling to Pay For Online News- About three-quarters of respondents to the survey of 2,251 U.S. adults said they wouldn’t be willing to pay anything for online news if their newspapers failed to survive. ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) 2. Adults Don’t Pay for News On Tablets and Mobile Devices How people consume news and information is fundamentally changing. In a week that saw Twitter celebrate its fifth birthday and LinkedIn welcome its 100 millionth member, we take a look at the shifting information landscape and its implications for marketers. Photo Credit: 3. 47% of American Adults Get Local News On a Mobile Device- Nearly half of all American adults (47%) report that they get at least some local news and information on their cellphone or tablet computer. ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) Topics: 6. 65% of Mobile Connected American Adults Feel It Is Easier to Keep Up With News- 65% feel that today it is easier to keep up with information about their community than it was five years ago (vs. 47% of nonmobile connectors) ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) moriza This newest data continues to illustrate not only the rise of online media consumption, but also highlights its ubiquity thanks to mobile devices like smart phones and tablet computers. However, in a time when information is becoming an omnipresent commodity, something becomes scarce. In today’s online information age, attention is the new scarce resource. With news always around us, it is easy for people to experience an information overload. This scarce resource introduces new challenges and problems for marketers. – The graphic below illustrates the disconnect between adults that are currently paying for news and the growth of news consumption on mobile devices. This data shows that payment for news and information isn’t keeping pace with consumption. ( floor has dropped out 7. 47% of American Adults Use Their Cellphones and Tablet Computers to Get Local News and Information- ( This data comes from a recent Pew Internet Study available here.) Marketing Takeaway Information consumption habits are clearly shifting. How islast_img read more

Instagram Loses 25% of its Daily Active Users, and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img2012 is wrapping up, and 2013 is cruising in, full speed ahead! Have you gotten your marketing plan all sorted out to start the new year off with a bang?We’d like to help you out by sharing these top marketing stories of the week so you can get your marketing plan in order and catch up on what you might have missed over the holidays.But we also know that coming up with your 2013 marketing plan — including your strategy, goals, and schedule — is way easier said than done. So how about we lend you a hand? Please feel free to submit a request to talk with one of our inbound marketing specialists, and we’ll be happy to run through your plans for 2013.What do you say? Are you ready to hop in and read about the top marketing stories this week? Let’s get started!Google+ Now Allows Pages to Interact With All Users, Analytics Coming SoonBefore I give you this little recap, just hold on one second while I … YAHOOOO! Okay, now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s get into exactly what this new update means for Google+ Business Page owners. Previously, Google+ Pages could only +1, share, or comment on posts from users who had already added the page to one of their Circles. But now, Google+ Pages can interact with any post from any user without these Circle limitations. A-mazing. This opens up so many doors for marketers wishing to grow their reach and generate more leads through Google+. Remember this update while you’re monitoring brand mentions and interactions on Google+, because now you’ll want to take a peek at specific hashtags (just as you would on Twitter) and Google+ Communities as well.+1 for better Google+ engagement! But how about that second part of the announcement, marketers?! How long have we been asking for Google+ analytics? Um, probably since the moment the platform launched business pages back in November, 2011. According to Google+’s “Measure” page, Google+ explains, “Data trumps guessing every time. That’s why in the coming weeks, we will be launching tools to give you access to as much data as possible about your Google+ Page and +1 activity.” Google+, you had us at “data trumps guessing.” The page activity data will include information about who’s interacting with your page (and how), your users’ demographics, and information about their social activities (this includes +1’s, shares, and comments). Now, not only is Google+ a great SEO booster and internal business tool, but it’s also coming through as an excellent platform to help you market your brand, become a thought leader in your industry, and successfully measure your results. If you’d like to learn more about these new Google+ updates, read the full story here.Gangnam Style Makes YouTube History: First Video to Hit 1 Billion Views, From The YouTube BlogBy now, you must have heard PSY’s “Gangnam Style” — a song that completely blew up the internet and has now officially amassed 1 billion views on YouTube. The music video was YouTube’s top rising search of 2012, and on October 6th, there were more than 5 million searches for the term “gangnam style” in a single day. Absolutely incredible!Back in September, we fell in love with “Gangnam Style” ourselves and released a parody of our own called “Inbound Style.” Before creating this parody, we took some tips from marketing strategist and author David Meerman Scott about how to newsjack our way into the media. He even had a cameo in our parody video — see if you can spot him here. The original video was catchy, hilarious, and easy to parody, which is why it went completely viral. Do you want to create a viral video to help your marketing in 2013? You might want to take some pointers from PSY! To see more “Gangnam Style” stats, check out the full post on YouTube’s blog here.A New Year Brings New Marketing Opportunities: Complementary Marketing ConsultationWhat are your marketing resolutions for 2013? Do you want to create a viral video like “Gangnam Style?” Increase your blogging frequency? Automate some of your social media posts? I’m sure you’ve already got a great list piling up, but that list can seem awfully daunting if you’re not sure where to start or how to focus your marketing efforts. That’s where HubSpot comes in! We’d love to chat with you about your plan (or possibly lack thereof) for 2013 to help you get more out of your marketing budget, determine how you stack up against competitors, send more traffic to your website, and more! Just let us know what you want to talk about and what you’re hoping to achieve in 2013. We’re ready to answer your toughest marketing questions. So fire away! Ready to zero in on those marketing goals? Submit your request to chat with a HubSpot inbound marketing specialist about your marketing right here.Why Instagram’s Reported Drop in Daily Users Is Probably Not Due to Terms Of Service “Revolt,” From Marketing LandYou might recall last week’s marketing round-up post where we mentioned Instagram’s updated privacy policy, which led to some serious backlash from users — which then led to a rollback and replacement of the originally publicized privacy policy. Well, it turns out that Instagram recently lost 25% of its daily active users (DAU). Wow! Without any further information, one would assume this loss is due to the new privacy policy update and the uproar that came from it. But when you look at the data, the “revolt” took about a week to show a noticeable decrease in DAU. And with the announcement around December 17th, a week later would put us at December 24th: Christmas Eve. Interesting. But there’s even more data to consider. Flickr’s DAU recently increased from 30,000 to 60,000 (as compared to Instagram’s 16,400,000 to 12,400,000). So did Instagram’s users flock to Flickr? It’s possible.Data is great, but the marketing takeaway here is that the way you analyze data can make a huge difference in how you move forward with your efforts. If Instagram had only considered the data gathered during the “revolt,” they would have completely missed the fact that Christmas could have played into the DAU data. Just remember that data shows the facts, but you have to connect the dots. If you’re interested in seeing more data regarding the Instagram “revolt,” take a look at the full post here.Randi Zuckerberg Not Happy About Facebook Photo Privacy Breach, From MashableOver the holidays, Randi Zuckerberg, the former head of marketing for Facebook, posted a photo on Facebook (how fitting!) of her family goofing around with the new Poke app. Sounds like a pretty normal thing any Facebook user might do, right? Well, this photo was posted to a private group of Facebook friends, but was somehow found circulating around Twitter, the blogosphere, and other unexpected places.Awkward.Randi was not happy about this discovery and got caught publicly complaining about a Facebook privacy breach. Oh, the irony! In reality, another member of the group had taken the picture and posted it to Twitter. Of course, Randi then covered up her complaint by sending a tweet that said, “Digital etiquette: always ask permission before posting a friend’s photo publicly. It’s not about privacy settings, it’s about human decency.” Whether you agree with Randi, or you’re siding with the idea that this is a privacy policy issue, we can all take an important marketing lesson away from this debacle. Don’t steal people’s content on the internet. Are you taking steps to ensure you give credit where credit’s due with shared content on the internet? It’s something to seriously think about when implementing your 2013 marketing plan. Would you like to read more about the Zuckerberg photo controversy? Read the full story here.Did you come across any other interesting marketing stories over the holidays? Share them in the comments below!Image credit: Porto Bay Hotels & Resorts Events Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Instagram Marketing Originally published Dec 30, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016last_img read more

Why You Can’t Resist Clicking on This Article: The Clickbait Conundrum

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Most people have the same experience with clickbait.You stumble across it in your Facebook feed or Twitter feed. It reads, “13 Problems Every Blonde Bostonian Working at a Marketing Software Company Has.” You recognize it’s pandering to you … but it’s just so perfectly intriguing, you have to click. You click, resigning yourself to scrolling through for just a minute because you’ve got work to do. You get to the first list item — it’s roughly on point, so you continue.Download 195+ visual marketing design templates to use for social media posts, infographics, and more. Suddenly, 10 minutes go by — you’ve scrolled through the whole article and realized it’s a load of crap that was meant to waste your time. You hate yourself a little. You get back to work, telling yourself you won’t get duped again. You’re too smart for that … but sure enough, an hour later, the whole clickbait-shame cycle continues. Don’t be upset — it’s happened to pretty much everyone. Clickbait has been around for over a century, and it’s remained a common tactic for content creators because it works. As a content creator, it’s one of those ethical grey areas you have to navigate. To help you figure out which side of the clickbait debate you fall on, we put together this post — hopefully, by giving you some background into the history, science, and ethics of clickbait, you can make a decision on how you’re going to create content for your company. A Brief History of ClickbaitClickbait isn’t something BuzzFeed, Upworthy, Viralnova, Distractify, or any other viral content site invented. It’s been around for over 100 years. If you want a more in-depth version of clickbait history, check out this post on io9 — below’s the quick and dirty version. Back in the late 1800s, newspapers were really concerned with increasing their circulation numbers (kinda like the way most media companies care about pageviews today). One easy way to increase circulation was to have a popular comic strip that pandered to the largest number of people — people would buy the paper to read those cartoons, not hard news. One such comic was all about the adventures of Yellow Kid — a poor kid from the slums wearing a yellow nightshirt who’d say weird things, kinda like modern day LOLcats. Like this:Like today, people got up-in-arms about journalism being tainted by the Yellow Kid inflating circulation, and the term “yellow journalism” was born. Since then, media companies have all used “yellow journalism” techniques to get more people reading their content. And sometimes it’s had disastrous effects. But the moral of the story here is that clickbait is nothing new — technology and the increasing amount of content on the web has just made it much more prevalent. And for the people using it to get more views and comments on their posts, it’s working. Why You Click on ClickbaitEven though you know a headline is just clickbait, it’s tough to resist — your brain is programmed to click on it. Why? It all boils down to curiosity. Studies have shown that curiosity is a cognitive form of deprivation from realizing you have a gap in your knowledge. And when you have that deprivation, you’re gonna try really really hard to reverse it. So when you’re presented with a title that makes you curious — something like, “This 4-Year-Old Decided to High-Five Every Person They Passed on the Street That Day. You’ll Never Guess What Happened.” — you’re overcome with a desire to click on it. Even if you guess that pretty much every person will high-five the four-year-old back (seriously, who wouldn’t high-five a four-year-old?) … you’ve got to click to make sure. But how do content creators get people to be curious enough about their content to click? They’ve got to make the most of their headline — and research from a professor and a communications staffer at BI Norwegian Business School suggests piquing interest in headlines all boils down to asking questions that reference the reader. Forbes describes the experiment as this:”They tested three kinds of headlines: One was a simple declarative headline. Example: “The hunt for status in the advertising business.” Another posed a question: “Why are advertisers so obsessed with winning prices?” They also contrasted simple headlines like “Power corrupts,” with self-referencing headlines like “Is your boss intoxicated by power?” They got on average 150% more clicks for the question headlines and 175% more clicks for the headlines that used the second person. One caveat: The question headlines used more enticing words, like “obsessed” and “intoxicated,” than the simple declarative headlines.”So the reason you can’t help but click on clickbait is simple: It’s piquing your curiosity, usually through a question, a self-referential comment, or both. Media companies and content creators know this already. But should they use your brain against you?The Ethics of Clickbait There’s been lots of discussion on the internet about clickbait. Some for, some against. Some just poking fun at it. And I hate to spoil the end of this post, but there’s really no answer to the whole debate. People are still going to click on clickbait — they have for over a century, and my guess is that they’ll continue to do it. Heck, they’ll probably share the clickbait, too, whether or not they realize what it is they’ve fallen for. It’s up to you to decide if you want to go the clickbait route or not. Maybe you’ll do whatever your company asks. Some companies already have policies and metrics in place to reward or play down clickbait. Some companies have already decided to play into the clickbait because sheer volume of unique visitors is their main metric. Some have decided to take a modified approach, rewarding writers for getting repeat visitors, not just uniques. For someone trying to stay employed, you’ll probably choose something aligned with your company’s policies. But still, there’s a personal responsibility to either embrace clickbait in all of its pandering glory or eschew it in favor of “higher quality” content.In my opinion, neither of these is a better path. As long as the headline accurately describes the piece inside, and the piece inside is a quality piece of content (which is a whole other debate), you’re serving your audience the right way.You just need to ask yourself one question: What will you do for a click?What do you think about the clickbait debate? Do you use clickbait headlines in your marketing? Weigh in in the comments below. Image credit: Upworthy, io9 Topics: Originally published Jun 12, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Marketing Psychologylast_img read more

Are You Emotionally Intelligent? 5 of the Tell-Tale Signs

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Sep 12, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Emotional Intelligence I’ve always been fascinated with the idea of emotional intelligence — the ability to absorb emotional cues and use it to guide behavior. And the more time I spend in business (marketing and editorial, in particular) the more it’s clear what a valuable asset this is in your employees and teammates.Think about how valuable it is when creating content, for example: Those who are able to empathize with their readers are able to think of hot topics, write in a way that draws on common experiences, and anticipate questions and hangups so they can address them in the writing.Even if you’re not in marketing or creating content on a regular basis, knowing the signs of emotional intelligence are critical for one more reason: hiring. If you want to build a team of people that are able to recognize and make choices based on their own emotions and those of their peers, you’ll need to be able to screen for emotional intelligence alongside subject matter expertise and specific skill sets during the interview process. If you’re wondering how you can identify an emotionally intelligent person (or whether you or your coworkers pass the emotional intelligence test), consider these common qualities.A Quick Note on Emotional IntelligenceThis is a cursory look into emotional intelligence and its role in the workplace, based largely (though not exclusively) on research from Salovey and Mayer, and Goleman, a few of the recognized leaders in this field of research. For a more in-depth look into emotional intelligence in the work environment, I recommend reading:Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQWorking With Emotional IntelligenceEmotional Intelligence: Key Readings on the Mayer and Salovey Model1) An emotionally intelligent person is curious …About people he doesn’t know, specifically. There’s no “rational” reason to care about a complete stranger … but you probably don’t want to work alongside people that don’t. That’s because those who are curious about other people are typically more empathetic than their ambivalent peers — another sign of high emotional intelligence.One way to screen for it in an interview:When you mention a project you’re working on, does he ask specific and engaging follow-up questions, or does he just nod his head or say something generic? 2) An emotionally intelligent person is self aware …One of the hallmarks of high emotional intelligence is not just the ability to recognize signals and emotions in others — it’s the ability to read ourselves with similar (or hopefully, greater) levels of depth and accuracy. Growing a self aware team can help teammates recognize where they can work together, make feedback easier to give and receive, and help everyone have a more trusting working relationship.One way to screen for it in an interview:When asking the typical “what’s your weakness” question, ask him to explain ways he compensates for it. This indicates that he’s thought at length about where he needs help, so much so that he’s found ways to ask for it, work on improving, or find other support systems. That’s a sign of someone that constantly self-evaluates, and can deal with what they uncover in the process.3) An emotionally intelligent person is self motivated …Self-motivated individuals are a treat to work with and manage. Because they’re typically rewarded less by outside stimuli — recognition, bonuses, promotions — and more by their own goals and interests, they can handle disappointment and negative outcomes well due to their bigger-picture, long-term outlook. One way to screen for it in an interview:Ask her the last thing she taught herself. If she’s self-motivated, she likely enjoys learning and education because she knows the fulfillment of self-improvement — and is happy to lead the charge in that endeavor.4) An emotionally intelligent person is well-liked …Let me be clear: Not everybody needs to like you. In fact, that can be considered a red flag to some. However, emotionally intelligent people are often well-liked. Not popular, necessarily, but well-liked. That’s because they have people skills, have garnered the respect of their peers/managers/employees in various ways both personal and professional, and as a result, people enjoy working with them.One way to screen for it in an interview:Anyone can scrounge up three references. Ask them: “If I asked you for five more references other than the ones you gave me, who would you refer?” If they can list those people quickly, that’s a good sign that they’re easy to work with, well respected by many, and people just plain like ’em.5) An emotionally intelligent person is empathetic …We’ve talked a lot about empathy, so it’s high time we called it out directly on this list: Emotionally intelligent people are empathetic, and it’s a skill you should look for when hiring. Personally, I think of this as the basis for high emotional intelligence — you have to be able to understand other people’s points of view, even if you don’t have a lot of firsthand experience (or any firsthand experience) to draw from. Those who are able to feel empathy for the people with whom they work are better able to respond in constructive ways — particularly in tough situations — and even anticipate their teammates’, subordinates’, or manager’s needs.One way to screen for it in an interview:Ask for her to explain an instance in which she had to deal with someone difficult, angry, or just plain wrong. If she was able to find common ground with that person, she might be a highly empathetic person.Sources: ASAECenter.org, Inc., HelpGuide.org, My personal opinion (just kidding)last_img read more