Joanna Aizenberg elected fellow of the American Physical Society

first_imgJoanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).A pioneer in studying how living things create inorganic materials, and what those biological processes might teach engineers, Aizenberg plays many critical roles across Harvard. In addition to her position at SEAS, she is professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; director of the Science Program for the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; co-director of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology; and a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.Awarded on the recommendation of the APS’ Division of Condensed Matter Physics, the fellowship recognizes Aizenberg’s “research in biomineralization and the control of templated nucleation and growth of crystals.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

We’re doing fine . . .

first_img 65SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Joseph Brancucci Mr. Brancucci is the first President of the CUSO, CU RateReset, owned primarily by Mortgage Harmony (dba RateReset) and PenFed. Prior to joining CU Rate Reset, Mr. Brancucci was the … Web: curatereset.com Details The three words that define future mediocrity are “we’re doing fine”.  It would be difficult to dispute that the financial world has changed dramatically over the years, and today the speed of change has accelerated significantly. The industry continues to gain members, make loans and see asset growth – but is that a measure or indicator of future success?Over a four-decade career in financial services I have witnessed, experienced and participated in transformational change.  The conversations around emerging technology like the ATM caused industry debate – consumers would never use a machine to make a withdrawal from their account.  Credit cards not tied to a specific gasoline brand, local merchant or one of the giants of the catalogue sales world – Montgomery Wards, Sears and that upstart JC Penney – would never be accepted.  Consumers would never do their banking over the telephone, and of course never accept online banking – remember the first versions using a floppy disk? And checks would always be the only way, other than cash, to pay for things (bill pay, PayPal, debit cards and other payment methods…all have dispelled that). Mortgages require lots of manual processes and take weeks, maybe months to close (DU/LP, Prime Alliance, Mortgage Bot, Ellie Mae, and now the Rocket Mortgage have changed that – mortgage approval in minutes, closing in days).Many industries and well-known brands have succumbed to change because they believed that “we’re doing fine.” I would contend that what those words really mean is – we have so much we are doing to maintain great member service and keep the integrity of our operations in good order that we don’t have the time to embrace innovation and change. Today we are faced with numerous challenges. Five or six generations of consumers in the marketplace and four generations in the work force. Regulators and the CFPB are burdening the traditional banking model while new entrants into the marketplace are free of legacy systems and regulatory constraints. Investment in now obsolete systems and real estate make moving forward slower than the speed of change.We should be concerned about the FinTechs.  They are not a fad nor are they going away.  They are very well capitalized, and they have revolutionized how to leverage big data in ways we can only dream of.  They have challenged credit score lending structures by leveraging their ability to engineer data.  They are mobile optimized, in fact they are mobile prevalent, and they strive for immediate decisions and funding.  Where traditional lenders are still caught up in past practices making it difficult to refinance student debt, underwrite small business loans in minutes, grant signature loans at the point of purchase, or embrace new credit models, the FinTechs are quickly gaining ground in market share because they can do those things today. They have reinvented what is a “common bond community” and some even call their customers – members.  Just as important, they have big dollars to spend on marketing and their messaging is so on point that the consumer believes all lending is quick and painless.  So how do we leap over, not only today’s model, but the FinTech phenomena?  The answer is both simple and painful.  Take the burden of innovation off of the overworked, thinly stretched operational teams, and create a team with Executive Team leadership status responsible for reimagining a new business model.  I am not suggesting losing our identity or our passion for doing right by our members and communities.  I am saying it is time to redesign how we deliver solutions to solve member needs, while maintaining a level of intimacy with our members that we actually have been losing over time. It is also time to reimagine our cooperative effort to solve challenges.Numerous times I have met with a credit union and had them identify their four to six major challenges.  In the credit union space there are digital solutions for marketing, big data analysis, digital retention options, digital origination solutions, POS lending solutions and the list goes in.  Many of those solutions are CUSO provided and provide economy of scale pricing. A number of these credit unions say they are too busy right now to solve their self-identified major issues because they are committed to X, Y or Z projects – which usually do not solve their major strategic operational challenges.As leaders in the credit union movement we need to dig deep into the past where at the birth of our industry model we reimagined the traditional banking model which disenfranchised many groups – those original members are our core industry champions.  Staying relevant in a rapidly changing digital market is challenging.  We are behind in finding creative ways to say “yes” to young adults with student debt – SOFI has found a way.  We are buried in our required paperwork to quickly approve small business loans – Kabbage has figured it out.  And we have not evolved our cornerstone lending program, the signature loan, to compete not only at the POS for autos, but for personal improvements and major retail purchases as SOFI, Lending Club and so many other FinTechs have.We’re doing fine in status quo mode, but falling behind on looking to the future for inspiration.  We need to invest in the future to be a part of the future…then we will be really doing fine!!last_img read more

Experts warn sellers could be short-changed up to 10pc by selling their home off-market

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:02Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: How to flaunt your Unique Selling Point01:02Brian and Claire Maule, with their daughter Sophia, at the home they are selling in Camp Hill. Image: AAP/Steve Pohlner.INDUSTRY experts have warned of the risks of selling “off-market”, with one leading agent claiming it could leave a homeowner hundreds of thousands of dollars worse off.With continuing low levels of stock for sale and a rise in opportunistic vendors, some agents are reporting an increase in the incidence of “off-market” property transactions.“Off-market” sales are those which occur without public advertising, with real estate agents contacting interested buyers privately.GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HEREPotential purchasers who’ve missed out at auction are registering with sales agents to ask to be notified if anything similar looks likely to come up, while many are also going to buyers’ agents who have databases of those thinking of selling.But some agents have warned sellers risk exchanging for less than their properties could be worth on the open market. Auctioneer Haesley Cush. Image: AAP/Claudia Baxter.Ray White Bulimba principal Roger Carr also gave an example of a vendor who received an off-market offer for their property at 8 Julian Street, Morningside, from a neighbour for $765,000.Fortunately, Mr Carr said the seller decided to reject it and take the home to auction, where it sold for $1.02 million.Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella said off-market sales could work for vendors of unique properties, but they could also be disadvantageous.“If that buyer comes along before you list, then you are often wise to grab that sale fast because you don’t know when another buyer for that unique property will turn up,” Ms Mercorella said.“Eager buyers who have been hunting for a property can put in an offer before it’s listed. In some circumstances this can mean other buyers don’t have an opportunity to put in an offer, and as a result there is no competition for the property and it’s competition that gets the best price for the property.“It’s important for vendors to think carefully before engaging in an off-market sale.“Make sure you understand the marketplace and whether you’re selling yourself — and your property — short.” REIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella. Photo: Claudia Baxter.CoreLogic senior research analyst Cameron Kusher believes there are more benefits associated with taking a property to market than selling in secret.“You’d only want to do that in the case you’re very confident of getting a buyer and your real estate agent has a good database of potential purchasers — and it’s hard to judge that,” Mr Kusher said.“I personally think you’re better off getting the message out to everyone and trying to find a buyer that way.”Brian and Claire Maule are selling their first home at Camp Hill after spending the past six years fully renovating it.The young couple has decided to invest in an advertising campaign, listing the house with Steven Gow of Ray White Bulimba, because they believe it will give them the best chance of getting the highest possible price.“We’re hoping it will bring in a few more buyers, from people who are potentially downgrading from a bigger house or perhaps a young couple looking to start their family,” Mr Maule said.The three-bedroom, one-bathroom property at 14 Clara Street, Camp Hill, is scheduled for auction next month. Industry experts warn sellers could be short-changing themselves by not exposing their property to the open market. Image: AAP/Lukas Coch.Place Estate Agents Kangaroo Point director Simon Caulfield claims vendors selling their houses “off-market” could be missing out on up to 10 per cent of their property’s true value.Mr Caulfield said that by agreeing to sell quickly and quietly without a public campaign, sellers could be significantly short-changing themselves.“My advice always is that clients should expose their property to the market because I think you always risk underselling it if you take it off-market,” Mr Caulfield said.MEET THE NEW OWNER OF PAT RAFTER’S HOUSEHAMPTONS IN BRISBANEBRISBANE BACKYARDS SHRINK 30PC“If you’ve only taken a handful of people through the property, are you really giving it the best chance?“You could end up potentially five to 10 per cent short.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhat the Federal budget mean for you.01:05Mr Caulfield said only about 10 per cent of the transactions his office handled were off-market.“There’s a lot of positivity at the moment in investing money into a campaign and getting a great result,” he said. Selling “off-market” could cost you up to 10 per cent of a home’s value, agents say.Ray White New Farm principal and auctioneer Haesley Cush cautioned that while sellers could save money on advertising costs by selling off-market, a lack of competition meant they might not get the best price for their property.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoMr Cush recently auctioned two similar properties in comparable locations in the inner-city Brisbane suburb of Spring Hill.One vendor decided to spend $3000 solely on digital advertising, while the other spent about $15,000 on a full marketing campaign across print and online.The former generated 16 groups of people during the four week campaign and a sale price just after auction in the early $700,000s, while the latter attracted 50 groups and a sale price in the high $800,000s.“To receive three times the number of inspections in such a small little suburb certainly adds weight to the benefit of a full marketing campaign,” Mr Cush said.“The reality is a strong campaign will likely generate more buyers.“Real estate is a contact sport; the more buyers your agent is in contact with, the more competition your property will likely receive.”last_img read more

Return of Bacolod-Iloilo fast crafts goes smoothly

first_imgPrior to entering the terminal, passengers queue in line as they wait in turn for a temperature check. An isolation room is readily available just in case a passenger registers a high temperature. BACOLOD City – Fast craft vessels plying the Bacolod-Iloilo route set sail for the first time in more than two months after authorities imposed travel restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). PCG personnel then divide the passengers between Bacolod City residents, and those living outside of the city. Once inside the terminal passengers are required to present their identification when purchasing a ticket and go through the normal security checks. Bacolod City residents only need to submit their health cards and after which they are allowed to go on their way. Negros Occidental residents, meanwhile, undergo testing through real time-polymerase reaction at a swab booth set up outside the terminal’s premises. For arriving passengers, Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) personnel immediately retrieve the health cards issued to passengers prior to disembarkation. Seats in the waiting area are clearly marked in order for passengers to follow social distancing measures, after which another round of temperature check will be performed prior to boarding their vessel. Panay News went to the Bacolod Real Estate Development Corp. (Bredco) port over the weekend and observed that passengers have been fully cooperative with port authorities. Ferry operators are also stringent in enforcing minimum health protocols. They only accommodate 50 percent of the vessel’s total seating capacity and are also seen disinfecting the passenger accommodation areas. BY DOMINIQUE GABRIEL BAÑAGA At the roll-on/roll-off terminal, meanwhile, PCG again divides the passengers, only this time Negros Occidental residents are directed to ride a waiting bus which will take them to the Provincial Healing Center in the town of E.B. Magalona for testing./PN Last week, Mayor Evelio Leonardia and Mayor Jerry Treñas agreed to resume travel between the two cities./PNlast_img read more

Munster confirm new deals for Flannery & Jones

first_imgPhoto: © Munsterrugby.ie Team Manager Niall O’Donovan has signed a three-year deal. Munster have confirmed that Jerry Flannery and Felix Jones have both signed two-year contract extensions.Flannery who had been scrum coach is now confirmed as the forwards coach for next season after taking over the role following the death on Anthony Foley last year.Jones has been made Backline and Attack Coach.last_img