Garcia to leave hospital but will miss Watford’s clash with Bournemouth

first_imgWatford boss Oscar Garcia is expected to leave hospital on Friday but is unlikely to be at the Championship game against Bournemouth at Vicarage Road on Saturday.Garcia was admitted to hospital last Sunday with what the club described as ‘minor chest pains’.The Spanish coach was forced to miss the 1-0 win over Blackpool on Tuesday night and has been recovering well in hospital all week.The 41-year-old is now expected to return home and assistant coach Ruben Martinez hopes he will be back with the team in the next few days.Martinez said: “He is much better. I was with him on Thursday and he was very well. He will be with us in a few days. But not yet.“We spoke about his problem and also the players but we didn’t want to disturb him too much with tactics because he trusts me and Javier and he needs his rest.“We hope Oscar will come back with a good mentality and in good spirits to achieve the targets of the club and ourselves.“We have a club target and we hope to wait for Oscar because we know the Championship is long and hard.“We know he is well and all our focus is on the football because we are here to work for the club. Now it is not a big problem because he is well. Our target, our job is to put all the focus on the matches and on training.“Maybe the first day for the players to come here to the training ground and know that Oscar had a problem [was not ideal]. But I think the reaction of the players was very good and I hope they keep this reaction.” 1 Oscar Garcia last_img read more

Blues still eyeing Saints prospect – report

first_imgSouthampton’s Luke Shaw is still on Chelsea’s radar as a possible long-term replacement for Ashley Cole, the Sunday Mirror say.It is claimed Ryan Bertrand will be given more first-team opportunities next season and that Shaw, who recently signed a new contract at St Mary’s, remains of interest.The Sunday People say David Beckham will try to convince Cole and other high-profile English players to finish their career in the United States.And Everton boss David Moyes is again linked with the manager’s job at Chelsea, this time by the Daily Star Sunday.Moyes wants to sign Barnsley defender John Stones for £2m, the People say.Fulham are said to have made an approach for the highly-rated 18-year-old along with Sunderland.Meanwhile, Middlesbrough and Crystal Palace have offered contracts to Kieron Dyer following his release by QPR, according to The Sun on Sunday.It is claimed Boro manager Tony Mowbray, who played alongside Dyer at Ipswich Town, is willing to pay him £10,000 per game and that Palace’s former R’s boss Ian Holloway has also offered a pay-as-you-play deal.This page is regularly updated.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Has Biomimetics Surpassed Biology?

first_imgAn article on Science Daily announced an invention that is “Better Than the Human Eye: Tiny Camera With Adjustable Zoom Could Aid Endoscopic Imaging, Robotics, Night Vision.”  While true that human eyes do not have zoom lenses, how does the comparison hold up?    The invention both imitates and surpasses human vision in some respects: “Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are the first to develop a curvilinear camera, much like the human eye, with the significant feature of a zoom capability, unlike the human eye.”  They even call it an “eyeball camera.”  PhysOrg shows a picture of the device, which “has a 3.5x optical zoom, takes sharp images and is only the size of a nickel.”    Previous research by this team, who had “drawn inspiration from animals,” had shown the optical benefits of curved photodetector arrays (08/07/2008).  This time they have upped the ante by controlling the curvature with hydraulics.  Both the simple lens and the photodetector array can have their curvature adjusted by water pressure, allowing for variable zoom.  “We were inspired by the human eye, but we wanted to go beyond the human eye,” said Yonggang Huang at Northwestern.  “Our goal was to develop something simple that can zoom and capture good images, and we’ve achieved that.”    Does the original paper boast about this being an improvement over the eyeball?  In PNAS,1 Jung et al began by saying, “Mammalian eyes provide the biological inspiration for hemispherical cameras, where Petzval-matched curvature in the photodetector array can dramatically simplify lens design without degrading the field of view, focal area, illumination uniformity, or image quality.”  Camera makers have already gone beyond nature by inventing zoom lenses: “Interestingly, biology and evolution2 do not provide guides for achieving the sort of large-range, adjustable zoom capabilities that are widely available in man-made cameras.”    The authors took note of two cases in biology where animals have a kind of binary zoom: (1) “in avian vision, where shallow pits in the retina lead to images with two fixed levels of zoom (50% high magnification in the center of the center of the field of view),” and (2) “imaging properties occur, but in an irreversible fashion, during metamorphosis in amphibian vision to accommodate transitions from aquatic to terrestrial environments.”  (Recall a related capability in cormorant eyes, 05/24/2004).  The “eyeball camera,” however, unlike animal eyes, would be capable of continuous zoom.    The new invention is admittedly simple.  Its resolution is only 16 x 16 pixels, compared to the human retina’s resolution of 126 megapixels (100 million rods 07/13/2001 and 6-7 million cones).  So as interesting as their device is, there is a huge disparity between what they achieved and what we take for granted with human vision (by almost six orders of magnitude in resolution and probably a similar amount in light-gathering power).  It is, however, an important proof of concept: “Although the fill factor and total pixel count in the reported designs are moderate, there is nothing fundamental about the process that prevents significant improvements,” they concluded.  The concepts they have demonstrated in this prototype “might be useful to explore.”1.  Jung et al, “Dynamically tunable hemispherical electronic eye camera system with adjustable zoom capability,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print January 18, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1015440108.2.  This was the only mention of evolution in the paper.More power to this team and to all inventors inspired by biology.  Even if they succeed in improving on the eye some day, they will have supported intelligent design through and through.  Reverse engineering pays a compliment to the designer of what is being imitated.  In spite of their passing reference to evolution, their work has absolutely nothing to do with Darwin – you know, the old storyteller who got cold shudders thinking of the design of the human eye – and that was without knowing about its ideal optics (05/09/2002), waveguides (05/07/2010), clean-up crews (08/28/2003), image processing (05/22/2003), and much, much more.  “Biology and evolution do not provide guides,” they said.  Of course not; evolution is unguided.  It would be the blind leading the blind, so ditch the thought.    Human ingenuity can and does exceed biology all the time.  No animals explore space, or resolve distant quasars, or image the molecular motors in their own cells with X-ray diffraction.  God gave humans the minds and hands to expand their biological capabilities.  If scientists can invent eyeball-mimic cameras with zoom lenses, all for the good.  If they can get them to take high-def 3-D video at 126 megapixel resolution, repair themselves, reproduce themselves and run on potatoes, then we might consider them starting to come a little closer to a few of the engineering specs of the One who made “the seeing eye” (Proverbs 20:12).  Even such devices, though, would be useless without an even more complex brain to interpret them and to understand what it is they are seeing.  Let’s not be numbered among those who, having eyes, do not see (Mark 8:18).(Visited 29 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

This Week in Microsoft News: New Clues In the Novell Patent Mystery and More

first_imgThese thee Microsoft stories weren’t the biggest news of the week, but they are worth knowing about if you missed them. One of the stories is merely a clue into an ongoing mystery surrounding Microsoft’s acquisition of some patents from Novell that have analysts speculating and open source advocates worrying. Each story sheds a little light on Microsoft’s strategy and where the company is headed. For example, the release of Forefront Endpoint Protection 2010 indicates how Microsoft is consolidating various enterprise management tools into a single interface.Forefront Endpoint Protection 2010 ReleasedMicrosoft released a commercial version its Forefront Endpoint Protection software this week. It’s now available from Microsoft Volume Licensing Service Center. IT managers can now deploy, configure, manage, update, and report on FEP protections using System Center Configuration Manager 2007.The significance of this is that Microsoft is now firmly in the software security business as the space converges. Earlier this year, Intel purchased McAfee in an attempt to bring security software closer to hardware.Microsoft Wasn’t Alone In Purchasing Those 882 Novell PatentsFlorian Muller discovered the companies behind CPTN Holdings, the members of mysterious organization that purchased 882 patents from Novell when Attachmate bought Novell last month. It turns out that CPTN consists of Microsoft, Apple, EMC, and Oracle.What patents these companies bought remains a mystery.Rumor: Oracle and Microsoft in Bidding War for AutonomyBritish tabloid Daily Mail “reported” that Oracle and Microsoft are in a bidding war for enterprise analytics company Autonomy. We suggest taking this rumor with a grain of salt. But if true, this could be interesting as Arik Hesseldahl writes for All Things Digital:On its face this rumor is interesting because now that the battle to roll up the data storage firms is largely resolved following Dell’s acquisition of Compellent, one of the next dealmaking battle fronts for the large IT vendors is going to be software that makes managing data in all its various forms easier, more powerful and less costly.This could signal more consolidation in the business analytics field, something we talked about when IBM purchased Netezza last fall. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Tags:#enterprise#news klint finleycenter_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affairlast_img read more