Orange Completes Acquisition of Cellcom

first_imgOrange announced last Thursday that it has completed the acquisition of 100 percent of Cellcom, one of Liberia’s leading mobile operators, through its subsidiary Orange Côte d’Ivoire. Less than three months after signing the agreement with Cellcom Telecommunications Limited for the acquisition of its Liberian subsidiary, Orange has obtained all the official approbations necessary to complete the transaction. Cellcom Liberia has 1.4 million customers, a release said.Liberia will now become the 20th country in Africa and the Middle East to join the Orange group. With a population of 4.3 million people and relatively low mobile penetration rate (66 percent of the population), the country has a high-growth potential for Orange.According to the release, over the next few months, Liberian customers will benefit from the arrival of Orange, one of Africa’s leading players in the telecoms’ industry. Orange will provide its marketing expertise and world-class technical capability to further strengthen the operator’s established network and enhance customer service.This acquisition is part of the international development strategy of Orange, which aims to accelerate growth by entering new emerging markets with high potential. This will enable Orange to strengthen its positions in Africa, where almost one in ten people are already customers.Orange is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 39 billion euros in 2014 and 157,000 employees worldwide at 30 September 2015, including 98,000 employees in France.Present in 29 countries, including Liberia, the Group has a total customer base of 263 million customers worldwide at 30 September 2015, including 200 million mobile customers and 18 million fixed broadband customers. Orange is also a leading provider of global IT and telecommunication services to multi-national companies, under the brand Orange Business Services. Orange subsidiary Sonatel has announced plans to open a joint network operations center in Dakar, Senegal, on 1 February 2016, from which to manage its networks in Senegal, Mali, Guinea and Guinea Bissau. The project will include Orange’s subsidiaries in Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Cote d’Ivoire, Niger and the Democratic Republic of Congo; all core network and platform services for all Orange affiliates in sub-Saharan Africa. The facility will be opened on a build, operate, transfer basis by a third party and once built will be partly transferred to Orange Cote d’Ivoire. Huawei is providing the infrastructures for two sites in Dakar and Abidjan, with the headquarters to be in Dakar. Sonatel said the joint network operation centre is part of its AMEA Network Optimization transformation project. Sonatel said it was too soon to discuss who will be its outsourcer. Listed on Euronext Paris (symbol ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol ORAN), Orange first announced the African network monitoring plan in July.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

NFL draft: Raiders should stand pat at Nos. 1, 24, 27

first_imgALAMEDA — It was getting toward the end of a nearly hour-long interview session at the NFL owners meeting in Arizona when Raiders coach Jon Gruden covered all the bases.“It depends when you’re on the clock and you’re sitting there at No. 4 and someone offers you to move back to whenever, what are they giving you?,” Gruden said. “We’re wide open to moving up. We are wide open to moving back. We are wide open to just sitting there and taking a guy who falls to us.”And the winner is . . . …last_img

Veteran lensman Kumalo dies

first_imgThe legendary Alf Kumalo captured over six decades of South African history.(Image: Mzansi Magic) Jabu Pereira, the curator of the Alf Kumalo Museum, standing next to a picture of a young Kumalo. Sibusiso Kumalo, his eldest daughter, said that she is pleased that she was able to forge a great relationship with her father towards the end of his life.(Images: Ray Maota)MEDIA CONTACTS• Jabu PereiraAlf Kumalo Museum and School ofPhotography+27 11 985 5958RELATED ARTICLES• Nikon to nurture young photographers• Photos to promote social dialogue• SA student is world photo finalist• The boy who sees in picturesRay MaotaLess than a week before the passing of one of South Africa’s longest serving photojournalists, Alf Kumalo, MediaclubSouthAfrica.com spoke to his eldest daughter Sibusiso, and the curator of the photography museum he founded.Kumalo died at age 82 at the Charlotte Maxeke hospital in Johannesburg on Sunday 21 October, after struggling with prostate cancer. He enjoyed a long and eventful career spanning over six decades, eloquently capturing South Africa’s progression from apartheid state to a democracy.Sibusiso referred to her father as a people’s person who would always tell stories – generally funny ones – about his work.“I remember him telling me how he was not allowed to take pictures during the Soweto riots of the 1980s,” she recalled, “and he learned to balance the camera on his head so, using a self-timer, he could shoot without using his hands.”Sibusiso was born in 1969 but only lived with her father for nine years until 1978 when her parents divorced.She expressed her gratitude for the time the two of them spent healing old wounds. “I am glad to have had a relationship with him where we ironed out old issues before he was on his death bed.”Tributes pour inPresident Jacob Zuma said in a statement that South Africa had lost an outstanding individual.“He was a meticulous photographer and his work will live on forever as a monument to the people’s resilience and fortitude in the face of colonial oppression and apartheid,” he said.In a tribute issued by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory on Monday morning, spokesperson Sello Hatang reflected on Kumalo’s career, which began in earnest in 1951 and mirrored the rise of Mandela’s own political career.“He was one of South Africa’s most eminent photographers and one who closely documented the life of Nelson Mandela both before and after his imprisonment”, Hatang said.“Bra Alf photographed many of the historic events in which Mandela played a key role, including the Treason and Rivonia trials.”From the time Mandela was sentenced in 1962 to five years in jail and then to life in 1964, he added, Kumalo continued to photograph the struggle against apartheid and, importantly, to visually record the life of Mandela’s family.Former ambassador to the UN Dumisani Kumalo, a cousin of the late photographer, told The Times newspaper that he had not been well for a while.“We lost a hero. We lost a great man and a brother and a pillar in our family,” said Kumalo.Six decades of photographyKumalo is credited with some of the country’s most captivating photography that captured numerous historic events from as early on as the 1950s.It was after he freelanced for Bantu World newspaper – which later became known as The World – and worked for Golden City Post that he began to rise to prominence, and especially during his tenure at Drum magazine in the 1960s.Kumalo entered and won his first photographic competition in 1963, and the announcement reached him while he was in London covering a Mohammad Ali fight.He had entered under his African names Mangaliso Dukuza, because he wanted the judging to be impartial and not influenced by his already-flourishing reputation.Other momentous events captured by Kumalo include the infamous student uprising of 1976, the release of Mandela from prison in 1990, negotiations at the Convention for a Democratic South Africa – often referred to in local media as the ‘Codesa talks’ – and the former president’s inauguration as South Africa’s first black head of state in 1994.A solo exhibition of his life’s work took place at the 59th session of the UN General Assembly in September 2004.In the same year Kumalo received the Order of Ikhamanga in silver for his contribution to documentary photography and journalism in the country. The award is presented by the president in recognition of South Africans who have excelled in the fields of arts, culture, literature, music, journalism or sport.His work has appeared on international publications including Britain’s Observer, the New York Times and the New York Post and Ireland’s Sunday Independent.Passing on his skillsIn 2002 Kumalo opened the doors to a school of photography, which he operated from what used to be his house in Diepkloof, for the benefit of previously disadvantaged youngsters who aspire to follow in his footsteps. There is also a museum with his works on the premises, where Jabu Perreira works as a full-time curator.“Personally I think his portraits are the best,” he told our journalist. “The good thing about Alf’s work during the apartheid era is that his talent came from inside and his subjects felt relaxed with him behind the lens.”Because of a lack of funds, the school has not been able to enrol new students for several years. It was initially funded by a grant from Movimondo, an Italian NGO involved in the field of photography.“Bra Alf would be invited to events as a VIP, but he would end up taking photos and engaging with the masses instead,” said Perreira.Kumalo’s vision for the museum, which is currently being renovated, was to create an artistic space for people who are in the arts.“We want to host film screenings, exhibitions and seminars on photography to attract an audience to the museum,” said Perreira.last_img read more

State of Nation address to cost R2m less

first_img12 February 2014This year’s State of the Nation address will cost R2-million less than it did last year, Parliament’s presiding officers announced on Tuesday.The event, during which President Jacob Zuma is expected to outline the progress made by his administration over the past five years and indicated the government’s service delivery plans for the coming year, will take place in Parliament in Cape Town on Thursday.Briefing journalists on Tuesday, Parliament’s presiding officers said they were ready to host Zuma and all invited guests on Thursday.Baby Tyawa, the acting secretary of Parliament, said that while this year’s event would be bigger in that the two houses of Parliament had separate programmes for commemorating 20 years of democracy, the budget for all the activities around the State of Nation address including a post-address presidential banquet – stood at R5.7-million.She said this year’s banquet would be held at the Cape Town Convention Centre, meaning millions or rands will be saved compared to last year, when they had erected a marquee tent and bussed all the guests to the venue.Tyawa said they had noted Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s call for the administration to cut expenditure and curb abuse of taxpayer’s funds.20 years of a democratic ParliamentMeanwhile, Mninwa Mahlangu, the chairperson of the National Council of Provinces (NCOP), said that Parliament would use Thursday’s State of the Nation address to see how it could enhance its oversight programme and how to best involve members of the public in the coming year.When President Zuma steps up to deliver his last State of the Nation address of the current administration, the two houses of Parliament – the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) and the National Assembly (NA) – will also reflect on how they have fared in a democratic South Africa over the past 20 years.Mahlangu said this year’s State of the Nation address would also be a bittersweet event, as it will be the first that former president Nelson Mandela, who passed away in December, is not around to witness.Mahlangu added that since 2014 was also an election year, a second State of the Nation address would take place after the new President has been inaugurated.Thursday’s address will be broadcast live in all official languages on TV and radio stations from 7pm.There will be a Parliamentary debate on the address on 18 and 19 February, followed by Zuma’s reply to the debate on 20 February.The debate will be streamed live on Parliament’s website and its YouTube channel, and broadcast on the Parliamentary DSTV TV channel.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Back To School: Tech For High School

first_imgIn general, if you have have a family desktop PC, a tablet can supplement that well. In fact, iPads seem to be all the rage in secondary schools these days. That may make Apple’s tablet look like the obvious choice, and if there’s a hardware mandate, then it clearly is. But if cost matters, consider an Android tablet. Options like the stylus-enabled Samsung Galaxy Note 8 and Google’s Nexus 7 have lower price tags, deliver excellent screen resolution and offer plenty of educational apps. For eBooks and streaming or Web browsing, an Amazon Kindle Fire HD is a bargain option. If your student lacks a full-fledged computer, a laptop is the savvy choice for the portability. For seniors, invest in an ultrabook like a Macbook Air or Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13. Although they’re more expensive, these are lightweight devices that he or she can take to college—and schlep between dorms and numerous far-flung university classes—next year. Juniors and younger students, for whom the load may not matter as much, less expensive offerings like the Dell Latitude 3330 will work well. This model features a fine-tuned touchpad and curved keyboard, but goes for roughly half the price of an advanced ultrabook. As for smartphones, they may seem like a social tool more than a study aid, but consider this: A high schooler’s academic success can also hinge on peer communication. Not only can they look up important class info or research at will, but smartphones also help them stay organized on the fly and connect easily with tutors, research buddies and study groups. Some kids may need parental guidance or oversight, but this could be an educational opportunity. After all, learning how to manage technology use during these formative years could be an important life lesson.At this point, Android and iOS—the two dominant platforms—have both developed into mature eco-systems with robust app stores. So the handset or even platform choice may not matter as much as the calling, texting or data plans that go with them. The best option: For heavy texters or data users, you’ll want unlimited plans. Or, for an affordable option, consider a phone on a prepaid plan. Your teen could even take partial or full responsibility for funding it. Smart Apps For Smart StudentsWhen it comes to hardware, there are plenty of deals this time of year. To go along with them, there are plenty of apps that can help that student graduate to academic rock star. Flash Cards: Flashcards by Brainscape (iOS) and AnkiDroid Flashcards (Android) let students easily quiz themselves on a variety of topic and course material. Calculator: PocketCAS Lite (iOS) and Graphing Calculator (Android) offer calculator for advanced mathematics classes. Homework Planner: Studious (iOS and Android) organizes big exams, homework and project deadlines. The app offers alerts for events, and when classes are in session, even silences the phone.Study guide: Some kids may use SparkNotes (iOS and Android) summaries so they can skip reading assignments, but they also provide very handy study guides for class material. The developer also offers SparkNotes Test Prep for SAT and ACT.Biology: Frog dissection is a quintessential experience for high school biology classes. With the Froguts app (iOS and Android) virtual frog dissection, students can benefit from interactive 3-D anatomical simulations, audio and text cues that boost comprehension.Although schools with splashy tech-forward programs get headlines these days, the truth is, plenty of high schools still depend on traditional textbook education. But even in these environments, consumer technology offers teenagers an advantage, one that extends beyond academics.Call it a glimpse of the future, but society will only become more connected as time goes on. Familiarizing today’s students with the technologies they might advance in the future can help prepare them for the real world. And, in turn, it gives the world its best chance at welcoming its future visionaries. Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock. Table image courtesy Allison Hare cc. adriana lee This is a post in Back To School, an ongoing series where ReadWrite covers technology trends in education for parents and educators.Never before have teens been so tech-driven, and educators desperate to connect with them have noticed. What’s more, they’re responding. Creative learning formats and tablet-based curricula have been picking up steam in high schools across the country.The challenge for parents, particularly those who have struggled to balance the kids’ tech usage at home, is equipping them with the right tools for school. So now, as the fall semester gets underway, let’s take a look at what high school students need to succeed in this changing educational landscape.High Schools Are Growing UpLast month, the Federal Communications Commission voted to make changes to a funding program, granting $2.3 billion so schools and libraries can update telecommunications and equipment. It will take time before that takes shape, but it’s a sign that yesterday’s schools are gearing up for today’s technologies. In fact, the whole notion of “classroom” is undergoing a metamorphosis. One educational tech trend taking hold is the flipped classroom, where pupils stream multimedia lectures at home and do what used to be “homework” in school among tutors and peers.One of the most well-known programs comes from the Google-backed Khan Academy, a non-profit educational site that offers online learning via streaming videos. The academy, which started with a pilot project in Los Altos, Calif., now extends to more than 30,000 classrooms all over the globe. Another major movement revolves around iPads. Tablet-based learning may not be ubiquitous yet, but they have been attracting attention among an increasing number of teachers and administrators, and last year, tablets trumped laptops among high school students. Meanwhile, in places like Las Vegas’ Clark County and other school districts, BYOD (“bring your own device”) strategies gain popularity. Of course, not all schools have tech initiatives, but for those that do, mere backpacks, notebooks and pencils won’t cut it. And even for those that don’t, there are still some key tools that can give teens a leg up in class. The Lowdown On Tech for High SchoolClasses, schools and school districts vary. Some schools focus on laptops, while others require tablets. It’s important to find out if there are any hardware requirements before making any purchasing decisions.  A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Back To School#education#laptops#mobile#tablet Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more