Hoboken: What do you REALLY need to know about the six…

first_imgMembers of the Anthony Romano campaign walk up Washington Street in #Hoboken on Thursday evening. ×Members of the Anthony Romano campaign walk up Washington Street in #Hoboken on Thursday evening. HOBOKEN — Are you having trouble distinguishing among the six people running for mayor in the November election? What aren’t they telling you in their glossy campaign literature?Now that the candidates officially filed to run earlier this month, we’ve got a complete rundown of their stances and some of their past actions — the good, the controversial, and more.Why are some of the candidates only criticizing Mayor Dawn Zimmer now, when they were in office for several years and never have before? What are their proudest accomplishments? What have they dealt with legally in the past? What should they do more of?Pick up the new edition on your stoop over the weekend or come back here on Sunday.last_img

Todd Rokita defeats Weinzapfel for Indiana Attorney General position

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Previous articleDistrict 2 Congresswoman Jackie Walorski declares victoryNext articleIncumbents and Republicans sweep local Elkhart County races Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Todd Rokita defeats Weinzapfel for Indiana Attorney General position Facebook By US House of Reps ([1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons Republican Todd Rokita has defeated his Democratic challenger, Jonathan Weinzapfel to win the Indiana Attorney General job.Rokita is a former Congressman and Secretary of State who was the last candidate to enter the race for the nomination. Rokita grew up in Munster. He holds a B.A. degree from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, where he was an Eli Lilly Fellow.He has a law degree from Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis. He was also the most vocal critic during the process of Hill, who was accused of groping four women in 2018.Rokita defeated Republican incumbent Curtis Hill in the state primary. Back in May, Hill was suspended from practicing law for one month for the groping incident.On election day, Rokita revealed that he had tested positive for COVID-19 and would watch election results from his home. Pinterest By Jon Zimney – November 3, 2020 0 179 Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Twitterlast_img read more

Why do rich countries have so many poor children?

first_imgMercatorNet 18 September 2014New Zealanders elect a new government on Saturday after a campaign in which several parties and advocacy groups have vied with each other to push child poverty to the top of the political agenda. That this should be the case might surprise the rest of the world.Ours is a small, prosperous country of 4.5 million people, a welfare state (albeit one made over to some extent by market forces) and an agricultural producer which sells food to the world. Yet enough children arrive at school without breakfast or lunch to warrant food programmes in schools serving the poorest areas. According to a benchmark 2012 report, many children come from homes that are cold, poorly furnished and often crowded, they lack raincoats and sturdy shoes for wet weather and largely miss out on fresh fruit and vegetables, which grow here the year round.At last count around 280,000 children lived in households below a poverty line of 60 percent of median income adjusted for family size (an unofficial measure since we have no official one). That’s one in four children under the age of 18, with a higher rate for those under 11.Compared with those in average and higher income homes, these children are three times as likely to get sick, and 5.6 times as likely to be hospitalised for injuries from assault, neglect or maltreatment. They are less likely to leave school with the minimum qualification for skilled employment, and are therefore more likely to remain poor and perpetuate the poverty cycle.But we are not alone. Nor are we the worst among the rich countries for neglecting the most vulnerable members of society. Unicef’s Innocenti Report Card 2012: Measuring child poverty, gives New Zealand a mid-ranking child poverty rate along with Australia and the UK (all between 11 and 12 percent) and leaves the US at the bottom (23 percent), better only than Romania. These rates reflect 2009-2010 data, a 50 percent income poverty line, and a child deprivation index which includes items such as outdoor leisure equipment and an internet connection.Keeping poverty at bay comes at a cost, of course. The rates for the UK, New Zealand and Australia, middling as they are, reflect some of the highest social spending in the world: about 3.6 percent of GDP for the UK, and 3.1 percent for New Zealand and 2.8 for Australia – compared with around 1.3 percent for the US.There is much that is debatable about poverty measures, starting with the fact that in rich countries, at least, the poverty line is relative and a moving target. But, lines and statistics aside, if increasing numbers of children are turning up at school hungry and ill-clothed, and at hospital emergency departments with infectious diseases or signs of abuse, there is clearly a problem to address.The question is: What sort of problem? Inequality – the increasing gap between the rich and the poor? Global capitalism? Miserly right-wing governments? Irresponsible parents producing children they can’t support (a favourite gripe of newspaper correspondents)? Welfare dependency and loss of the work ethic?What about the most fundamental thing that the majority of those children lack – a stable, married mum and dad? In 2012 48 percent of births in New Zealand were to unmarried mothers, and it is no secret that the majority of the poorest children are being raised by single parents. This is one of the top risk factors for child poverty in all countries, although it seldom receives more than a mention in advocacy literature or political debates. Social science, however, increasingly confirms that the decline of marriage is a key, if not the key, to child poverty and inequality.http://www.mercatornet.com/articles/view/why_do_rich_countries_have_so_many_poor_childrenlast_img read more

‘Field of Dreams’…Surging Pirates slip by Cardinals 5-4 for 4th straight win

first_imgStarling Marte (6) scores from third on a sacrifice fly by Andrew McCutchen in the fifth inning of a baseball game as St. Louis Cardinals catcher Tony Cruz (48) waits for the late relay throw, in Pittsburgh on Wednesday, July 31, 2013. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)PITTSBURGH (AP) – Pittsburgh Pirates general manager Neal Huntington spent the hours leading up to the non-waiver trade deadline searching for a way to upgrade the team with the best record in baseball.The typically buttoned down Huntington even considered taking leave of his senses to do it.“We talk a lot about, we don’t want to do something stupid,” Huntington said Wednesday after the deadline passed. “We were willing to do something stupid. We just didn’t want to do anything insane.”At the moment, insanity might be defined as breaking up the chemistry the Pirates have spent the last four months cultivating.Russell Martin drove home Neil Walker with the go-ahead run in the eighth inning and the Pirates rallied past the St. Louis Cardinals 5-4 to extend their lead in the NL Central to 2½ games.Pittsburgh (65-42) has its best record entering August since the 1972 Pirates ended July at 60-35.Martin’s sharp grounder off Trevor Rosenthal (1-2) rolled into left field, giving Walker time to score from second and propel Pittsburgh to its 25th comeback win in an increasingly special season. Pittsburgh is 23 games over .500 for the first time since 1992.“We can win just about every way possible,” manager Clint Hurdle said.The Cardinals appeared in firm control of the division race two weeks ago but now find themselves staring up at the Pirates, who have taken the first four games of a five-game series.St. Louis broke out of a slump to put together 13 hits, but the Cardinals left 11 runners on base and dropped their seventh straight. The Cardinals led 2-0, 3-1 and 4-2 but couldn’t hold on.“You always at some point during the season, every year, no matter what, go through a rough patch,” St. Louis starter Adam Wainwright said after failing to earn his 14th victory. “The good teams find a way to get out of that rough patch and find a way to get back to playing good quality baseball, and that’s what we’re going to do.”Tony Watson (3-1) worked two shutout innings in relief of starter Jeff Locke. Mark Melancon pitched a perfect ninth for his fifth save. Melancon is 3 for 3 in save opportunities since All-Star closer Jason Grilli went down with a right forearm injury last week.Matt Holliday had three hits and drove in two runs but St. Louis failed to score over the final five innings against Pittsburgh’s bullpen.“There’s something we’re not doing, and we know we’re not doing it and fixing it,” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said.Walker hit his seventh homer of the season off Wainwright in the first inning, starting a pattern that repeated itself throughout the night. The Cardinals found ways to score off starter Jeff Locke, but Pittsburgh kept chipping away.“It’s things we’ve done throughout the course of the season,” Pittsburgh center fielder Andrew McCutchen said. “If we’re down early, we just keep working.”The teams with the two best records in the National League were mostly spectators before Wednesday’s non-waiver trade deadline, though the Pirates acquired minor leaguer Robert Andino from Seattle.The past two seasons, the Pirates made somewhat aggressive moves meant to bolster their playoff chances, but instead contributed in part to a second-half swoon.This time, Huntington is keeping the group he called “one of the tightest” he’s been around intact. When the 4 p.m. deadline passed, the Pirates were huddled around a TV in the clubhouse. They weren’t anxiously waiting for news. Instead, they were watching Martin and first baseman Garrett Jones play video games.“The trade deadline is like a gossip magazine,” Watson said. “You take it for what it’s worth but it’s in one ear and out the other.”Pittsburgh needed to find a way after a rare off-night by Locke, whose rapid ascension from fifth starter to All-Star has fueled Pittsburgh’s relentless pursuit of the Cardinals. But St. Louis spent four innings pecking away at the left-hander’s usually deft mix of breaking balls.The Cardinals came in hitting just .155 (30-194) during their late-July swoon but peppered Locke for 10 hits, the most he has given up in 31 career starts.They came in various ways, from a hard-hit double by Beltran in the fourth to a swinging bunt by David Descalso that traveled 20 feet. Locke tied a season high by giving up four runs. He struck out six and walked one as his ERA rose from 2.15 to 2.36.“He was fighting uphill all night,” Hurdle said.Wainwright, however, couldn’t take advantage of the first signs of life by the St. Louis offense in a week. Every time the Cardinals would push in front, the Pirates would respond, eventually tying it on a sacrifice fly by McCutchen in the fifth. Wainwright left after seven innings, allowing four runs on eight hits, striking out six and walking one.“(They) gave me the lead three times and I blew the save three times,” Wainwright said. “I can be better than that, I will be better than that.”NOTES: The Pirates placed reserve C Mike McKenry on the 15-day disabled after he underwent surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn meniscus in his left knee. Rookie Tony Sanchez, Pittsburgh’s top pick in the 2009 draft, will serve as the primary backup to Martin for the rest of the season … The series concludes Thursday with Pittsburgh’s Charlie Morton (3-2, 3.59 ERA) facing Joe Kelly (1-3 3.44). The Pirates are 5-1 in Morton’s last six starts.last_img read more