It was tough, physically: Dravid on his ton

first_imgDrained after hitting another one of his typically resolute hundreds, veteran Indian batsman Rahul Dravid said it was tough adjusting to the conditions in the ongoing first cricket Test against the West Indies here.Dravid, for whom the 112-run knock on the third day of the match on Wednesday was his 32nd Test century, confessed he found the effort physically very demanding at the Sabina Park.”It was tough physically. I came here just three days ago. The jet lag, getting up early morning, having not played a Test for a long time and playing in these hot conditions has been very tiring,” remarked Dravid, who batted for over 400 minutes for his 112 runs and hit 10 fours and a six from the 274 balls he faced.”You could do as much physical workout; do the bike and gym and run laps of ground but the sheer effort of batting and fielding and staying on the field and then immediately come to bat, needs practice.”I sweat a lot so physically it’s always been a contest for me. That’s why I have to work harder on my fitness for I know the way I bat, I have to stay in for long periods.””But it was a big Test match and I was fired up…I felt as if I was in my space. Hopefully, we can win the Test and get a day’s rest.”Dravid’s example was lost on young batsmen, such as Virat Kohli and Suresh Raina, who are seen as India’s next generation of Test batsmen.advertisement”I try telling them (the youngsters) to weather the storm; go through the intensity of a spell which might last 8-10-12 overs.” .You fight your way and then it becomes easy. It’s easy to get caught up when things around you are buzzing with noise; balls are flying and spinners are getting big help. You then start thinking it’s hard. But if you last it out, it becomes easier,” Dravid said.”Today in the morning, Ravi Rampaul kept it tight. I knew I had to go through that spell. You need to back yourself; need to enjoy the contest. It’s going to get easier and then you must be there to capitalise on it,” said Dravid, allowing a rare peek in his batting methodology.”I remember in Johannesburg (in 1997), Donald and Pollock were bowling a great spell and I thought it was really tough and I would never be able to play. You need to get through it, fight your way, grit your teeth. Suddenly, it gets easier.”Dravid managed to make 148 runs in that Test which happened to be his first century in his ninth match.Dravid claimed the intensity of the contest at Sabina Park, ironically, helped him get into his space.”I love the contest. When you are back to the wall, it improves your concentration, your focus. It helped me focus my mind, get it in the right place and I felt in control.”For long periods of time, I didn’t score many runs but considering the wicket it probably was the right thing. “Interestingly, Dravid didn’t find it a demand that he rarely received support from his teammates at the other end.”It doesn’t make a difference to me, what’s happening at the other end. My job is to focus. But when you lose wickets, it’s the opposition who picks up. When a new batsman comes in, you know the rivals have got their game together and there would be another 12-14 overs of intensity.” .Dravid also explained the reason of his refusal to take singles when Amit Mishra came in to bat.”I was refusing singles of the first two balls. Sometimes it relaxes bowlers and I was hoping it would give me a four-scoring opportunity.”The stand with Mishra turned out to be a critical one as 56 runs came for the ninth wicket and not only Dravid could get to his century but also the lead stretched beyond 300 runs.Dravid termed it a good cricketing pitch, though slightly in favour of bowlers.”It’s a good cricket wicket. It’s slightly in favour of bowlers and that’s how it should be. The spinners are getting turn; pacers are getting bounce. If you bowl in right areas, it’s difficult for batsmen. If you bowl badly, because of the bounce, the batters can capitalise.”The veteran middle-order batsman though felt his team held the advantage in this Test.”If we get early wickets, we can run through. But we know Shivnarine Chanderpaul is a dangerous player. They have got some good young players. From our perspective, if we bowl in the right areas, we will create opportunity.advertisement”We need to be patient and make batsmen play all the time.”Dravid singled out Ishant Sharma and Praveen Kumar for their bowling effort in this Test so far.”Ishant has been very impressive. Today his bowling was terrific. Praveen is a very skillful, crafty, clever bowler.”- With inputs from PTIFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

PSG Didn’t Deserve Success or Luck vs Dijon, Says Coach Thomas Tuchel After Shock Loss

first_imgParis: Paris Saint-Germain suffered a shock 2-1 defeat at the hands of rock-bottom Dijon on Friday with coach Thomas Tuchel accusing his expensively-assembled team of “being too passive and not playing together”.It was the third loss of the Ligue 1 season for the French champions who could also see their lead at the top trimmed to just five points by the end of the weekend. Dijon, who started the day at the foot of the table with just nine points, fell behind to Kylian Mbappe’s fifth goal in seven games.However, Mounir Chouiar levelled in the sixth minute of stoppage time in the first half before Venezuelan international Jhonder Cadiz hit the winner in the 47th minute.”We were too passive in the first half, not only in defence but also in attack because we did not play together,” said Tuchel.”We lacked precision and rhythm. It was much better in the second half because we had three shots before half-time and 17 after the break. Maybe we didn’t deserve to have success or luck with us today.”PSG were without the injured Neymar but looked more than capable of blowing away a Dijon team who had managed to score just six goals in 11 games before Friday’s match which was played out in torrential rain.Dijon had previously never defeated PSG in the top flight in 2011, conceding 31 goals in eight meetings.Mbappe gave PSG the lead in the 19th minute after a terrible mix-up in the Dijon defence allowed Angel Di Maria to steal possession and feed Mbappe.The French World Cup winner finished with a delightful chip over Alfred Gomis in the Dijon goal.After the match was held up due to a nasty blow suffered by Fouad Chafik who collided with Gomis, Dijon were on level terms.Didier Ndong crossed from the right with PSG keeper Keylor Navas clearing the ball only as far as Chouiar who hit the target.Two minutes into the second period, Cadiz shrugged off the attentions of Marquinhos and Idrissa Gueye before tucking away a left foot shot between the legs of Navas.”We hate to lose,” added Tuchel. “It could have been possible to win given the number of chances we created. We always say that we are in another league. We must accept defeat and improve but I retain confidence in my players.”The three points lifted Dijon into third from bottom in the Ligue 1 table while PSG will now need to regroup before facing Club Brugge in the Champions League at home on Wednesday. Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. dijonfootballKylian MbappeLigue 1 First Published: November 3, 2019, 7:30 AM ISTlast_img read more

Gates, Dell, and Jobs: Reading Between The Lines Reveals Insights

first_imgThis Jobs – “phone” 2.  The most used word by each of the speakers was also fascinating:  The point the writer of the article was trying to make was that Jobs was much easier to understand by mere mortals.  I was personally surprised to see the variance in the number of words per sentence — I thought they would have been bunched closer together. Dell – 16.5 words per sentence Gates – “devices” — Brian Halligan. Originally published Feb 1, 2007 4:37:00 PM, updated March 21 2013  is a fascinating comparison of the words used by Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Michael Dell on recent keynote style speeches.  There are a bunch of interesting things that jumped out at me about this data: article Jobs – 10.5 words per sentence.  Dell – “gaming” 1.  The average number of words used per sentence was incredibly interesting.  3.  The word “cool” is one of the most common utterances out of all three of these middle aged tech industry leaders’ mouths.  I always thought as I got older that I should use the word “cool” less and less, but I guess the word “cool” has become a permanent part of our lexicon. If ten years ago someone told me that the most uttered word out of Bill Gates mouth was going to be “devices,” I would have laughed them out of the room.  Same goes for “phone” for Jobs and “gaming” for Dell.  It’s amazing how these companies have shifted their positioning over the years.  It will be interesting to see which ones pull off these shifts in positioning over the next couple of years. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Gates – 21.5 words per sentencelast_img read more

Finally! Google Updates PageRank: Here’s The Real Scoop From 139,000 Websites

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 25, 2007 11:54:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Google Updates If you’re involved in Internet Marketing, chances are, you have read the news about the recent updates Google has made to it’s Toolbar PageRank number (this is the publicly available PageRank number). Much of the current discussion has been the loss of PageRank by some high-profile sites in articles like “Digg Favorites Slapped by Google” and “Google changing the PageRank Algorithm?”  There has also been a fair amount of speculation as to the cause of this PageRank loss for these popular (and in many cases, highly regarded) websites.(For those of you who don’t know what Google PageRank is, check out The Importance of Google PageRank.)The most common speculation is that these sites lost PageRank because they were selling links, and that this is a “penalty” being imposed by Google rather than just a “normal” update of PageRank. I don’t have a strong opinion (yet) as to whether this was indeed the cause, but I do have some facts related to this recent news. As it turns out, we have access to the Google PageRank data for over 139,000 websites.  This data was collected via our free SEO tool called Website Grader.  Website Grader looks at a number of factors about a website as part of its evaluation — including Google PageRank.So, here are some of the insights drawn from this database. Disclaimer: The following was derived from some quick database queries and should be used for amusement purposes only. I’m not going to try and defend the points below. You don’t have to believe me.  Also, I’d suggest using some of the numbers shown as relative measures indicating trends — not absolute numbers you’d hang your hat on.What You Can Learn About PageRank From 139,000 Websites1) Contrary to what some believe, this recent update did not just reduce PageRank for some number of websites. There were sites that have increased in PageRank as a result of the recent update. A quick scan showed at least a handful of sites with PR5 or higher than rose to PR6 or higher. (As you would expect, there were also improvements in PageRank for a lot of lower ranked sites as well).2) Overall, the average PageRank (across all sites) seems to bounce around a little. If we ignore sites with PageRank 0, the average PageRank for the home page of websites submitted to Website Grader was around 4.59 in March 2007. This increased to about 4.77 in April 2007. Coincidentally, there was a Google PageRank update in that month. I always suspected that the April update was reasonably “liberal” in its allocation of PageRank, now the data seems to back it up. Note: Technically, PageRank is assigned to individual URLs (not websites). What we tracking is the PageRank of the home/default page of a website as that is what most people talk about as a measure of the overall weight of their website with search engines.3) Currently, the average PageRank is about 4.22 in October 2007  (it was 4.16 in September 2007). So, it would seem to me that there has been a drift downward in PageRank overall since the peak back in April.Dharmesh Shah contributed heavily to this article.  In fact, he might have even posted it himself if he were not locked in the basement writing code for HubSpot right now.  (To any law enforcement officials reading this, don’t worry, he is not being held captive against his will.  He has a big smile on his face and is working on “really cool stuff”.) Topics:last_img read more

My Dinner With Google & Madison Avenue

first_img What do you think:  (a) Is Madison Avenue going to grow over the next few years, (b) is it going to stay flat-ish, (c) is it going to shrink slightly, or (d) is it going to crater?  Vote below in the comments section. The whole business model of their industry is still centered around the “30-second (TV) spot.”  It sounds like they traditionally had made their money as a percentage of their clients spend on advertising, but that most of them had moved to a retainer type model that is closer to how law firms and consulting firms charge. while the Madison Avenue-ish firms were trying to hold onto the traditional marketing models.  transformation of marketing If you are an ad agency, a PR firm or a marketing services firm and think that the “Times Are A Changin,'” I’d encourage you to check out the marketing services transformation webinar. Last night I had a fascinating dinner hosted by the Massachusetts Interactive Technology Exchange that featured Google’s VP of Platforms, a bunch of senior executives from Madison Avenue-ish firms, a senior marketing exec from a Fortune 500 company, a marketing analyst and myself.  The conversation was really rich and enjoyable.  I felt like it ended up being HubSpot and Google arguing for the complete They were all exceptionally charismatic and convincing — Don Draper in the flesh.  I could see how these modern day Mad Men built huge businesses for themselves.  Regardless of what happens to their industry, their ability to sell will serve them well. Originally published Feb 18, 2010 9:33:00 AM, updated July 11 2013 I said that I thought the bright spot for Madison Avenue is that despite what many people say, I think creativity is more important than ever.  Back in 1970, if a 30-second spot came on the air, you basically had to watch it no matter how bad it was because you only had five crappy stations (a couple more with rabbit ear manipulation), no clicker, no cable, no DVR, no Hulu, etc.  In 2010, the content you create needs to be fantastic in order to get watched, get linked to, get shared on social media sites, etc.  I think the creativity bar today is an order of magnitude higher than it was 40 years ago.  Madison Ave has the talent to create remarkable content that will break through the clutter and this will serve them well through what I think will be a very rough decade. – Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack I was a little overshadowed on the charisma meter, but I made a couple of points that I didn’t think were half bad: I don’t know a lot of Madison Avenue bigwigs, so I learned a bunch of things that I’ll share with you below.  I’m hoping to create a dialog around what folks think the future of Madison Avenue looks like. Learn how HubSpot’s software, methodology and special programs for agencies and freelance marketing contractors can help you grow your business. There is a massive amount of consolidation going on in the industry by the big boys, but the valuations they pay are small multiples of EBITDA.  It struck me as odd that the big boys haven’t been more aggressive in buying some recurring revenue companies like Eloqua, Reachlocal, QuinStreet, etc.  One exception seems to be WPP, who has done some small investments in some really early (risky) startups — not sure why Sir Martin doesn’t swing a bit harder on getting recurring software revenue as it could give him a major competitive advantage.  These recurring revenue streams would smooth out the revenue/people lumps and dramatically improve their valuations. on our Company News Blog about our new marketing services transformation programs or download the slides from our I sat next to a great woman from one of the more forward looking Madison Ave-ish firms and part of her job was to manage her firm’s relationship with a major Fortune 100 client.  For this account alone, she had 80 people on her staff working on it.  From this conversation, I now understand why it is such a big deal when they lose a big account! It would be hard as hell to backfill those 80 people on a new account as it is really unlikely they are going to bag an elephant of that size around the same time as losing one, and it’s also going to be hard to spread 80 billable people around to other accounts in the meantime.  I suspect this type of situation must create major anxiety for managers and workers alike. @bhalligan Download the slides and audio from our webinar Download the audio and slides from our webinar where we relaunched the HubSpot partner program with significantly more benefits for marketing agencies. Webinar: Learn about the Benefits of Partnering with HubSpot I said that I thought Madison Avenue firms were going to have to dramatically change their business model.  In order to do so, they are going to have to dramatically shrink and then grow again.  My perspective is that they ought to do it willingly and proactively — rather than die by a thousand cuts like the newspaper executives are doing. Joey Parson For the most part, they all seemed to be in different states of denial about the demise of the 30-second spot.  They used clever lines like the only way the car companies are going to “move steel tonnage in volume” is by mass TV ad purchases.  Some convincing stats were spouted that sounded counter to everything I’d been reading, but they were relatively convincing.  To me, the denial feels like the newspaper industry denial 3 or 4 years ago, but I may be dead wrong about that. announcement I made today Photo Credit:last_img read more

How to Use Hashtags on Twitter: A Simple Guide for Marketers

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack I’d pet a million stray pit bulls before I’d eat a single pink-slimy McBite. #McDStories bit.ly/wd0BDe— Laura Goldman (@lauragoldman) February 4, 2012 The takeaway here is to consider the other ways people could possibly interpret your hashtag. A fast food chain, especially one that has experienced controversy and negativity toward its brand in the past, should understand that it probably has quite a few naysayers willing to speak out against their brand.Step 4: Promote the Hashtag by Incorporating it Into Other Marketing ChannelsA hashtag is only useful if people know about it. So to start generating conversations through your hashtag, start adding it your existing resources and channels. For instance, every time we have a webinar, we add the event hashtag to our email reminder or follow-up communication, and the presenter reminds attendees of the hashtag at the beginning of the live webinar as well. Similarly, we add the hashtag to the social media sharing links we include on landing pages.Step 5: Don’t Hijack Hashtags for Sensitive Situations As we’ve covered in a previous blog post, hijacking hashtags designed for serious and sensitive issues can lead to some pretty bad consequences. Designer Kenneth Cole, for example, tried to insert his brand into conversations about the Egypt uproar by tweeting the following: Through this tweet, Kenneth Cole tried to hijack the #Cairo hashtag in attempt to promote his spring collection. His message was received with strong public disapproval and media criticism. As David Meerman Scott says, “Don’t attempt to piggyback on news when it conveys extremely negative information, such as people’s deaths.”Below is Twitter’s official stance when it comes to hashtag abuse. As you can see, there’s more at stake than just PR backlash …”The following behaviors and others like them could cause your account to be filtered from search, or even suspended:Adding one or more topic/hashtag to an unrelated tweet in an attempt to gain attention in search.Repeatedly tweeting the same topic/hashtag without adding value to the conversation in an attempt to get the topic trending/trending higher.Tweeting about each trending topic in turn in order to drive traffic to your profile, especially when mixed with advertising.Listing the trending topics in combination with a request to be followed.Tweeting about a trending topic and posting a misleading link to something unrelated.” Hashtags Topics:center_img Step 6: Keep it ShortBe sure to keep your hashtag short and easy to remember. Remember that Twitter users are only allotted 140 characters in each tweet, with or without a hashtag. By keeping the hashtag brief, you’ll save your audience some room to include more commentary about your content.What are some of the lessons you’ve learned from using Twitter hashtags? Share them with us in the comments! Every time we host live webinars (and as this long list suggests, that is quite often), quite a few attendees get confused about what to do with the hashtag we provide. What is it? What does it do? How do you create one? Let me explain!Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.What is a hashtag?A Twitter hashtag is simply a keyword phrase, spelled out without spaces, with a pound sign (#) in front of it. For example, #inboundchat and #ILoveChocolate are both hashtags.What does a hashtag do?A Twitter hashtag ties the conversations of different users into one stream, which you can find by searching the hastag in Twitter Search or by using a third-party monitoring tool such as HootSuite.So, if Twitter users who are not otherwise connected talk about the same topic using a specific hashtag, their tweets will appear in the same stream. In that way, Twitter hashtags solve a coordination issue and facilitate a conversation. Popular hashtagged words often become trending topics — topics so many people are talking about that they are a “trend.”Hashtags are great for centralizing conversations around live, in-person events or conferences, live webinars, or other marketing campaigns you’re running.How do you create a hashtag?Contrary to what you might think, you don’t need any tools to create a hashtag. Hashtags are simply text, and they can be placed in the beginning, middle, or end of a tweet. Just decide on the keyword you are targeting, place a pound sign in front of it, and you are all set! See the image below for an example:How to Use Hashtags on TwitterStep 1: Check If It’s NewAfter you decide on a keyword or a phrase, search for it. Visit Search.Twitter.com and enter your preferred hashtag in the search box. Did you get any results? Is someone else already using that hashtag for their event or campaign?If there is a lot of conversation around it already, you might want to revisit your decision and pick something that isn’t as frequently used. In that way, you will reduce the chances of people who are not a part of your target audience entering/diluting the conversation you want to take place.Step 2: Pick Industry or Brand KeywordsHashtags can also help communicate a message to those not actively searching for them. For example, if someone you’re following is tweeting about an event using a hashtag, you will still be able to see their updates in your main Twitter feed without accessing the entire hashtag conversation. In other words, you’ll be able to catch a glimpse of what they’re tweeting about and quickly connect the content of the tweet to the hashtag they’re using. And if the hashtag reflects an industry or branded keyword that is interesting to you, you might be inclined to check out the rest of the conversation happening around that hashtag, a win for the marketer who created it!Step 3: Be Careful With SentimentsA lot of politicians and big brands have experienced Twitter failure by choosing hashtags that include the word “love” in them. Love is a strong word, so if you are putting it in the mouth of your followers, make sure they really love you. Otherwise, they might turn against you and cause a major PR controversy. For instance, theMitt Romney Twitter campaign that sought to wish him a happy birthday also attracted quite a lot of critical comments. If you are just starting out, pick something neutral that simply reflects your topic or campaign.Furthermore, beware hashtag campaigns that have the potential of getting abused by users. The McDonald’s #McDStories hashtag campaign, which was launched as a way to share fun stories about people’s experience at McDonald’s, is a great example of a hashtag choice gone wrong. What McDonald’s didn’t foresee was people sharing negative stories about the McDonald’s brand, and that’s exactly what happened. Anyone who searched for “McDStories” were immediately met with thousands of tweets similar to the one below, which described awful experiences users had with McDonald’s. Originally published Apr 24, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017last_img read more

14 Ways to Increase Your Clickthrough Rate on Twitter

first_imgAnd here’s an example of clear tweet copy: That’s a lot of metrics to follow. But in most cases, the most important outcome is a click on the link that you’ve posted.After all, link clicks account for 92% of all user interaction with tweets. Link clicks are the low-hanging fruit of Twitter, and they’re your strongest chance of gaining views and shares for your content.And I’m guessing you want more traffic and attention to your blog or the articles you share, right? When people click a link in a tweet, there tends to be a chain reaction: The more people clicking on your article via Twitter, the more exposure it gets. When more people read your article, more people are likely to share your article. Your social signals will likely rise, which improves your SEO. More activity on your site will also increase user engagement metrics. With all the extra traffic, you’ll also gain more conversions, more sales, and more revenue.Wow — all by improving the clickthrough rate (CTR) of your tweet? That’s right. My goal here is to show you how to increase the number of link clicks on your tweets.The Challenge: It Takes Work to Get Clicks on TwitterData shows the average Twitter CTR is 1.64%. According to SignUpTo, the more followers you have, the fewer clicks you’re getting on your tweets:Users with 50 – 1,000 followers had a 6.16% CTR.Users with 1,000 – 5,000 followers had a 1.45% CTR.Users with 5,000 – 10,000 followers had a 0.55% CTR.Users with 10,000+ followers had a 0.45% CTR.Plus, Twitter is a crowded place. With 271 million monthly active users and 500 million tweets sent out each day, you have a lot of competition to deal with. But Twitter is an important platform for driving traffing to your website, generating leads, and getting in touch with customers and prospects. And you can always do more to increase your engagement rate on Twitter. Challenges or none, there are ways to craft a tweet that compels more users to click through. Here are 14 ways to do it.14 Ways to Increase Clickthrough Rate on Twitter1) Use clear language.Remember, your followers are likely scrolling through their feeds and scanning tweets very quickly. To catch their attention, be as clear as possible by choosing simple, easily scannable language.HubSpot did a study where they compared CTRs from two different tweet types: those with clear, to-the-point copy and those with more ambiguous copy. They found that “clearly stated offers received 18% more clicks and 29.8% more retweets than the tweets with a more ambiguous copy.”Here’s an example they used of ambiguous tweet copy: Get a sneak peek backstage on how @HubSpot does inbound marketing: http://t.co/QouXCtUXeu pic.twitter.com/9Z6acPm4OL— HubSpot (@HubSpot) July 14, 2014 Free Kit: The Marketer’s Crash Course in Visual Content Creation http://t.co/g89AT0Pgcy pic.twitter.com/WY9XMgvaj1— HubSpot (@HubSpot) July 18, 2014 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack The clearer you can be, the more likely you are to get clickthroughs to your URL. Sometimes, that means simply tweeting the title of the article or offer you’re linking to. Which brings me to my next point …2) Use the article title or headline.Good copywriters know that writing headlines is one of the most important steps to writing an article. Headlines are what make people click. So why wouldn’t you use the copy from a great headline when tweeting out article?One Twitter researcher was able to gain an 18% clickthrough rate simply by using compelling headlines. Hubspot’s research showed that their average tweet copy got an average of 98 clicks, while headline-based tweets got an average of 110 clicks.Twitter is a sales and advertising platform, and headlines really do matter — and they’re a great place to borrow copy for your tweets. In studies that I’ve conducted, a single headline word change produced a 46% improvement in clickthroughs. Advertising wizard David Ogilvy was so enamored of the importance of headlines that he wrote this: “Unless your headline sells your product, you have wasted 90 percent of your money.”As it turns out, the fundamental rule of clickable tweets is the same as the rule of clickable headlines. The headlines have to sizzle. Headlines with higher clickthrough rates tend to …Be short. You only have 140 characters, so you can’t afford a long title. Outbrain discovered that eight-word titles had a 21% higher CTR than the average title. Social Media Scientist Dan Zarrella analyzed 200,000 tweets with links and found that the 120-130-character range was the sweet spot for high CTR.Ask a question. Why does this work? Questions prompt curiosity, which leads to people wanting to satisfy that curiosity (source).Use exclamation points. Data shows that three exclamation points will improve the CTR more than twice as much as any other form of punctuation (source).Use at least one superlative. Superlatives are words like “best,” “most,” “smartest.” Headlines with one superlative outperformed all other variations of superlatives (or none at all).Use a fun tone. Titles that are lighthearted and humorous have a higher CTR than their serious counterparts (source).Not be in all caps. The online equivalent of shouting is a turnoff; 64% of readers prefer sentence case.Include a number. Headlines that include numbers have a 15% higher CTR than those that don’t. Use an odd number if you can, as headlines that contain odd numbers have a 20% higher CTR than those containing even numbers.Be a two-sided title with a colon or hyphen. For example, “SEO: 7 Reasons Why It Still Matters” or “8 Ways to More Money — Warren Buffett’s Secrets.” Titles that have two parts like these ones have a 9% higher CTR than those with one part.3) Use verbs.Humans find verbs much more cognitively interesting than nouns. In fact, studies show that simply seeing or listening to a verb can signal the body’s motor system. It’s no surprise, then, that using more verbs in your tweets is can be a powerful way to increase clickthrough rate.Zarrella found in his analysis that tweets that included more verbs and adverbs, rather than nouns and adjectives, received far higher CTR rates. 4) Post fewer statistics.Statistics are awesome, but if you’re looking to improve clickthrough rate for your tweets, it might be better for you to choose something else to pull from the content you’re linking to. HubSpot found that their tweets with statistics had 32% fewer clicks per tweet than non-stat-based tweets. But you’ll want to experiment to see what your audience responds to.5) Tweet on the weekend.This will depend on your audience, so you should do some experimentation. But Zarrella found from his analysis of hundreds of thousands of tweets that CTRs were highest on Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday.6) Tweet in the afternoon.The timing of your tweets on a given day makes a difference, too. Zarrella found that tweets posted at 2:00 P.M. have the highest CTR. (Remember to experiment to see when your target audience is most interactive, though, and to post at that time.)7) Use images. If you use images in your tweet, you will receive higher clickthrough rates — as much as 18%.Image Credit: HubSpot8) Space out your tweets.If you’re tweeting in spurts, your followers might think you’re spamming them. Instead of tweeting all at once, space out your tweets. Tweets that are spaced appropriately get higher CTRs, according to Zarrella’s research. Buffer recommends putting a space of 30 minutes before and after the tweets for which you want high engagement.(Pro tip: Scheduling your tweets ahead of time will make your life a lot easier. Here’s a social media publishing template if you don’t have one already.)9) Use hashtags. Hashtags are a great way to improve your online presence. Above all, using hashtags will help you get more engagement and visibility. More specifically, you’ll get more clicks on your tweets.But don’t overdo it by adding too many hashtags to your post. Buddy Media found that tweets with hashtags get double the engagement metrics that no hashtags get — but tweets with one or two hashtags have a 21% higher engagement than tweets with three or more. (For more guidance on hashtag etiquette, check out this blog post.)Image credit: Buffer10) Ask for action.The call to action (CTA) is an indispensable part of all marketing. The same holds true for clickable tweets. What kind of action do you want your followers to take? Ask them to do something on the page where you’re directing them. Here are some examples:Grab your 15% coupon before time runs out!! example.com/couponecodeSign up now to hear about our mind-blowing new product. example.com/mindblowingnewproductIt’s free! Download your copy today. example/downloadnowEach of these sample tweets has a clear text CTA followed by a link. This structure makes it very obvious that you want the user to then click on that link.11) Don’t necessarily place the link at the end of the tweet.Zarrella’s analysis of 200,000 link-containing tweets concluded that putting the link approximately 25% of the way through would achieve the highest CTR.12) Talk about Twitter.Twitter users want to hear more about Twitter. They’re already using the platform — it naturally follows that they will be interested in tweets that have to do with that platform.HubSpot found that their tweets that included links to blog posts and offers about Twitter and other social media topics received 22.5% more clicks on average than the average clicks for a tweet during a set period of time.How can you talk about Twitter if your subject has nothing to do with Twitter? Try one of these:Hey Twitter users….Best thing on Twitter all day…You needed this in your Twitter feed…Twitter is raving about…13) Talk about and link to infographics.Infographics are a hugely popular topic on Twitter. A lot of people search for infographics on Twitter, so simply using the word “infographic” will bring more visibility to your tweets.Not only can infographics double your blog traffic, but they can multiply your clickthroughs on Twitter.  In one study, infographics received 832% more retweets than articles and 746% more clickthroughs.Image Credit: Adweek14) Make sure your links work.Nothing is worse than posting a perfectly optimized tweet with a busted link. The most common form of link errors is not having a space before the link. So check, double-check and triple-check that you’ve added a space between your tweet copy and the link.By following these guidelines, you can be confident that you’re doing exactly what you should do to get the most clicks out of your tweets. Now, for your homework: Pick up a link to share, head over to Twitter, and create a clickable tweet!What techniques do you use to create clickable tweets? Share with us in the comments below! Originally published Mar 19, 2015 8:00:00 AM, updated August 25 2017 Topics: Social Media Engagement Tweeting is easy. You can type up anything in three seconds and press “tweet.” But sending a clickable tweet — that, my friend, is a science.Thankfully, making your tweets clickable doesn’t “just happen” based on the whim of the Twitter gods. It happens when you intentionally apply a certain set of principles.In this post, we’ll talk about how to put the science of Twitter to work for you so more people click on your tweets.Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.Defining a “Click” on a TweetBefore we dive in here, what does it mean for a person to “click on your tweet”? Think about it: There are nine different ways a user can click your tweet. They can …Retweet your tweetFavorite your tweetClick your hashtagsClick your @-mentionsClick your linkClick your pictureClick the white space to expand the tweetClick your Twitter handle to view your profileClick the “Follow” button to follow youlast_img read more

Password Statistics: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly [Infographic]

first_img Business Tools Topics: 369Save Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img When was the last time you changed your email password? Your Facebook password? How about your bank account password?If it’s been a while, you may want to take a few minutes and change ’em up. According to a survey of 2,000 people in the U.S. and the U.K., almost three-quarters of consumers use the same exact password for multiple accounts. What’s more, a large number of people haven’t changed that duplicate password in over five years.So it should come to no surprise that about 40% of people have had an online account hacked, a password stolen, or were notified their personal information had been compromised. But, although 8 in 10 people say they’re concerned about the security of their online accounts, they’re still using weak, old, or repeated passwords that can be easily stolen or hacked.How can you make sure your online accounts are safe? Check out the infographic below from TeleSign to learn more compelling statistics about password safety, common password mistakes to avoid, and how to protect your online accounts with more than just a password.369Save Originally published Aug 31, 2015 12:00:00 PM, updated September 15 2015last_img read more

10 Time Wasters That Limit Your Blogging Productivity (And How to Avoid Them)

first_img Topics: Productivity When it comes to blogging, there are tons of excuses we give ourselves (or sometimes our bosses) explaining why we just can’t get to writing them right now. While many of these excuses (not enough time, too busy with client work, no writers on staff to create content or edit it, etc.) may in fact be valid and perfectly understandable, it doesn’t change the fact that in order to have successful content marketing, you must also have frequent, relevant content to actually post, too.So instead of continuously finding reasons to put blogging on the back burner, why not define what the time wasters at work are that are preventing you from getting it done, and change them? Here are a few common ones to start off with that may help at your place of business:1) Ineffective Multi-taskingFor many of us, our day-to-day routine at work requires wearing a lot of hats and being an effective multi-tasker. But the truth is, we’re not as great at it as we think. In a recent study, Earl Miller—a Picower professor of neuroscience at MIT—claimed that it is actually very difficult for people to fully focus on more than one thing at a time, but are much better at switching focus between tasks very quickly, giving the illusion of effective multi-tasking.An example might be someone thinking that they are effectively writing an email and talking on the phone at the same time. Because both involve communicating (whether verbal or written) and thus are competing to use the same part of the brain to complete them, we are not really multi-tasking—we’re simply switching our focus very rapidly back and forth between tasks.Tips for better blogging productivity:The goal is to be as effective as possible when it comes to productivity so you actually can have time for things like blogging. Try to stay focused on one task at a time. If your schedule allows for it, you can also try to prioritize your tasks into groups (i.e. lumping together tasks that are more communication-based, analytical-based, and so on and so forth.).2) Sitting in on Every MeetingWhen it comes to meetings, there are often many that are unnecessary for everyone to attend, or at least not for the whole duration of them. In some cases, meetings are planned with a clear topic and objective in mind, but often spiral off in tangents once the meetings have begun. Maybe that type of discussion is necessary for some roles, but it’s likely that the bulk of the staff are not needed in those.Tips for better blogging productivityFor those roles in a company that are designed to see things from a broader view (more managerial and directorial positions), these meetings might be necessary to attend. But other more task-oriented positions may benefit from just getting the highlights from one person who attended, as these individuals often have pressing deadlines that can get interrupted with too many meetings.Each meeting should also be directed with a clear topic of discussion that leads to each person’s/department’s specific action items, a realistic timeline and a follow-up meeting to go over the progress.3) Getting Sucked into the Black Hole that is Social MediaAlmost every one of us who have social media accounts are guilty of over-frequenting our news feeds at some point or another. Even if interacting on multiple social media platforms is a big part of your job, it’s important to set aside time for personal use, rather than during work hours. Overusing or stopping sporadically to check your accounts (even if for business purposes) can make it much more challenging to get back into a strong workflow.Tips for better blogging productivityInstead of reading up on current statuses, try scheduling out a short 30 minutes to read up on some of the top blogging best practices from the pros. There are a ton of great online resources for beginners and regular bloggers alike that discuss best practices for different types of blogs, too, including corporate/professional, personal, hobby/interest, community, etc. 4) Having a Disorganized WorkspaceThis is something that frequently gets overlooked, but can nonetheless be a big time waster. And many aren’t afraid to admit it. In fact, in an OfficeMax survey, it was found that out of 1,000 workers, 90 percent of them believe that clutter does, in fact, create a negative work environment. And 77 percent of them claimed that clutter also negatively affects their productivity. This accounts not only for tangible documents on your desk, but files on your desktop, unopened/unsorted emails and other similar digital materials that require sorting.Tips for better blogging productivityTry making it a habit to file a document away every time you create or acquire one. It will keep you from spending hours trying to search for something and prevent you from dedicating entire days to giving your workspace a thorough cleaning. Similar to the advice given by popular chefs and cooks today, forming the good habit of “cleaning as you go” will clear up a lot of time for you to do other things—in this case, getting crackin’ on that blog.5) ProcrastinatingProcrastination almost never works out for the better in any situation, but especially when it comes to the workplace. Waiting until the last minute to get things done can force you to push back other time-sensitive tasks, looping you into an endless cycle of overdue items.Tips for better blogging productivitySetting daily or hourly goals for getting things done can help you stay on track and avoid procrastinating. Treat it the way you would a bank account: you have X amount of dollars (in this case, hours) to get something done and once that’s gone you will have to get a loan with interest (hours from the next work day) to pay for your expenses.Sticking to this “budget” can help you visualize that procrastinating can actually accumulate a lot of work for you in the future, and hopefully help you find the time to squeeze in some writing time for your blog.6) Losing Focus Due to NoiseMany workplaces are now adapting to more collaborative spaces, ditching the individual offices and setting up cubicles/desks within an open, spacious area. The problem that often comes with this type of setup, however, is distraction due to high levels of noise in any one space.While some may argue that listening to music helps keep them focused, it really depends on the individual—how they work best and what type of work they’re trying to complete. In an inbound marketing agency, for example, someone in more of a designer or producer role might function more efficiently with some background music.A marketing strategist or content writer, on the other hand, may function better in silence. Either way, if the noise (music, internal conversations, conference calls on speaker phone, etc.) is not being controlled by the individual, it’s likely to distract them.Tips for better blogging productivityIf you’re wanting to make time for writing blog articles, you probably fall into the category that does better without noise. So if your office is typically on the noisy side, instead of staring at your computer screen for 10 minutes trying to finish writing the same dang sentence, try using some ear plugs or noise-canceling headphones at the first sign of distraction. You can then get in your own zone and tune your rambunctious coworkers out while you type.7) Socializing for Too LongLet’s face it: many of us like to socialize. Not necessarily because we’re all a bunch of gossips, but because we spend the majority of our days (and our weeks) with the people we work with, so we develop a desire to connect with them on a personal level.The problem comes in when a morning catch-up session or an afternoon instant-message conversation lasts for a couple of hours or half the day—it can certainly impede on productivity.Tips for better blogging productivityOne way to avoid this is by redirecting these chats to happen first thing in the morning, during a group lunch, at an after-work happy hour, or on a break. Set up a meeting in your calendar (even if it’s just with yourself) to block out some time just for blogging. If someone wants to chat during that time, simply ask to continue the conversation after your time block is over or at another time.8) Being a Literary PerfectionistPerhaps one of the biggest time wasters in the office has to do with the actual process we have for writing blogs. There’s a fair chance you may just be overdoing it. Similar to how a designer can sometimes forget the value of white space, many of us wordsmiths sometimes forget the value of conciseness. Just because you’re creating a piece of content doesn’t mean your viewers are going to spend time like they would reading their favorite novel to absorb it all.In fact, in an article by the research company Nielsen Norman Group that discusses how little online materials are actually read by users, results showed that the average viewer only has time to read about 28 percent of the words on any given Web page. That’s why it’s important to stay focused and get to the point.Tips for better blogging productivityStart your process by creating an outline. It should consist of:The blog topic or headline you’d like to write aboutA list of the direct points you want to makeA clear CTA, or direct action you’d like the viewer to takeOutlining these basic components (and actually writing them out) can help serve as a reminder of what’s really important in this piece.9) Not Asking QuestionsSometimes the reason we procrastinate is because we’re unsure of how to get something done or we’re not entirely sure what the objective of the task is. Not asking questions for clarification right off the bat, or even along the way, can become a huge waste of time.Whether it’s not knowing where to research something, who to contact, what message you’re trying to convey in an email, or something similar, being confused about a task and not asking for clarification can lead to procrastination or double the work later on.Tips for better blogging productivityAsk a bunch of questions right off the bat if you’re unsure of how to complete the task at hand, and be sure you have (or can quickly get) the answers before blindly attempting to do it. With all the right tools and information, you’re bound to increase productivity. And increased productivity means more time for blogging.10) Visiting Non-Work Related Websites Throughout the DayAnother big distraction and time waster at work is the Internet. Of course, many of us depend on it to get work done for our employers, but according to a Salary.com survey, approximately 64 percent of employees visit non-work related websites every day during work hours. The survey also concluded that these websites also kept most employees off-task and unproductive.Tips for better blogging productivityIf you find yourself needing a quick break from your day-to-day tasks and find yourself wanting to browse the Web a bit, try visiting a few popular blogs from leaders in your industry to get some inspiration for content to use in your own blog. This way, taking a break from the grind of work can be still be productive, as it’s helping you research for your next article. Originally published Nov 20, 2015 1:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more